A trial looking at cabazitaxel for prostate cancer that has started to get worse after having hormone therapy and docetaxel (CANTATA)

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Cancer type:

Prostate cancer

Status:

Results

Phase:

Phase 2

This trial wanted to compare the chemotherapy drugs cabazitaxel and docetaxel for prostate cancer that has spread to other parts of the body. The men had prostate cancer that started to get worse after having both hormone therapy and docetaxel. 

This trial was supported by Cancer Research UK.

More about this trial

If prostate cancer has spread outside the prostate gland, doctors often treat it with hormone therapy. This can work very well, but at some stage the cancer may start to grow again.
 
Doctors can treat prostate cancer that is no longer responding to hormone therapy with chemotherapy. Docetaxel is a chemotherapy drug they often use. If prostate cancer comes back after having docetaxel, you may have the drug again. Doctors call this a re-challenge.
 
Cabazitaxel is another chemotherapy drug that doctors can use for men with prostate cancer who have had hormone treatment and docetaxel.
 
In this trial, researchers compared cabazitaxel and a docetaxel re-challenge for prostate cancer that has spread and is now getting worse after having hormone therapy and docetaxel.
 
Many of the men that took part had docetaxel at the same time as hormone therapy in another prostate cancer trial called STAMPEDE. But other men who had docetaxel for prostate cancer that is no longer responding to hormone therapy also took part.
 
The aims of the trial were to:
  • see which treatment helps men more
  • learn more about the side effects

Results

This trial closed early as the researchers were unable to find enough suitable people to take part.

Recruitment start:

Recruitment end:

How to join a clinical trial

Please note: In order to join a trial you will need to discuss it with your doctor, unless otherwise specified.

Please note - unless we state otherwise in the summary, you need to talk to your doctor about joining a trial.

Chief Investigator

Professor Nick James

Supported by

Cancer Research UK
Experimental Cancer Medicine Centre (ECMC)
NIHR Clinical Research Network: Cancer
Sanofi
University of Birmingham

Other information

This is Cancer Research UK trial number CRUKE/12/031.

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Last review date

CRUK internal database number:

10087

Please note - unless we state otherwise in the summary, you need to talk to your doctor about joining a trial.

Keith took part in a trial looking into hormone therapy

A picture of Keith

"Health wise I am feeling great. I am a big supporter of trials - it allows new treatments and drugs to be brought in.”

Last reviewed:

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