Cancer incidence for all cancers combined

Cases

New cases of cancer, 2013, UK

 

Higher in men

Incidence rate is higher in males than in females, 2013, UK

 

Trend over time

Cancer incidence rates have increased since the late 1970s, GB

 

In 2013, there were 352,197 new cases of cancer in the UK: 179,443 (51%) in males and 172,754 (49%) in females, giving a male:female ratio of around 1:1.[1-4] The crude incidence rate Open a glossary item shows that there are 569 cases for every 100,000 males in the UK, and 530 for every 100,000 females. 

The European age-standardised incidence rate Open a glossary item (AS rate) in males, is significantly higher in Wales compared with England and Northern Ireland, and significantly higher in Scotland compared with Northern Ireland.[1-4] Rates for females are significantly higher in Scotland than all other constituent countries of the UK, and significantly higher in Wales than in England and Northern Ireland.[1-4]

All Cancers Excluding Non-Melanoma Skin Cancer (C00-C97 Excl. C44), Number of New Cases, Crude and European Age-Standardised (AS) Incidence Rates per 100,000 population, UK, 2013

England Wales Scotland Northern Ireland UK
Male Cases 149,818 9,808 15,382 4,435 179,443
Crude Rate 564.6 647.3 594.7 494.3 569.1
AS Rate 683.1 707.7 696.5 661.1 685.0
AS Rate - 95% LCL 679.7 693.7 685.5 641.7 681.9
AS Rate - 95% UCL 686.6 721.7 707.6 680.6 688.2
Female Cases 142,862 9,218 16,250 4,424 172,754
Crude Rate 522.7 588.2 592.8 474.4 530.4
AS Rate 542.2 562.6 590.2 531.1 547.3
AS Rate - 95% LCL 539.4 551.1 581.1 515.5 544.8
AS Rate - 95% UCL 545.0 574.1 599.2 546.8 549.9
Persons Cases 292,680 19,026 31,632 8,859 352,197
Crude Rate 543.4 617.2 593.7 484.2 549.4
AS Rate 601.2 623.4 631.4 583.6 604.6
AS Rate - 95% LCL 599.0 614.6 624.5 571.5 602.6
AS Rate - 95% UCL 603.3 632.3 638.4 595.8 606.6

95% LCL and 95% UCL are the 95% lower and upper confidence limits Open a glossary item around the AS rate Open a glossary item

ASR calculated with ESP2013. Not comparable with ASRs calculated with ESP1976.

References

  1. Data were provided by the Office for National Statistics on request, July 2015. Similar data can be found here: http://www.ons.gov.uk/ons/rel/vsob1/cancer-statistics-registrations--england--series-mb1-/index.html
  2. Data were provided by ISD Scotland on request, April 2015. Similar data can be found here: http://www.isdscotland.org/Health-Topics/Cancer/Publications/index.asp
  3. Data were provided by the Welsh Cancer Intelligence and Surveillance Unit on request, February 2015. Similar data can be found here: http://www.wales.nhs.uk/sites3/page.cfm?orgid=242&pid=59080
  4. Data were provided by the Northern Ireland Cancer Registry on request, March 2015. Similar data can be found here: http://www.qub.ac.uk/research-centres/nicr/
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Incidence rates for all cancers combined have increased by 30% in Great Britain since the late 1970s.[1-3] This includes a larger overall increase for females than for males, and most of the increase happened before the late 1990s.

For males, European age-standardised Open a glossary item (AS) incidence rates increased by 17% between 1979-1981 and 2011-2013. For females, rates increased by 37% in this period, with almost this entire rise occurring before the late 1990s.[1-3]

All Cancers Excluding Non-Melanoma Skin Cancer (C00-C97 Excl. C44), European Age-Standardised Incidence Rates, Great Britain, 1979-2013

ASR calculated with ESP2013. Not comparable with ASRs calculated with ESP1976.

Over the last decade in the UK (between 2002-2004 and 2011-2013), AS incidence rates for all cancers combined have increased by 7% for males and females combined, with a larger increase for females (8%) than for males (3%).[1-4]

All Cancers Excluding Non-Melanoma Skin Cancer (C00-C97 Excl. C44), European Age-Standardised Incidence Rates, UK, 1993-2013

ASR calculated with ESP2013. Not comparable with ASRs calculated with ESP1976.

References

  1. Data were provided by the Office for National Statistics on request, July 2015. Similar data can be found here: http://www.ons.gov.uk/ons/rel/vsob1/cancer-statistics-registrations--england--series-mb1-/index.html
  2. Data were provided by ISD Scotland on request, April 2015. Similar data can be found here: http://www.isdscotland.org/Health-Topics/Cancer/Publications/index.asp
  3. Data were provided by the Welsh Cancer Intelligence and Surveillance Unit on request, February 2015. Similar data can be found here: http://www.wales.nhs.uk/sites3/page.cfm?orgid=242&pid=59080
  4. Data were provided by the Northern Ireland Cancer Registry on request, March 2015. Similar data can be found here: http://www.qub.ac.uk/research-centres/nicr/
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Staging completeness for all cancer is moderate in England, with 69% of all cancers recorded with a known stage at diagnosis in 2013.[1]

All Cancers (C00-C97 excl C44), Proportion of Cases Diagnosed at Each Stage, England 2013

More people with a known stage are diagnosed at an early stage (54% diagnosed at stage I or II) than an advanced stage (46% diagnosed at stage III or IV). More than a quarter (27%) of people have metastases Open a glossary item at diagnosis (stage IV).[1]

References

  1. National Cancer Intelligence Network. Stage Breakdown by CCG 2013. London: NCIN; 2015.
Last reviewed:

More than two million people in the UK are estimated (in 2008) to be alive having previously been diagnosed with cancer.[1]

More than 200,000 cancer patients in the UK were alive one year after their diagnosis and around 1.13 million cancer patients in the UK were alive up to 10 years after their diagnosis (at the end of 2006).[2]

Prevalence figures are influenced by both incidence and survival so the most prevalent types of cancer are those with a relatively high incidence rate and a good prognosis. In the UK the most prevalent cancer in males is prostate cancer and in females it is breast cancer.

Prevalence is predicted to rise by more than 3% a year as more people are either living with, or surviving cancer.[1] This is mainly because incidence has been rising whilst the death rates have continued to fall, leading to better survival. This trend is expected to continue over the coming years as a result of a number of factors, including an ageing population, earlier detection of cancer and continued improvements in treatment.

Overall cancer prevalence in the UK (exc NMSC) at 31st Dec 2006

1 Year Prevalence 5 Year Prevalence 10 Year Prevalence
Male 98,726 339,971 507,840
Female 101,796 382,030 622,875
Persons 200,522 722,001 1,130,715

All malignant neoplasms diagnosed between 1997 and 2006.

Last reviewed:

The UK incidence rate for all cancers combined (excluding non-melanoma skin cancer) in males is lower (9%) than those in the European Union (284 and 311 per 100,000, respectively), but the rate is higher (11%) in females in the UK than those in the EU (267 and 241 per 100,000, respectively).[1]

References

  1. Ferlay J, Soerjomataram I, Ervik M, et al. GLOBOCAN 2012 v1.0, Cancer Incidence and Mortality Worldwide: IARC CancerBase No. 11 [Internet]. Lyon, France: International Agency for Research on Cancer; 2013. Available from: http://globocan.iarc.fr accessed August 2015.
 
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The incidence rate for all cancers combined (excluding non-melanoma skin cancer) for males in the UK is lower (8%) than in the more developed regions (MDRs) of the world (284 and 307 per 100,000, respectively), but is higher (11%) for females in the UK than in the MDRs (267 and 240 per 100,000, respectively).[1]

The incidence rates for all cancers combined (excluding non-melanoma skin cancer) for both sexes in the UK are higher (74% in males and 97% in females) than the less developed regions (LDRs) of the world (163 and 136 per 100,000 for males and females, respectively).[1]

The four most common types of cancer worldwide are also the most common types of cancer diagnosed in the UK.[1]

References

  1. Ferlay J, Soerjomataram I, Ervik M, et al. GLOBOCAN 2012 v1.0, Cancer Incidence and Mortality Worldwide: IARC CancerBase No. 11 [Internet]. Lyon, France: International Agency for Research on Cancer; 2013. Available from: http://globocan.iarc.fr accessed August 2015.
Last reviewed:

Local Cancer Statistics

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Cancer Statistics Explained

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