A trial of GC4711 and SBRT for pancreatic cancer (GRECO-2)

Cancer type:

Pancreatic cancer

Status:

Open

Phase:

Phase 2

This trial is looking at adding GC4711 to stereotactic body radiotherapy for pancreatic cancer.

It is for people:

  • who can’t have surgery to remove the cancer or it could be difficult to remove and
  • whose cancer hasn’t spread to other parts of the body

More about this trial

You might have chemotherapy for pancreatic cancer that hasn’t spread, or isn’t possible to remove with surgery. After chemotherapy you might have stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Doctors are looking for ways to improve how well radiotherapy works for pancreatic cancer. In this trial they are looking at adding GC4711. 

GC4711 is a drug still being studied. Early research shows that it may improve how well radiotherapy works. It might also reduce damage to tissue that radiotherapy can cause.

In this trial some people have SBRT and GC4711. And some have SBRT and a dummy drug (placebo Open a glossary item).

The main aims of the trial are to find out:

  • how safe GC4711 is 
  • if adding GC4711 to SBRT improves how well radiotherapy works
  • more about the side effects 
  • what happens to GC4711 in the body 
  • if treatment can shrink the cancer enough to remove it by surgery

Who can enter

The following bullet points are a summary of the entry conditions for this trial. Talk to your doctor or the trial team if you are unsure about any of these. They will be able to advise you. 

Who can take part

You may be able to join this trial if all of the following apply. You:

  • have adenocarcinoma Open a glossary item of the pancreas
  • have newly diagnosed pancreatic cancer that hasn’t spread to other parts of the body
  • have cancer that has grown into surrounding tissues and it isn’t possible to remove, it could be difficult to remove or you don’t want to have surgery
  • have a CT scan Open a glossary item to confirm your cancer hasn’t spread elsewhere in the body after your chemotherapy is finished
  • are suitable to have stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT)
  • have cancer that your doctor can see on a scan 
  • have completed at least 6 weeks of a combination of chemotherapy called FOLFIRINOX, modified FOLFIRINOX or a combination of chemotherapy that included gemcitabine before starting SBRT
  • have satisfactory blood test results 
  • are up and about more than half the day, you can look after yourself but might not be able to work (performance status 0 to 2)
  • are willing to use reliable contraception during treatment and for a period of time after if there is any chance you or your partner could become pregnant. 
  • are at least 18 years old 

Who can’t take part

Cancer related
You cannot join this trial if any of these apply. You:

  • have cancer that has spread elsewhere in the body
  • have had chemotherapy other than FOLFIRINOX, modified FOLFIRINOX or a combination of chemotherapy that included gemcitabine before starting SBRT
  • have pancreatic cancer that has grown into the bowel or stomach 
  • have already had radiotherapy to the tummy (abdomen) that overlaps where you will have your SBRT
  • have side effects from past treatments that aren’t better
  • have another cancer that needs treatment 
  • are having treatment with an experimental drug as part of another clinical trial

Medical conditions
You cannot join this trial if any of these apply. You:

  • have a significant heart problem Open a glossary item or heart condition that isn’t well controlled with medication. Your doctor checks your heart before you join the trial.
  • have a peptic ulcer Open a glossary item that isn’t well controlled with treatment within 30 days of starting trial treatment 
  • have an ongoing infection that would delay your treatment 
  • have a condition called Gilbert’s syndrome
  • have a low level of potassium in the blood with a change to your heart rhythm  
  • are having treatment with another drug that can cause a drop in your blood pressure. Your doctor will check the medications you are taking. 
  • have any other health condition or mental health problem that the trial team think would affect you taking part

Other 
You cannot join this trial if any of these apply. You:

  • have had an allergic reaction to another drug similar to GC4711 or anything it contains 
  • are pregnant or breastfeeding

Trial design

This phase 2 trial is taking place worldwide. The team need to find 160 people to take part including 38 from the UK. 

It is a randomised trial. You are put into a group by a computer. Neither you nor your doctor will be able to decide which group you are in. Nor will you know which group you are in. Your doctor can find this out if necessary.

There are 2 treatment groups. You have 1 of the following:

  • stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) and GC4711
  • SBRT and a dummy drug (placebo)

 
Before you start SBRT you must have completed at least 6 weeks of chemotherapy. This chemotherapy is part of your standard treatment Open a glossary item and isn’t part of the trial treatment. 

Trial treatment
You start trial treatment about a week after you finish chemotherapy. You have some scans at the hospital first to plan the stereotactic radiotherapy. The team can tell you when you have these scans and how long you’ll be at the hospital for.

You have 5 doses of SBRT. It takes about 15-60 minutes each time. Before each dose you have one dose of GC4711 or the dummy drug. You have this as a drip into a vein. It takes about 15 minutes each time. 

Treatment takes up to about 10 days in total. The team tell you which days you have treatment on. There is likely to be a day or 2 between each treatment. 

You also take a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) medication during treatment. This medication works by blocking and reducing the production of stomach acid. This gives any damaged tissue from radiotherapy time to heal.

Further treatment 
After you finish SBRT, your doctor and the team will decide whether surgery is possible. If so, you may have surgery to remove the cancer. You may also have additional chemotherapy after radiotherapy or surgery. Your doctor will talk to you about surgery and what this involves. 

Blood samples for research 
The team ask to take some extra blood samples. Where possible, you have these at the same time as your routine blood tests. They plan to use the samples to see what happens to GC4711 in the body. 

Activities of daily living questionnaire
You fill out a questionnaire at set times during the trial and after finishing treatment. The questionnaire is to find out how you are getting on with your normal activities of daily living. The team can tell you more about this. 

Hospital visits

You see a doctor and have some tests before you can take part in the trial.

These include:

  • a physical examination Open a glossary item 
  • blood tests
  • heart trace (ECG Open a glossary item)
  • CT scan and MRI scan 

You might need to have an endoscopy.

You have all your treatment at the hospital. 

Follow up visits 
The trial team follow you up for 3 years after your last dose of radiotherapy. You see them for a check up and blood tests: 

  • at one month
  • at 3 months 
  • every 2 to 3 months for the first 2 years and then
  • every 6 months in the 3rd year 

When you finish treatment you have a CT or MRI scan at 1 month. After that you have a CT scan:

  • every 3 months in the first year and second year and then
  • every 6 months in the third year 

You stop having these trial check ups and scans if your cancer gets worse. Your doctor will talk to you about other treatment options. The team then continue to follow you up regularly. A member of the team may call you or see you at a routine hospital appointment.

Side effects

The trial team monitor you during treatment and afterwards. Contact your advice line or tell your doctor or nurse if any side effects are bad or not getting better. 
 
About 100 healthy volunteers have had GC4711 so far. The most common side effects of GC4711 we know about so far include: 

  • feeling lightheaded, faint, dizzy or having low blood pressure
  • facial tingling
  • feeling sick
  • headache
  • pain, bruising, or redness where you had the GC4711 infusion 
  • tiredness (fatigue)

The most common side effects of stereotactic body radiotherapy include:

The doctor will talk to you about all the possible side effects of treatment when you join the trial. 

We have more information about:

Location

Aberdeen
Cambridge
Glasgow
London
Oxford

Recruitment start:

Recruitment end:

How to join a clinical trial

Please note: In order to join a trial you will need to discuss it with your doctor, unless otherwise specified.

Please note - unless we state otherwise in the summary, you need to talk to your doctor about joining a trial.

Chief Investigator

Dr Thankamma Ajithkumar

Supported by

Galera Therapeutics

Freephone 0808 800 4040

Last review date

CRUK internal database number:

18181

Please note - unless we state otherwise in the summary, you need to talk to your doctor about joining a trial.

Charlie took part in a trial to try new treatments

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“I think it’s really important that people keep signing up to these type of trials to push research forward.”

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