A study looking at the genetics of pituitary gland tumours

Cancer type:

Brain (and spinal cord) tumours
Neuroendocrine tumour (NET)

Status:

Open

Phase:

Other

This study is trying to find genes that may be important in the development of tumours in the pituitary gland.

Most tumours that start in the pituitary gland are adenomas which are non cancerous (benign). Some pituitary tumours make extra hormones that can cause symptoms. They are sometimes called neuroendocrine tumours.

Very rarely, several members of the same family have a pituitary gland tumour. We know from research that there can be a gene that is abnormal in some of these families. Researchers want to study this and other genes to understand more about how these tumours develop.

In this study, they will take blood samples from people who have a pituitary gland tumour, and from other family members.

The aim of the study is to identify genes that play a part in the development of pituitary gland tumours.

Please note - you won’t get any direct benefit from taking part in this study, nor will it affect any treatment you have. But may it help people in the future.

Who can enter

You can enter this trial if you have been diagnosed with a pituitary gland tumour and a member of your family also has (or has had) a pituitary gland tumour. If you are diagnosed before the age of 20, you may be asked to join the trial even if you don't have a relative who has had one of these tumours.

Trial design

The trial team will take a blood sample from everybody taking part in the study. They will use this to study your genes.

If you have surgery to remove a pituitary gland tumour, the researchers will also look at a sample of the tumour.

Hospital visits

Taking part in this study does not involve any extra hospital visits, apart from having the blood test.

Side effects

You may have some discomfort or bruising in the area where the blood sample is taken. There are no other side effects associated with taking part in this study.

Location

Aberdeen
Belfast
Birmingham
Bournemouth
Bristol
Cambridge
Cardiff
Cardiff
Chester
Derby
Edinburgh
Exeter
Gillingham
Ipswich
Leeds
Leicester
Liverpool
London
Manchester
Newcastle upon Tyne
Norwich
Nottingham
Oxford
Plymouth
Preston
Salford
Sheffield
Southampton
Southend on Sea
Stevenage
Stoke-on-Trent
Swindon
Wakefield

Recruitment start:

Recruitment end:

How to join a clinical trial

Please note: In order to join a trial you will need to discuss it with your doctor, unless otherwise specified.

Please note - unless we state otherwise in the summary, you need to talk to your doctor about joining a trial.

Chief Investigator

Marta Korbonits

Supported by

Barts Health NHS Trust
Barts and The London School of Medicine
National Institute for Health Research (NIHR)

Questions about cancer? Contact our information nurses

Freephone 0808 800 4040

Last review date

CRUK internal database number:

6501

Please note - unless we state otherwise in the summary, you need to talk to your doctor about joining a trial.

Charlie took part in a trial to try new treatments

A picture of Charlie

“I think it’s really important that people keep signing up to these type of trials to push research forward.”

Last reviewed:

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