In situ cervical carcinoma incidence statistics

Cases

New cases of in situ cervical carcinoma, 2013, UK

 

Age

Age that more than half of in situ cervical carcinoma cases are diagnosed, 2011-2013, UK

 

Trend since 1970s

In situ cervical carcinoma incidence rates have increased since the late 1970s, GB

 

In 2013, there were 31,318 new cases of in situ cervical carcinoma in the UK.[1-4] The crude incidence rate shows that there are 96 new in situ cervical carcinoma cancer cases for every 100,000 females in the UK.

The European age-standardised incidence rates Open a glossary item (AS rate) are significantly lower in England compared with Wales and Northern Ireland, and significantly higher in Wales than the other UK countries.[1-4] Rates in Scotland are significantly lower compared with Northern Ireland.[1-4]. Wales and Northern Ireland include all cases of in situ cervical carcinoma, whereas Scotland and England include only those which have been confirmed by a pathologist. This contributes to the differences seen between countries.   

In Situ Cervical Carcinoma (D06), Number of New Cases, Crude and European Age-Standardised (AS) Incidence Rates per 100,000 Population, Females, UK, 2013

England Wales Scotland Northern Ireland UK
Cases 25,616 2,025 2,581 1,096 31,318
Crude Rate 93.7 129.2 94.2 117.5 96.1
AS Rate 88.9 133.9 92.0 113.0 92.0
AS Rate - 95% LCL 87.8 128.1 88.5 106.3 91.0
AS Rate - 95% UCL 90.0 139.8 95.6 119.7 93.0

95% LCL and 95% UCL are the 95% lower and upper confidence limits Open a glossary item around the AS rate Open a glossary item
 
ASR calculated with ESP2013. Not comparable with ASRs calculated with ESP1976.
 

References

  1. Data were provided by the Office for National Statistics on request, July 2015. Similar data can be found here: http://www.ons.gov.uk/ons/rel/vsob1/cancer-statistics-registrations--england--series-mb1-/index.html.
  2. Data were provided by ISD Scotland on request, April 2015. Similar data can be found here: http://www.isdscotland.org/Health-Topics/Cancer/Publications/index.asp.  
  3. Data were provided by the Welsh Cancer Intelligence and Surveillance Unit on request, February 2015. Similar data can be found here: http://www.wales.nhs.uk/sites3/page.cfm?orgid=242&pid=59080.
  4. Data were provided by the Northern Ireland Cancer Registry on request, March 2015. Similar data can be found here: http://www.qub.ac.uk/research-centres/nicr/
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In situ cervical carcinoma incidence is strongly related to age, with the highest incidence rates overall being in younger females – the converse pattern to most cancers.[1-4] In the UK in 2011-2013, on average each year more than half (53%) of cases were diagnosed in females aged under 30.

Age-specific incidence rates rise sharply from around age 15-19, peak in the 25-29 age group, and subsequently drop sharply to age 65-69.

In Situ Cervical Carcinoma (D06), Average Number of New Cases per Year and Age-Specific Incidence Rates, Females, UK, 2011-2013

The age distribution of in situ cervical carcinoma cases largely reflects the age groups eligible for cervical screening in the UK.

References

  1. Data were provided by the Office for National Statistics on request, July 2015. Similar data can be found here: http://www.ons.gov.uk/ons/rel/vsob1/cancer-statistics-registrations--england--series-mb1-/index.html.  
  2. Data were provided by ISD Scotland on request, April 2015. Similar data can be found here: http://www.isdscotland.org/Health-Topics/Cancer/Publications/index.asp.  
  3. Data were provided by the Welsh Cancer Intelligence and Surveillance Unit on request, February 2015. Similar data can be found here: http://www.wales.nhs.uk/sites3/page.cfm?orgid=242&pid=59080.  
  4. Data were provided by the Northern Ireland Cancer Registry on request, March 2015. Similar data can be found here: http://www.qub.ac.uk/research-centres/nicr/
Last reviewed:

In situ cervical carcinoma incidence rates have increased by 339% in females in Great Britain since the late 1970s.[1-3] This includes a rapid increase followed by a slower increase during this time.

European age-standardised (AS) Open a glossary item incidence rates increased by 192% between 1979-1981 and 1985-1987, then increased by 32% between 1986-1988 and 2011-2013.[1-3]

In Situ Cervical Carcinoma (D06), European Age-Standardised Incidence Rates, Females, Great Britain, 1979-2013

ASR calculated with ESP2013. Not comparable with ASRs calculated with ESP1976.

Over the last decade in the UK (between 2002-2004 and 2011-2013), in situ cervical carcinoma incidence rates in females have increased by 16%.[1-4] The transient increase around 2009 reflects increased cervical screening attendance following the cervical cancer death of a young celebrity.[5]

In Situ Cervical Carcinoma (D06), European Age-Standardised Incidence Rates, Females, UK, 1993-2013

ASR calculated with ESP2013. Not comparable with ASRs calculated with ESP1976.

In situ cervical carcinoma incidence trends probably reflect the effective implementation of the UK cervical screening programmes in the late 1980s.[6] Cervical screening aims to prevent cancer developing by detecting early-stage cell changes, hence increased incidence rates of in situ cervical carcinoma. Changing prevalence of risk factors probably also plays a part, particularly among younger women in more recent years.[7-10]

In situ cervical carcinoma incidence rates have overall increased for all of the broad age groups in Great Britain since the late 1970s.[1-3] The largest increase has been in females aged 25-34, with European AS incidence rates steadily increasing more than six-fold (517% increase) between 1979-1981 and 2011-2013. In females aged 20-24, rates increased more than 13-fold (1216% increase) between 1979-1981 and 2002-2004, followed by a 59% decrease between 2002-2004 and 2011-2013.[1-3]

In Situ Cervical Carcinoma (D06), European Age-Standardised Incidence Rates, Females, by Age, Great Britain, 1979-2013

ASR calculated with ESP2013. Not comparable with ASRs calculated with ESP1976.

References

  1. Data were provided by the Office for National Statistics on request, July 2015. Similar data can be found here: http://www.ons.gov.uk/ons/rel/vsob1/cancer-statistics-registrations--england--series-mb1-/index.html.  
  2. Data were provided by ISD Scotland on request, April 2015. Similar data can be found here: http://www.isdscotland.org/Health-Topics/Cancer/Publications/index.asp.   
  3. Data were provided by the Welsh Cancer Intelligence and Surveillance Unit on request, April 2014. Similar data can be found here: http://www.wales.nhs.uk/sites3/page.cfm?orgid=242&pid=59080.
  4. Data were provided by the Northern Ireland Cancer Registry on request, March 2015. Similar data can be found here: http://www.qub.ac.uk/research-centres/nicr/
  5. Lancucki L, Sasieni P, Patnick J, et al. The impact of Jade Goody's diagnosis and death on the NHS Cervical Screening Programme. J Med Screen 2012;19(2):89-93.
  6. Quinn M, Babb P, Jones J, Allen E. Effect of screening on incidence of and mortality from cancer of cervix in England: evaluation based on routinely collected statistics. BMJ 1999 3;318(7188):904-8
  7. NHS Cancer Screening Programmes. Audit of invasive cervical cancer, National report 2007-2011. May 2012.
  8. National Cancer Intelligence Network (NCIN). Cervical Cancer Incidence and Screening Coverage. London: NCIN; 2011.  
  9. Patel A, Galaal K, Burnley C, et al. Cervical cancer incidence in young women: a historical and geographic controlled UK regional population study. Br J Cancer 2012;106(11):1753-9.
  10. Foley G, Alston R, Geraci M, et al. Increasing rates of cervical cancer in young women in England: an analysis of national data 1982-2006. Br J Cancer 2011;105(1):177-84.
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