A study looking at a way to check if chemotherapy is working for non Hodgkin lymphoma and Hodgkin lymphoma (BiLD)

Cancer type:

Blood cancers
High grade lymphoma
Hodgkin lymphoma
Low grade lymphoma
Lymphoma
Non-Hodgkin lymphoma

Status:

Results

Phase:

Other

This study compared MRI scans with PET-CT scans to see how well chemotherapy for non Hodgkin lymphoma and Hodgkin lymphoma was working.

This study was open between 2014 and 2017 for people to join. These results were written up in 2018. 

More about this trial

Doctors use chemotherapy to treat non Hodgkin lymphoma and Hodgkin lymphoma. During treatment they use CT scans or PET-CT scans to see if the treatment was working.

For these scans you need to have a small amount of radioactive substance Open a glossary item either as a drink or injection.

In this study the researchers wanted to see if they could use a particular  type of MRI scan called Diffusion Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging. It looks at the movement of water which shows up differently in cancer tissue and healthy tissue. So you don’t need to have any radioactive substance for this scan.  

The team wanted to see if the Diffusion Weighted Magnetic Resonance Scan could predict how well chemotherapy was working.

Summary of results

The researchers found that the MRI scan was able to show how well chemotherapy was working. 

About this study
11 people joined this study. Everyone had a PET-CT scan and an MRI scan:

  • before starting chemotherapy
  • 8 days later 
  • and 6 weeks after finishing chemotherapy 

Results
The researchers compared the PET-CT scans and the MRI scans of each person:

  • before starting chemotherapy
  • and 8 days later of each person 

They found that the PET-CT scans and the MRI scans at both times showed the same result for everyone.

Conclusion
These results suggest that an MRI scan was able to show how well chemotherapy worked. But the number of people in this study was small and a larger study with more people would confirm this. 

Where this information comes from    
We have based this summary on information from the research team.  As far as we are aware, the information they sent us has not been reviewed independently (peer reviewed Open a glossary item) or published in a medical journal yet. The figures we quote above were provided by the research team. We have not analysed the data ourselves.

Recruitment start:

Recruitment end:

How to join a clinical trial

Please note: In order to join a trial you will need to discuss it with your doctor, unless otherwise specified.

Please note - unless we state otherwise in the summary, you need to talk to your doctor about joining a trial.

Chief Investigator

Dr Shireen Kassam

Supported by

Elimination of Leukaemia Fund
King's College London
Kings College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust
NIHR Clinical Research Network: Cancer

Freephone 0808 800 4040

Last review date

CRUK internal database number:

12350

Please note - unless we state otherwise in the summary, you need to talk to your doctor about joining a trial.

Around 1 in 5 people take part in clinical trials

3 phases of trials

Around 1 in 5 people diagnosed with cancer in the UK take part in a clinical trial.

Last reviewed:

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