A study to evaluate an age extension to the NHS Breast Screening Programme

Cancer type:

Breast cancer

Status:

Open

Phase:

Other

This study is looking at whether there are any risks or benefits to extending the age when women are invited for breast screening. 

More about this trial

At present, all women between the ages of 50 and 70 are invited for breast screening as part of the NHS Breast Screening Programme (NHSBSP). In this study the age range is being extended to include women between the ages of 47 and 49 and 71 to 73. Researchers hope to learn the risks and benefits of inviting women in these age ranges for additional screening. 

The age extension study to the NHSBSP is taking place in 65 Breast Screening Units across England. During the study, half the women between the ages of 47 to 49, and some women between the ages of 71 to 73 will be invited for breast screening.

Researchers will collect information about the number of women who are diagnosed with breast cancer and the number of women who die of the disease.

The aim of this study is to see if extending the age range of breast screening reduces deaths from breast cancer.

More information about this study is available on www.agex.uk.

Who can enter

You may be invited to enter this study if you

  • Are female and aged between 47 and 49 or between 71 and 73
  • Live in an area where the breast screening unit is involved in the study

Trial design

This study is taking place at 65 Breast Screening Units in England.  In these areas

  • Half the women between the ages of 47 and 49 will receive an invite for screening and the other half will not
  • Half the women between the ages of 71 and 73 will receive an invite, and the other half will not

It is a randomised study. Women are put into groups by a computer. You cannot decide which group you are in. But if you are aged between 47 and 49 and you live in an area where they have started the age extension, you can ask to be screened if you don’t receive an invite. Women over 70 can ask to have breast screening every 3 years wherever they live.

Hospital visits

If you receive an invite and decide to attend for screening, you will have at least 1 extra visit to the screening unit.

Side effects

Although having an extra mammogram Open a glossary item means you will be exposed to more X-rays, the NHSBSP says there is no current evidence to suggest that the risk of this exposure outweighs the benefits of breast screening.

We have more information about having a mammogram.

Location

National

Recruitment start:

Recruitment end:

How to join a clinical trial

Please note: In order to join a trial you will need to discuss it with your doctor, unless otherwise specified.

Please note - unless we state otherwise in the summary, you need to talk to your doctor about joining a trial.

Chief Investigator

Professor Julietta Patnick

Supported by

Public Health England
NHS Breast Screening Programme
University of Oxford

Questions about cancer? Contact our information nurses

Freephone 0808 800 4040

Last review date

CRUK internal database number:

9141

Please note - unless we state otherwise in the summary, you need to talk to your doctor about joining a trial.

Harriet wanted to try new treatments

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“I was keen to go on a clinical trial. I wanted to try new cancer treatments and hopefully help future generations.”

Last reviewed:

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