Cancer mortality for common cancers

Common cancers

Almost half of all cancer deaths are lung, bowel, breast or prostate cancer, 2014, UK

 

Males

Almost half of all cancer deaths in males are from lung, prostate or bowel cancer, 2014, UK

 

Females

Almost half of all cancer deaths in females are from lung, breast or bowel cancer, 2014, UK

 

Lung cancer is by far the most common cause of cancer death in the UK, accounting for more than a fifth (22%) of all cancer deaths in males and females combined (2014).[1-3] The next most common causes of cancer death in UK people are bowel (10%), breast (7%) and prostate (7%) cancers. Though there are more than 200 types of cancer, just these four types – lung, bowel, breast and prostate – together account for almost half (46%) of all cancer deaths in the UK (2014).[1-3] Two of these types occur mainly or exclusively in only one sex.

The 20 Most Common Causes of Cancer Deaths, UK, 2014

Data in this chart do not sum to the all cancers combined total provided elsewhere, because 'Brain, other CNS (central nervous system) and intracranial' includes tumours that are malignant, benign and of uncertain or unknown behaviour but only the malignant tumours are included in 'all cancers combined' total.

References

  1. Data were provided by the Office for National Statistics on request, November 2015. Similar data can be found here: https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/birthsdeathsandmarriages/deaths/bulletins/deathsregistrationsummarytables/previousReleases.
  2. Data were provided by the Information Services Division (ISD) Scotland on request, November 2015. Similar data can be found here: http://www.nrscotland.gov.uk/statistics-and-data/statistics/statistics-by-theme/vital-events/vital-events-reference-tables.
  3. Data were provided by the Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency on request, November 2015. Similar data can be found here: http://www.nisra.gov.uk/demography/default.asp2.htm.
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Lung cancer is by far the most common cause of cancer deaths in males accounting for almost a quarter (23%) of all male cancer deaths (2014).[1-3] The next most common causes of cancer death in UK males are prostate (13%) and bowel (10%) cancers. Lung, prostate and bowel cancers– together account for almost half (46%) of all male cancer deaths in the UK. Bladder, stomach and liver cancers are among the UK top ten most common causes of cancer deaths in males, but not in females.

The 10 Most Common Causes of Cancer Death in Males, UK, 2014

10 Most common cancers males

Data in this chart do not sum to the all cancers combined total provided elsewhere, because 'Brain, other CNS (central nervous system) and intracranial' includes tumours that are malignant, benign and of uncertain or unknown behaviour but only the malignant tumours are included in 'all cancers combined' total.

Most Common Causes of Cancer Death in Males, Percentages of All Cancer Deaths (C00-C97), UK, 2014

3 most common cancers males

References

  1. Data were provided by the Office for National Statistics on request, November 2015. Similar data can be found here: https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/birthsdeathsandmarriages/deaths/bulletins/deathsregistrationsummarytables/previousReleases.
  2. Data were provided by the Information Services Division (ISD) Scotland on request, November 2015. Similar data can be found here: http://www.nrscotland.gov.uk/statistics-and-data/statistics/statistics-by-theme/vital-events/vital-events-reference-tables.
  3. Data were provided by the Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency on request, November 2015. Similar data can be found here: http://www.nisra.gov.uk/demography/default.asp2.htm.
Last reviewed:

Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer death in UK females, accounting for around a fifth (21%) of all female cancer deaths (2014).[1-3] The next most common causes of cancer death in UK females are breast cancer (15%) and bowel cancer (10%). Lung, breast and bowel cancers together account for nearly half (46%) of all female cancer deaths in the UK. Two of the UK ten most common causes of female cancer death are sex-specific (uterus and ovary), compared with just one of the ten most common in males (prostate). Non-Hodgkin lymphoma and breast cancer are among the UK ten most common causes of cancer death in females, but not in males.

The 10 Most Common Causes of Cancer Death in Females, UK, 2012

10 Most common females

Data in this chart do not sum to the all cancers combined total provided elsewhere, because 'Brain, other CNS (central nervous system) and intracranial' includes tumours that are malignant, benign and of uncertain or unknown behaviour but only the malignant tumours are included in 'all cancers combined' total.

Most Common Causes of Cancer Death in Females, Percentages of All Cancer Deaths (C00-C97), UK, 2012

3 Most common feamles

References

  1. Data were provided by the Office for National Statistics on request, November 2015. Similar data can be found here: https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/birthsdeathsandmarriages/deaths/bulletins/deathsregistrationsummarytables/previousReleases.
  2. Data were provided by the Information Services Division (ISD) Scotland on request, November 2015. Similar data can be found here: http://www.nrscotland.gov.uk/statistics-and-data/statistics/statistics-by-theme/vital-events/vital-events-reference-tables.
  3. Data were provided by the Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency on request, November 2015. Similar data can be found here: http://www.nisra.gov.uk/demography/default.asp2.htm.
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Mortality trends over the last decade in the UK vary by cancer type and sex.[1-3] The trends largely reflect changes in incidence and survival, e.g. increased incidence without sufficient survival improvement results in increased mortality.

Liver cancer has shown the fastest increase in mortality (within the current 20 most common UK causes of cancer death) over the past decade in the UK for both males and females. Liver cancer mortality rates have increased by 53% in males and 59% in females over the past decade in the UK.

The second and third fastest-increasing causes of UK cancer death are malignant melanoma and oral cancer for males, and mesothelioma and oral cancers for females.

Stomach cancer has shown the fastest decrease in mortality (within the current 20 most common UK causes of cancer death) over the past decade in the UK for both males and females. Stomach cancer mortality rates have decreased by 32% in males and 31% in females over the past decade in the UK.

The second and third fastest-decreasing causes of UK cancer death are lung and bowel cancers for males, and cervix and breast cancers for females.

Lung cancer is the only cancer type in which the mortality trend differs between the sexes (among cancer types which appear in the current 20 most common UK causes of cancer death for both sexes). In males lung cancer mortality has decreased, while in females it has increased.

The 20 Most Common Causes of Cancer Death 2014, Percentage Change in European Age-Standardised Three Year Average Mortality Rates, Males, UK, 2003-2005 and 2012-2014

The 20 Most Common Causes of Cancer Death 2014, Percentage Change in European Age-Standardised Three Year Average Mortality Rates, Females, UK 2003-2005 and 2012-2014

Infographic showing 20 most common cancers in females

References

  1. Data were provided by the Office for National Statistics on request, November 2015. Similar data can be found here: https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/birthsdeathsandmarriages/deaths/bulletins/deathsregistrationsummarytables/previousReleases.
  2. Data were provided by the Information Services Division (ISD) Scotland on request, November 2015. Similar data can be found here: http://www.nrscotland.gov.uk/statistics-and-data/statistics/statistics-by-theme/vital-events/vital-events-reference-tables.
  3. Data were provided by the Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency on request, November 2015.Similar data can be found here: http://www.nisra.gov.uk/demography/default.asp2.htm.
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There are relatively few cancer types where European age-standardised mortality rates differ significantly between UK constituent countries. Such differences are often due to variation in incidence rates. Between-country variation is discussed on the types of cancer pages.

The four most common causes of cancer death are the same in all the UK constituent countries – lung, bowel, breast and prostate.[1-3]. Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer deaths in all the UK countries, and bowel cancer is second most common. Breast cancer is the third most common cause of cancer death in all UK countries except for Wales, in which prostate cancer is the third most common.

References

  1. Data were provided by the Office for National Statistics on request, November 2015. Similar data can be found here: https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/birthsdeathsandmarriages/deaths/bulletins/deathsregistrationsummarytables/previousReleases.
  2. Data were provided by the Information Services Division (ISD) Scotland on request, November 2015. Similar data can be found here: http://www.nrscotland.gov.uk/statistics-and-data/statistics/statistics-by-theme/vital-events/vital-events-reference-tables.
  3. Data were provided by the Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency on request, November 2015. Similar data can be found here: http://www.nisra.gov.uk/demography/default.asp2.htm.
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Local Cancer Statistics

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Cancer Statistics Explained

See information and explanations on terminology used for statistics and reporting of cancer, and the methods used to calculate some of our statistics.

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