Alcohol statistics

Alcohol

Cancer cases linked to alcohol consumption, UK

Weekly consumption

Adults consume alcohol at least once a week, GB

Excess consumption

Adults exceeded the recommended daily alcohol limit at least once a week, GB

Alcohol drinking is associated with increased risk of several cancers, including oral cavity and pharynx, oesophageal, laryngeal, bowel, liver, and breast cancers.

Incidence of some alcohol-related cancers including oral, bowel and liver cancers is increasing, at least partly due to past increases in alcohol drinking.

Alcohol drinking caused an estimated 6% of deaths worldwide in 2012, 13% of which were due to cancer.[1] Alcohol drinking caused an estimated 5% of deaths in England in 2010, around half of which were due to cancer.[2] Reducing average alcohol intake in England by around one unit per person per day would avoid an estimated 8% of cancer deaths.[3] Alcohol drinking causes an estimated 4% of cancer cases in the UK each year.[4]

Last reviewed:

Nearly six in ten (58%) adults aged 16+ in Great Britain drank alcohol at least once in the past week (2012).[1] Almost two thirds (64%) of males and around half (52%) of females in Great Britain drank alcohol at least once in the past week.[1] Around one in ten adults in Great Britain drank alcohol on 5 or more days in the past week.REF:1]

Around half (53%) of adults aged 18+ in Northern Ireland drank alcohol at least once in the past week (2013). [2]

Alcohol Drinking Prevalence in the Past Week, Adults Aged 16 and Over, Countries of Great Britain, 2012

    England Wales Scotland Great Britain
Males At least once - - - 64
On 5+ days - - - 14
Females At least once - - - 52
On 5+ days - - - 9
Persons At least once 58 55 55 58
On 5+ days 12 8 9 11

References

  1. Office for National Statistics. Drinking Habits Amongst Adults, 2012. Accessed October 2014.
  2. Department of Health, Social Services and Public Safety Northern Ireland. Adult drinking patterns survey 2013. DHSSPSNI 2014. Accessed October 2014.
Last reviewed:

Under one in ten (9%) children aged 11-15 in England drank alcohol at least once in the past week (2013).[1] 9% of boys and 9% of girls in England drank alcohol at least once in the past week.[1]

Last reviewed:

Prevalence of drinking alcohol at least once in the past week among adults aged 16+ in Great Britain peaks in middle-aged adults (aged 45-64) (2012).[1] Prevalence of drinking alcohol at least once in the past week among adults aged 18+ in Northern Ireland varies little by age group in males and increases with age in females (2013).[2]

Alcohol Drinking Prevalence in the Past Week, by Age, Great Britain, 2012

Prevalence of drinking alcohol at least once in the past week among children aged 11-15 in England increases sharply with age (2013).[3]

References

  1. Office for National Statistics. Drinking Habits Amongst Adults, 2012. Accessed October 2014.
  2. Department of Health, Social Services and Public Safety Northern Ireland. Adult drinking patterns survey 2013. DHSSPSNI 2014. Accessed October 2014.
  3. Health & Social Care Information Centre. Smoking, drinking and drug use among young people in England – 2013. HSCIC 2014. Accessed October 2014.
Last reviewed:

Prevalence of drinking alcohol at least once in the past week among adults in Great Britain has decreased since 2005.[1] Prevalence of drinking alcohol at least once in the past week has been higher in males than females throughout this period.[1] The overall decline in prevalence of drinking alcohol at least once in the past week was mainly due to a decline among younger adults.[1] Prevalence of being an alcohol drinker (defined as drinker versus non-drinker) among adults in Northern Ireland increased slightly between 1999 and 2013.[2]

Alcohol Drinking Prevalence in the Past Week, Adults Aged 16 and Over, Great Britain, 2005-2012

Alcohol drinking data are not adjusted for population characteristics including age and ethnicity, which have also changed over time, and which relate to alcohol drinking; so comparison over time should be made with caution

Prevalence of drinking alcohol at least once in the past week among children aged 11-15 in England remained fairly stable between the late 1980s and early 2000s, and has decreased since 2003.[3]

References

  1. Office for National Statistics. Drinking Habits Amongst Adults, 2012. Accessed October 2014.
  2. Department of Health, Social Services and Public Safety Northern Ireland. Adult drinking patterns survey 2013. DHSSPSNI 2014. Accessed October 2014.
  3. Health & Social Care Information Centre. Smoking, drinking and drug use among young people in England – 2013. HSCIC 2014. Accessed October 2014.
Last reviewed:

Among those adults aged 16+ in Great Britain who drank alcohol at least once in the past week, 52% exceed the recommended daily alcohol limit on their heaviest drinking day (2012).[1] The proportion exceeding the recommended daily limit on their heaviest drinking day decreases with age.[1] The proportion of exceeding the recommended daily limit on their heaviest drinking day has decreased since 2005.[1] Among those adults aged 18+ in Northern Ireland who drank alcohol at least once in the past week, 71% of males and 58% of females exceed the recommended daily limit on at least one day in the week (2013).[2]

Among those children aged 11-15 in England who drank alcohol at least once in the past week, the average amount drunk in the week is around 8 units.[3]

References

  1. Office for National Statistics. Drinking Habits Amongst Adults, 2012. Accessed October 2014.
  2. Department of Health, Social Services and Public Safety Northern Ireland. Adult drinking patterns survey 2013. DHSSPSNI 2014. Accessed October 2014.
  3. Health & Social Care Information Centre. Smoking, drinking and drug use among young people in England – 2013. HSCIC 2014. Accessed October 2014.
Last reviewed:

Prevalence of drinking alcohol at least once in the past week among adults in Great Britain is higher among those in employment compared with those who are unemployed or economically inactive.[1]

Last reviewed:

Prevalence of drinking alcohol at least once in the past week among adults in Great Britain is higher among white people compared with non-white people.[1] Among those adults in Great Britain who drank alcohol at least once in the past week, the proportion exceeding the recommended daily alcohol limit is higher among white people compared with non-white people.[1]

Alcohol Drinking Prevalence in the Past Week, Adults Aged 16 and Over, By Ethnic Group, Great Britain, 2012

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Worldwide cancer incidence and mortality reflects alcohol drinking, among other factors.

Worldwide 38% of adults (aged 15 and over) are current alcohol drinkers, having drunk within the past 12 months (2010).[1] Among adults who are current alcohol drinkers, around 16% engage in heavy episodic drinking.[1]

Prevalence of current alcohol drinking varies widely around the world, with the highest proportions of current drinkers in the World Health Organization (WHO) European and Americas regions.[1]

Worldwide prevalence of current alcohol drinking decreased between 2005 and 2010 in the WHO European and Western Pacific Regions, but increased in all other WHO regions; however comparisons should be made cautiously due to methodological variation over time and between regions.[1]

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