Ovarian cancer incidence statistics

Cases

New cases of ovarian cancer, 2013, UK

Proportion of all cases

Percentage ovarian cancer is of total cancer cases, 2013, UK

 

Age

Age that more than half of ovarian cancer cases are diagnosed, 2011-2013, UK

 

Trend since 1970s

Ovarian cancer incidence rates have increased since the late 1970s, GB

 

Ovarian cancer is the sixth most common cancer among females in the UK (2013), accounting for 4% of all new cases of cancer in females.[1-4]

In 2013, there were 7,284 new cases of ovarian cancer in the UK.[1-4] The crude incidence rate Open a glossary item shows that there are 22 new ovarian cancer cases for every 100,000 females in the UK.

The European age-standardised incidence rates Open a glossary item (AS rates) do not differ significantly between the constituent countries of the UK.

Ovarian Cancer (C56-C57.4), Number of New Cases, Crude and European Age-Standardised (AS) Incidence Rates per 100,000 Population, UK, 2013

England Wales Scotland Northern Ireland UK
Cases 6,102 413 595 174 7,284
Crude Rate 22.3 26.4 21.7 18.7 22.4
AS Rate 23.4 25.5 21.7 20.7 23.3
AS Rate - 95% LCL 22.8 23.0 19.9 17.6 22.7
AS Rate - 95% UCL 24.0 27.9 23.4 23.8 23.8

95% LCL and 95% UCL are the 95% lower and upper confidence limits Open a glossary item around the AS rate Open a glossary item.

ASR calculated with ESP2013. Not comparable with ASRs calculated with ESP1976.

Ovarian cancer incidence rates throughout the UK vary only moderately between cancer networks, with the highest rates in areas of the Midlands and the South West, and the lowest rates being in areas of Yorkshire and the South East.[5,6]

References

  1. Data were provided by the Office for National Statistics on request, July 2015. Similar data can be found here: http://www.ons.gov.uk/ons/rel/vsob1/cancer-statistics-registrations--england--series-mb1-/index.html.
  2. Data were provided by ISD Scotland on request, April 2015. Similar data can be found here: http://www.isdscotland.org/Health-Topics/Cancer/Publications/index.asp.
  3. Data were provided by the Welsh Cancer Intelligence and Surveillance Unit on request, February 2015. Similar data can be found here:http://www.wales.nhs.uk/sites3/page.cfm?orgid=242&pid=59080.
  4. Data were provided by the Northern Ireland Cancer Registry on request, March 2015. Similar data can be found here: http://www.qub.ac.uk/research-centres/nicr/
  5. National Cancer Intelligence Network. Cancer Incidence and Mortality by Cancer Network, UK, 2005. London: NCIN; 2008.
  6. National Cancer Intelligence Network. Cancer e-Atlas. Accessed January 2014.
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Ovarian cancer incidence is strongly related to age, with the highest incidence rates being in older females. In the UK in 2011-2013, on average each year more than half (53%) of cases were diagnosed in females aged 65 and over.[1-4]

Age-specific incidence rates rise sharply from around age 35-39, peak in those aged 80-84, and subsequently drop sharply.[1-4]

Ovarian Cancer (C56-C57.4), Average Number of New Cases per Year and Age-Specific Incidence Rates per 100,000 Population, Females, UK, 2011-2013

References

  1. Data were provided by the Office for National Statistics on request, July 2015. Similar data can be found here: http://www.ons.gov.uk/ons/rel/vsob1/cancer-statistics-registrations--england--series-mb1-/index.html.
  2. Data were provided by ISD Scotland on request, April 2015. Similar data can be found here: http://www.isdscotland.org/Health-Topics/Cancer/Publications/index.asp.
  3. Data were provided by the Welsh Cancer Intelligence and Surveillance Unit on request, February 2015. Similar data can be found here:http://www.wales.nhs.uk/sites3/page.cfm?orgid=242&pid=59080.
  4. Data were provided by the Northern Ireland Cancer Registry on request, March 2015. Similar data can be found here: http://www.qub.ac.uk/research-centres/nicr/.
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Ovarian cancer incidence rates have increased by 17% in females in Great Britain since the late 1970s.[1-3] This includes an increase followed by a decrease during this time.

European age-standardised (AS) Open a glossary item incidence rates increased by 28% between 1979-1981 and 1997-1999, and have since decreased by 8% (between 1997-1999 and 2011-2013).

Ovarian Cancer (C56-C57.4), European Age-Standardised Incidence Rates, Females, Great Britain, 1979-2013

ASR calculated with ESP2013. Not comparable with ASRs calculated with ESP1976.

Over the last decade in the UK (between 2002-2004 and 2011-2013), ovarian cancer AS incidence rates in females have decreased by 6%.[1-4]

Ovarian Cancer (C56-C57.4), European Age-Standardised Incidence Rates, Females, UK, 1993-2013

ASR calculated with ESP2013. Not comparable with ASRs calculated with ESP1976.

Ovarian cancer incidence trends probably reflect changing prevalence of risk factors, with recent incidence trends influenced by risk factor prevalence in years past. Changes in data registration probably also play a part.[5]

Ovarian cancer incidence rates have increased overall for most broad age groups (except females aged 50-59) in Great Britain since the late 1970s. The largest increases have been in females aged 0-24, with European age standardised (AS) incidence rates increasing by more than double (155% increase) between 1979-1981 and 2011-2013.[1-3] However, incidence rates for this age group remain relatively low (around 1 per 100,000 females in 2011-2013). In females aged 70-79 and 80+, rates increased by 47% and 67%, respectively, between 1979-1981 and 2001-2003, but both have subsequently fallen by less than a tenth (4% and 7% decreases, respectively). For females aged 60-69, incidence rates also peaked in 2001-2003, having increased by 37% between 1979-1981 and 2001-2003, and have decreased by 16% between 2001-2003 and 2011-2013. Rates in females aged 50-59 increased by 10% between 1979-1981 and 1996-1998, and then fell by 23% between 1996-1998 and 2011-2013.

Ovarian Cancer (C56-C57.4), European Age-Standardised Incidence Rates, by Age, Females, Great Britain, 1979-2013

ASR calculated with ESP2013. Not comparable with ASRs calculated with ESP1976.

References

  1. Data were provided by the Office for National Statistics on request, July 2015. Similar data can be found here: http://www.ons.gov.uk/ons/rel/vsob1/cancer-statistics-registrations--england--series-mb1-/index.html.
  2. Data were provided by ISD Scotland on request, April 2015. Similar data can be found here: http://www.isdscotland.org/Health-Topics/Cancer/Publications/index.asp.
  3. Data were provided by the Welsh Cancer Intelligence and Surveillance Unit on request, February 2015. Similar data can be found here:http://www.wales.nhs.uk/sites3/page.cfm?orgid=242&pid=59080.
  4. Data were provided by the Northern Ireland Cancer Registry on request, March 2015. Similar data can be found here: http://www.qub.ac.uk/research-centres/nicr/.
  5. UK Association of Cancer Registries. Library of recommendations on cancer coding and classification policy and practice. Accessed May 2013.
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Staging completeness for ovarian cancer is moderate in England, with 85% of ovarian cancers recorded with a known stage at diagnosis in 2014.[1]

Ovarian Cancer (C56), Proportion of Cases Diagnosed at Each Stage, England 2014

More females with a known stage are diagnosed at an advanced stage (58% diagnosed at stage III or IV) than an early stage (42% diagnosed at stage I or II). Around a fifth (21%) of females have metastases Open a glossary item at diagnosis (stage IV).[1]

References

  1. National Cancer Intelligence Network. Stage Breakdown by CCG 2014. London: NCIN; 2016.

About this data

Data is for: England, 2014, ICD-10 C56

Stage at diagnosis data is not yet routinely available for the UK due to inconsistencies in the collecting and recording of staging data in the past.

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80-90% of ovarian malignancies are epithelial  in origin, with the most common type in the UK being serous carcinomas.[1-3] Other rarer subtypes include germ cell tumours Open a glossary item, which tend to occur in pre-menopausal women and are very chemo-sensitive (and hence treatable). It is thought that most histologies share common risk factors, with the probable exception of mucinous carcinomas.[1,4]

The most striking international difference occurs in Japan, which has lower rates of ovarian cancer than in Europe.[5] Some of this variation may be explained by geographical differences in histologies, since Japan has a higher percentage of clear cell adenocarcinomas Open a glossary item (20-25%) compared with other Asian or Western countries (5-10%).[6]

References

  1. Granstrom C, Sundquist J, Hemminki K. Population attributable fractions for ovarian cancer in Swedish women by morphological type. Br J Cancer 2008;98:199-205.
  2. DeVita VT, Lawrence TS, Rosenberg SA, eds. Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology. 8th edition. Philadephia, USA: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2008.
  3. McCluggage WG. My approach to and thoughts on the typing of ovarian carcinomas. Journal of Clinical Pathology 2008;61:152-63.
  4. Purdie DM, Webb PM, Siskind V, et al. The different etiologies of mucinous and nonmucinous epithelial ovarian cancers. Gynecol Oncol 2003;88:S145-8.
  5. Ferlay J, Shin HR, Bray F, et al. GLOBOCAN 2008 v1.2, Cancer Incidence and Mortality Worldwide. IARC Cancerbase No,10 [Internet] Lyon, France: International Agency for Research on Cancer, 2010. Available from: http://globocan.iarc.fr.
  6. Ushijima K. Current status of gynecologic cancer in Japan. J Gynecol Oncol 2009;20:67-71.
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The lifetime risk of developing ovarian cancer is 1 in 52 for women, in 2012 in the UK.[1]

The lifetime risk for ovarian cancer has been calculated to account for the possibility that someone can have more than one diagnosis of ovarian cancer over the course of their lifetime (‘Adjusted for Multiple Primaries’ (AMP) method).[2]

References

  1. Lifetime risk estimates calculated by the Statistical Information Team at Cancer Research UK. Based on data provided by the Office of National Statistics, ISD Scotland, the Welsh Cancer Intelligence and Surveillance Unit and the Northern Ireland Cancer Registry, on request, December 2013 to July 2014.
  2. Sasieni PD, Shelton J, Ormiston-Smith N, et al. What is the lifetime risk of developing cancer?: The effect of adjusting for multiple primaries. Br J Cancer, 2011. 105(3): p. 460-5.
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There is no evidence for an association between ovarian cancer incidence and deprivation in England.[1] England-wide data for 2006-2010 show European age-standardised Open a glossary item incidence rates are similar for females living in the most deprived areas compared with the least deprived.[1]

Ovarian Cancer (C56-C57), European Age-Standardised Incidence Rates by Deprivation Quintile, Females, England, 2006-2010

The estimated deprivation gradient in ovarian cancer incidence between females living in the most and least deprived areas in England has not changed in the period 1996-2010.[1]

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Age-standardised Open a glossary item rates for White females with ovarian cancer (ICD-10 C56 only) range from 17.4 to 18.1 per 100,000. Rates for Asian females are significantly lower, ranging from 9.2 to 15.5 per 100,000 and the rates for Black females are also significantly lower, ranging from 6.6 to 12.1 per 100,000.[1]

Ranges are given because of the analysis methodology used to account for missing and unknown data. For ovarian cancer, 28,023 cases were identified; 22% had no known ethnicity.

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In the UK around 25,100 women were still alive at the end of 2006, up to ten years after being diagnosed with ovarian cancer.[1]

Ovarian Cancer (C56-C57), One, Five and Ten Year Cancer Prevalence, UK, 31st December 2006

1 Year Prevalence 5 Year Prevalence 10 Year Prevalence
Female 4,516 15,794 25,066

Worldwide, it is estimated that there were around 550,000 women still alive in 2008, up to five years after their diagnosis.[2]

References

  1. National Cancer Intelligence Network (NCIN). One, Five and Ten-Year Cancer Prevalence. London: NCIN; 2010.
  2. Ferlay J, Shin HR, Bray F, et al. GLOBOCAN 2008 v1.2, Cancer Incidence and Mortality Worldwide. IARC Cancerbase No,10 [Internet] Lyon, France: International Agency for Research on Cancer, 2010. Available from: http://globocan.iarc.fr.
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Ovarian cancer (C56 only) is the fifth most common cancer in Europe for females, and the 13th most common cancer overall, with around 65,600 new cases diagnosed in 2012 (4% of female cases and 2% of the total). In Europe (2012), the highest World age-standardised Open a glossary item incidence rate for ovarian cancer are in Latvia; the lowest are in Albania. UK ovarian cancer incidence rates are estimated to be the ninth highest in Europe.[1] These data are broadly in line with Europe-specific data available elsewhere.[2]

Ovarian cancer (C56 only) is the seventh most common cancer worldwide for females, and the 18th most common cancer overall, with nearly 239,000 new cases diagnosed in 2012 (4% of female cases and 2% of the total). Ovarian cancer incidence rates are highest in Central and Eastern Europe and lowest in Western Africa, but this partly reflects varying data quality worldwide.[1]

Variation between countries may reflect different prevalence of risk factors, use of screening, and diagnostic methods.

References

  1. Ferlay J, Soerjomataram I, Ervik M, et al. GLOBOCAN 2012 v1.0, Cancer Incidence and Mortality Worldwide: IARC CancerBase No. 11 [Internet]. Lyon, France: International Agency for Research on Cancer; 2013. Available from:http://globocan.iarc.fr, accessed December 2013.
  2. Ferlay J, Steliarova-Foucher E, Lortet-Tieulent J, et al.Cancer incidence and mortality patterns in Europe: Estimates for 40 countries in 2012. European Journal of Cancer (2013) 49, 1374-1403.
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