A trial looking at a new drug called LY2940680 and paclitaxel for advanced cancer (HIPROC)

Cancer type:

All cancer types

Status:

Results

Phase:

Phase 1

This trial looked at the combination of taladegib and paclitaxel for people with cancer that had come back after treatment. 

The trial was supported by Cancer Research UK. It was open for people to join between 2015 and 2017. The team analysed the results in 2020.

More about this trial

The research team wanted to see if taladegib (LY2940680) and a chemotherapy drug called paclitaxel helped stop cancer growing. 

Taladegib is a type of targeted cancer treatment called a cancer growth blocker. It helps stop signals that cancer cells use to divide and grow.

The research team planned to do this trial in 2 parts. 

The first part was for people with any solid tumour Open a glossary item. This means a cancer that is not leukaemia or lymphoma. The results of this part are below.

The second part of the trial was due to be for people with ovarian cancer. The team were not able to do this part because there were problems with the supply of taladegib. The pharmaceutical company who made the drug decided not to continue with the trial.

The main aims of the trial were to find out:

  • the best dose of taladegib to give with paclitaxel
  • more about the side effects

Summary of results

The research team found the best dose of taladegib to give in part 1 of this trial. They weren’t able to do part 2 because of problems with the supply of taladegib.

Trial design
This trial was for people who’d had treatment but their cancer had continued to grow. 

The first few people had the lowest dose of taladegib. As they didn’t have any serious side effects, the next few people had a higher dose. And so on, until they found the best dose to give. This is called a dose escalation study.

Results
A total of 16 people joined the trial. They all had taladegib and paclitaxel.

In total:

  • 3 people had the lowest dose of taladegib
  • 6 people had a medium dose of taladegib
  • 7 people had the higher dose of taladegib

 People who had the lowest dose or medium dose of taladegib didn’t have any side serious side effects. But some people who had the higher dose did. So the team decided the medium dose was the best one to use. 

The main serious side effect of those in the higher dose group was numbness and tingling in the hands and feet. This is called peripheral neuropathy.

The trial team also looked at how well treatment worked in 14 of the people who took part.

It’s hard to draw any firm conclusions because of the small number of people. But the results showed that, 4 months after joining the trial, the cancer had:

  • got a bit smaller in 4 people
  • stayed the same in 6 people
  • continued to grow in 4 people


Conclusion
The research team concluded that they found the best dose of taladegib to give alongside paclitaxel. 

Where this information comes from    
We have based this summary on information from the research team. As far as we are aware, the information they sent us has not been reviewed independently (peer reviewed Open a glossary item) or published in a medical journal yet. The figures we quote above were provided by the research team. We have not analysed the data ourselves.

Recruitment start:

Recruitment end:

How to join a clinical trial

Please note: In order to join a trial you will need to discuss it with your doctor, unless otherwise specified.

Please note - unless we state otherwise in the summary, you need to talk to your doctor about joining a trial.

Chief Investigator

Dr Ros Glasspool

Supported by

Cancer Research UK
Experimental Cancer Medicine Centre (ECMC)
Ignyta Inc
NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde
NIHR Clinical Research Network: Cancer

Freephone 0808 800 4040

Last review date

CRUK internal database number:

12213

Please note - unless we state otherwise in the summary, you need to talk to your doctor about joining a trial.

Charlie took part in a trial to try new treatments

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“I think it’s really important that people keep signing up to these type of trials to push research forward.”

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