A study looking at using circulating tumour cells to diagnose pancreatic cancer

Coronavirus and cancer

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Please note - this trial is no longer recruiting patients. We hope to add results when they are available.

Cancer type:

Pancreatic cancer

Status:

Closed

Phase:

Other

This study is looking at using circulating tumour cells to try and diagnose pancreatic cancer early. Cancer cells, or parts of them, may break off from the pancreatic cancer and flow around the blood stream. These are called circulating tumour cells (CTCs).

The aim of this study is to develop a test that can detect CTCs of pancreatic cancer so that it can be diagnosed at an early stage.

Who can enter

The following bullet points list the entry conditions for this study. If you are unsure about any of these speak with your doctor or the study team. They will be able to advise you.

You may be able to join this study if you are at least 18 years old and have one of the following

You cannot join this study if you have HIV, hepatitis B or hepatitis C.

Trial design

The researchers need 250 people with pancreatic cancer and 650 people with other medical conditions, including other cancers, to join.

Your doctor or a nurse will tell you about the study when you go to your regular outpatient clinic appointment.

Everyone will have a blood sample taken. For some people they will ask them to give a number of blood samples on different clinic visits.

The team will also ask 100 healthy staff members of the hospital to volunteer.

The researchers are looking at the blood from these different groups of people so that they can compare the results and to make sure that using the test for people with pancreatic cancer will work and be useful.

Hospital visits

There are no extra visits if you agree to take part.

Side effects

You may have slight bleeding or discomfort from where the researcher takes the blood sample.

Recruitment start:

Recruitment end:

How to join a clinical trial

Please note: In order to join a trial you will need to discuss it with your doctor, unless otherwise specified.

Please note - unless we state otherwise in the summary, you need to talk to your doctor about joining a trial.

Chief Investigator

Andrew Gilliam

Supported by

Astrimmune
NIHR Clinical Research Network: Cancer
Paraytec
SBRI Healthcare

Freephone 0808 800 4040

Last review date

CRUK internal database number:

13366

Please note - unless we state otherwise in the summary, you need to talk to your doctor about joining a trial.

Charlie took part in a trial to try new treatments

A picture of Charlie

“I think it’s really important that people keep signing up to these type of trials to push research forward.”

Last reviewed:

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