A trial of vandetanib alongside MIBG radio-targeted therapy for advanced phaeochromocytomas and paragangliomas (VIBRaNT)

Cancer type:

Neuroendocrine tumour (NET)

Status:

Results

Phase:

Phase 1

This trial looked at a drug called vandetanib alongside MIBG radio-targeted therapy for a rare type of neuroendocrine tumour.  The trial was supported by Cancer Research UK.

More about this trial

A phaeochromocytoma (pronounced (fey-oh-cromo-sy-toma) is a rare cancer that starts in the inner part of the adrenal gland (the adrenal medulla). The adrenal glands Open a glossary item are part of the hormone system and make hormones such as adrenaline. Tumours that start in cells that produce hormones can also be called neuroendocrine tumours.

Paragangliomas are another rare type of neuroendocrine tumour. They are similar to phaeochromocytomas, but start in other parts of the body.

If a phaeochromocytoma can’t be removed with surgery, or has spread to another part of the body, doctors use a treatment called MIBG radio-targeted therapy.

MIBG is a chemical that is usually taken up by phaeochromocytoma cells. If you have this treatment, the MIBG is attached to a radioactive form of iodine. You have this as an injection into a vein and it circulates in your bloodstream. It is taken up by the cancer cells wherever they are in your body, and the radioactive iodine kills them.

Researchers are looking for ways to improve treatment. In this trial, they wanted to test a drug called vandetanib. It is a cancer growth blocker. It stops signals that cancer cells use to divide and grow.

The aim of the trial was to find the best dose of vandetanib to have alongside MIBG radio-targeted therapy for phaeochromocytomas and paragangliomas that can’t be completely removed with surgery.

Summary of results

This trial was never finished so there are no results available. The researchers were unable to recruit any patients.
 

Recruitment start:

Recruitment end:

How to join a clinical trial

Please note: In order to join a trial you will need to discuss it with your doctor, unless otherwise specified.

Please note - unless we state otherwise in the summary, you need to talk to your doctor about joining a trial.

Chief Investigator

Dr Christina Thirlwell
Dr Debashis Sarker

Supported by

AstraZeneca
Cancer Research UK
Experimental Cancer Medicine Centre (ECMC)
NIHR Clinical Research Network: Cancer
University College London (UCL)

Other information

This is Cancer Research UK trial number CRUKD/13/003.

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Freephone 0808 800 4040

Last review date

CRUK internal database number:

Oracle 10382

Please note - unless we state otherwise in the summary, you need to talk to your doctor about joining a trial.

Over 60,000 cancer patients enrolled on clinical trials in the UK last year.

Last reviewed:

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