A study to find out more about kidney cancer (TRACERx Renal)

Cancer type:

Kidney cancer
Renal cell cancer

Status:

Open

Phase:

Other

This is a study to find out more about how kidney cancer develops and how it spreads.

It is for people in one of the following situations you:

  • have a type of kidney cancer called renal cell cancer
  • are having surgery to remove your kidneys for another reason than cancer
  • have a cancer, that is not renal cell carcinoma, but is linked with a family history of a gene change (mutation Open a glossary item) that means you are more likely to get renal cell carcinoma

More about this trial

The main treatment for early kidney cancer is surgery. For some people their kidney cancer can come back after surgery. Why this happens isn’t understood.  

Doctors can use drug treatment to shrink or slow the growth of kidney cancer that has come back or spread to another part of the body. But over time they can stop working. And the drugs can have unwanted side effects. 

Researchers want to learn more about kidney cancer and why these things happen. In this study they will ask for people to give:

  • tissue samples
  • blood samples 
  • urine samples

They will look at the genes (DNA Open a glossary item) of the cancer cells in these samples to find out why:

  • kidney cancer comes back after surgery
  • it spreads to other parts of the body
  • drug treatments might stop working

Please note, you will not benefit directly from taking part in this study. But the results may help to improve our knowledge of cancer and improve cancer treatments in the future.

Who can enter

The following bullet points are a summary of the entry conditions for this study. Talk to your doctor or the study team if you are unsure about any of these. They will be able to advise you. 

Who can take part

You may be able to join this study if one of the following apply. You:

or  

  • are having surgery to remove your kidneys for another reason than cancer

or

  • have a cancer (not renal cell carcinoma) that is linked to a family history of a gene change (mutation Open a glossary item) that means you are more likely to get renal cell carcinoma

And both of the following apply. You are: 

  • having a standard treatment Open a glossary item
  • at least 18 years old

Who can’t take part

You cannot join this study if any of these apply.

  • You have another medical condition or mental health problem that could affect you taking part. 
  • There is not enough tissue from your surgery or tissue sample (biopsy Open a glossary item) available for the study team to access. 

Trial design

The study team need 672 people to take part. 

You give extra blood samples and urine samples as part of this study. Where possible these are taken when you have routine blood and urine samples done. 

You also give permission for the trial team to access samples of tissue (biopsy) you have taken. This includes tissue taken out if you have surgery in the future or had surgery in the past. 

We have information about what to expect when having a kidney biopsy

Optional extra tissue samples
Depending on where you are with your treatment the team may ask you to give some extra cancer tissue samples. Where possible they will take the samples when you are having tissue samples taken as part of your routine care. This could be:

  • before starting treatment
  • during treatment 
  • after finishing treatment

You don’t have to agree to give these extra tissue samples. 

Researchers now and in the future will use these samples to look at the DNA of kidney cancer cells. They hope to learn more about kidney cancer and to gain better understanding as to why some treatments do or do not work.

CAPTURE Sub study

In this sub study the team looked at how well COVID-19 vaccines worked for people with cancer. We have the results of the CAPTURE sub study.

Hospital visits

There are no extra hospital visits if you take part.

Side effects

After having a sample of tissue (biopsy) taken you might have:

  • pain or discomfort 
  • soreness and redness
  • swelling
  • bleeding and bruising
  • a drainage tube from the site
  • high temperature (fever)
  • an infection
  • a problem with the wound healing
  • an allergic reaction to the local anaesthetic

Location

London

Recruitment start:

Recruitment end:

How to join a clinical trial

Please note: In order to join a trial you will need to discuss it with your doctor, unless otherwise specified.

Please note - unless we state otherwise in the summary, you need to talk to your doctor about joining a trial.

Chief Investigator

Dr Samra Turajlic

Supported by

The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust
National Institute for Health Research (NIHR)

Freephone 0808 800 4040

Last review date

CRUK internal database number:

17762

Please note - unless we state otherwise in the summary, you need to talk to your doctor about joining a trial.

Cara took part in a clinical trial

A picture of Cara

"I am glad that taking part in a trial might help others on their own cancer journey.”

Last reviewed:

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