A study comparing 2 scans to see how well treatment works for advanced kidney cancer

Cancer type:

Kidney cancer
Renal cell carcinoma

Status:

Results

Phase:

Phase 2

This study compared results from CT scans and a type of PET-CT scan for people having treatment for advanced kidney cancer. The research team wanted to see if PET-CT scans could help show how well treatment was working.

More about this trial

This study was for people with advanced kidney cancer. They were due to have treatment with a type of cancer growth blocker called a tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI). 

They all had a type of PET-CT scan called an 18F-RGD PET-CT scan and a CT scan before, during and after treatment. They had an injection of a radioactive tracer before the PET-CT scan. This helps show up the cancer’s blood supply on the scan. 

The researchers hoped that the amount of tracer taken up by the cancer would be linked to the size of the cancer, and show how well the treatment was working.

The aim of this study was to see if 18F-RGD PET-CT scans could be used to see how well treatment for kidney cancer is working.

Summary of results

This study recruited 10 people with renal cell cancer (kidney cancer) that had spread to another part of the body. The research team had hoped to recruit more people, but they were unable to and had to close the trial earlier than planned.

Everyone taking part was due to have treatment with a tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI), such as sunitinib

They had scans before treatment (scan 1), during treatment (scan 2) and after treatment (scan 3). The research team looked at the amount of radioactive tracer that was taken up by the cancer on the PET-CT scans. They compared this to the size of the cancer on the CT scans. They wanted to see if there was a link between the two measurements.

They found that the change in the amount of tracer taken up by the cancer between scan 1 and scan 2, was related to the change in the size of the cancer.

But the change in the amount of tracer taken up by the cancer between scan 1 and scan 3, was not related to the change in the size of the cancer.

No one taking part had any serious side effects from the tracer injection.

The research team found that it was difficult to draw any firm conclusions because of the small number of people who took part in the study

We have based this summary on information from the research team. The information they sent us has been reviewed by independent specialists (peer reviewed Open a glossary item) but may not have been published in a medical journal.  The figures we quote above were provided by the research team. We have not analysed the data ourselves.

Recruitment start:

Recruitment end:

How to join a clinical trial

Please note: In order to join a trial you will need to discuss it with your doctor, unless otherwise specified.

Please note - unless we state otherwise in the summary, you need to talk to your doctor about joining a trial.

Chief Investigator

Professor Fergus Gleeson

Supported by

Experimental Cancer Medicine Centre (ECMC)
GE Healthcare
Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust

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Last review date

CRUK internal database number:

9369

Please note - unless we state otherwise in the summary, you need to talk to your doctor about joining a trial.

Charlie took part in a trial to try new treatments

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“I think it’s really important that people keep signing up to these type of trials to push research forward.”

Last reviewed:

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