A study looking at circulating tumour DNA for non small cell lung cancer (LUCID)

Please note - this trial is no longer recruiting patients. We hope to add results when they are available.

Cancer type:

Lung cancer
Non small cell lung cancer

Status:

Closed

Phase:

Pilot

This study is looking at pieces of genetic material in the bloodstream called circulating tumour DNA. DNA is the genetic code that controls how the body’s cells behave. Researchers have discovered that cancer cells release small pieces of DNA Open a glossary item into the bloodstream.

This study is for people who have stage 1,2 or 3 non small cell lung cancer, who are due to have treatment with the aim of curing their disease (radical treatment Open a glossary item).

More about this trial

Circulating tumour DNA can be detected in most people with advanced (stage 4) lung cancer.  Researchers think that testing for and measuring circulating tumour DNA in earlier stage cancer could potentially help doctors to

  • find cancers earlier
  • decide which treatments to use
  • find out how well treatment is working

This study wants to find out if circulating tumour DNA is detected in earlier stage lung cancers. 

In this study, you have regular blood tests before, during and after your treatment. The study team also look at any samples of your cancer taken when you were first diagnosed, and as part of your treatment and follow up.

The aims of this study are to

  • find out if it possible to test for circulating tumour DNA in people with non small cell lung cancer who are due to have radical treatment
  • learn more about circulating tumour DNA in this group of people
  • find out if circulating tumour DNA can help to diagnose and predict how well treatment will work

Taking part in this study will not affect your treatment and you do not benefit directly from taking part. But the results may help people with non small cell lung cancer in the future.

Who can enter

The following bullet points list the entry conditions for this study. Talk to your doctor or the study team if you are unsure about any of these. They will be able to advise you.

You may be able to join this trial if all of the following apply. You

  • Have non small cell lung cancer
  • Have stage 1, stage 2 or stage 3 lung cancer
  • Are due to have radical treatment with the aim of curing your disease, such as surgery or radiotherapy (with or without chemotherapy)
  • Are well enough to be up and about for at least half the day (performance status 0, 1 or 2)
  • Are at least 18 years or older

You cannot join this trial if any of these apply. You

  • Are not able to have a blood test for any reason
  • Are not able to have radical treatment for some reason. For example, you are not well enough

Trial design

This is a pilot study. The researchers need 100 people to join. The people taking part are in 1 of 2 groups. This depends on which treatment you have.

  • Surgical group – you have an operation to remove your cancer, you may then have chemotherapy (adjuvant chemotherapy Open a glossary item)
  • Non surgical group- you have radiotherapy, with or without chemotherapy

Surgical group
As part of this study, you have blood samples taken

  • when you join the study
  • 1 to 3 days after your operation
  • after chemotherapy (if you have it)
  • every 3 months after treatment has finished for a total of 9 months

Non surgical group
As part of this study, you have blood samples taken

  • when you join the study
  • every week of your radiotherapy treatment and, or at beginning of every chemotherapy cycle
  • every 3 months after treatment has finished  for a total of 9 months

Both groups
The study team look at samples of any tissue (biopsies Open a glossary item) from

  • when you were first diagnosed
  • if you have an operation
  • if you have biopsies taken during the course of your treatment or follow up

They collect information from your medical notes about 

  • your medical history
  • results of any scans
  • the outcome of your treatment

Hospital visits

You do not have any extra hospital visits as a result of taking part in this study. Where possible, the study blood samples are taken at the same time as your routine blood tests.

You do not have any extra biopsies as part of this study. The study team only use samples of tissue taken as part of your routine care.

Side effects

This study does not involve a treatment and so there are no side effects associated with taking part.

Recruitment start:

Recruitment end:

How to join a clinical trial

Please note: In order to join a trial you will need to discuss it with your doctor, unless otherwise specified.

Please note - unless we state otherwise in the summary, you need to talk to your doctor about joining a trial.

Chief Investigator

Dr Nitzan Rosenfeld

Supported by

Cancer Research UK
Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust
NIHR Clinical Research Network: Cancer
Sociedad Española de Oncología Médica

Questions about cancer? Contact our information nurses

Freephone 0808 800 4040

Last review date

CRUK internal database number:

13914

Please note - unless we state otherwise in the summary, you need to talk to your doctor about joining a trial.

Around 1 in 5 people take part in clinical trials

3 phases of trials

Around 1 in 5 people diagnosed with cancer in the UK take part in a clinical trial.

Last reviewed:

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