A study to find more about the causes of breast implant associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma (BIA-ALCL)

Cancer type:

Blood cancers
Lymphoma
Non-Hodgkin lymphoma

Status:

Open

Phase:

Other

Breast implant associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma (BIA-ALCL) is a very rare type of lymphoma that might be caused by the implants. A lymphoma is a cancer of the lymphatic system.

This study is looking at tissue samples, breast implants and blood samples from women with breast implant associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma.

More about this trial

Breast implant associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma (BIA-ALCL) might cause either:

  • a lump 
  • swelling caused by a liquid tumour 

In most cases this cancer can be successfully treated by removing the implant.

Doctors want to find out more about BIA-ALCL. In this study they will ask you for a sample of blood and any cancer tissue you may have removed during routine procedures. 

Researchers will look at both abnormal and normal cells in these samples in the laboratory. They will look for genes that help the cancer cells to survive. 

They will also look at proteins and sugars to see if these might help the cancer cells to survive.

The researchers will try to grow the cancer cells in the laboratory. They want to try various types of chemotherapy to monitor how the cells respond to these treatments.

The aim of this study is to understand more about how changes to certain genes, proteins and sugars could affect how BIA-ALCL develops.  This may help develop new treatments for this condition in future.

You will not have any direct benefit from taking part in this study, and it is unlikely to change your treatment plan in any way. But the results of the study will be used to help people with BIA-ALCL in the future.

Who can enter

You can enter this study if you have been diagnosed with breast implant associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma (BIA-ALCL). This is a very rare type of non Hodgkin lymphoma.

Trial design

The study team will ask for:

  • a blood sample
  • a sample of the cancer (tissue or fluid) from when you were diagnosed
  • the implant if it is removed 

They will use the blood sample to look to at the DNA in your genes. And use the tissue, or fluid, sample and the implant to find more about the cancer. 

They will try and grow the cancer in the lab using the sample of cancer tissue.

The team also need to look at your medical notes to find about:

  • why you had the breast implant done
  • when you had it done 
  • what type of implant it was
  • any previous treatment such as surgery, chemotherapy or radiotherapy
  • when you were diagnosed with BIA-ALCL and how bad it was

Hospital visits

You will not have to make any extra hospital visits, just those that are part of your routine treatment.

Side effects

As there are no treatments in this study, there are no side effects. 

Location

Cambridge
Chelmsford
Kettering
Leeds
Leicester
London
Manchester
Newcastle upon Tyne
Scotland

Recruitment start:

Recruitment end:

How to join a clinical trial

Please note: In order to join a trial you will need to discuss it with your doctor, unless otherwise specified.

Please note - unless we state otherwise in the summary, you need to talk to your doctor about joining a trial.

Chief Investigator

Dr Suzanne Turner

Supported by

Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust
University of Cambridge

Freephone 0808 800 4040

Last review date

CRUK internal database number:

14771

Please note - unless we state otherwise in the summary, you need to talk to your doctor about joining a trial.

Charlie took part in a trial to try new treatments

A picture of Charlie

“I think it’s really important that people keep signing up to these type of trials to push research forward.”

Last reviewed:

Rate this page:

Currently rated: 4.2 out of 5 based on 6 votes
Thank you!
We've recently made some changes to the site, tell us what you think