Anal cancer mortality statistics

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Deaths

Deaths from anal cancer, 2015-2017, UK.

Percentage of all deaths

Percentage anal cancer contributes to total cancer deaths, 2015-2017, UK

Age

Peak mortality rate for anal cancer, 2015-2017, UK

Trend over time

Change in anal cancer mortality rates since the late 1970s, UK

Anal cancer is not among the 20 most common causes of cancer death in the UK, accounting for less than 1% of all cancer deaths (2017).[1-3]

In females in the UK, anal cancer is not among the 20 most common causes of cancer death (less than 1% of all female cancer deaths). In males in the UK it is not among the 20 most common causes of cancer death (less than 1% of all male cancer deaths).

64% of anal cancer deaths in the UK are in females, and 36% are in males.

Anal cancer mortality rates (European age-standardised (AS) rates) Open a glossary item for persons are significantly lower than the UK average in Northern Ireland, and similar to the UK average in all other UK constituent countries.

Anal Cancer (C21), Number of Deaths, Crude and European Age-Standardised (AS) Mortality Rates per 100,000 Population, UK, 2017

  England Scotland Wales Northern Ireland UK
Female Deaths 234 25 17 3 279
Crude Rate 0.8 0.9 1.1 0.3 0.8
AS Rate 0.8 0.9 1.0 0.3 0.8
AS Rate - 95% LCL 0.7 0.5 0.5 0.0 0.7
AS Rate - 95% UCL 0.9 1.2 1.5 0.7 0.9
Male Deaths 126 21 9 2 158
Crude Rate 0.5 0.8 0.6 0.2 0.5
AS Rate 0.5 0.9 0.6 0.3 0.6
AS Rate - 95% LCL 0.4 0.5 0.2 0.0 0.5
AS Rate - 95% UCL 0.6 1.3 1.0 0.6 0.6
Persons Deaths 360 46 26 5 437
Crude Rate 0.6 0.8 0.8 0.3 0.7
AS Rate 0.7 0.9 0.8 0.3 0.7
AS Rate - 95% LCL 0.6 0.6 0.5 0.0 0.6
AS Rate - 95% UCL 0.8 1.1 1.1 0.6 0.8

95% LCL and 95% UCL are the 95% lower and upper confidence limits Open a glossary item  around the AS Rate Open a glossary item
 
Anal cancer is one of the few non-sex-specific cancer types with a higher mortality ASR in women than men, this is probably due to sex differences in incidence.

References

  1. Data were provided by the Office for National Statistics on request, November 2018. Similar data can be found here: http://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/birthsdeathsandmarriages/deaths.
  2. Data were provided by ISD Scotland on request, October 2018. Similar data can be found here: http://www.isdscotland.org/Health-Topics/Cancer/Publications/index.asp.
  3. Data were provided by the Northern Ireland Cancer Registry on request, March 2019. Similar data can be found here: http://www.qub.ac.uk/research-centres/nicr/.

About this data

Data is for UK, 2017, ICD-10 C21.

Last reviewed:

Anal cancer mortality is strongly related to age, with the highest mortality rates being in older people. In the UK in 2015-2017, on average each year around 4 in 10 (41%) deaths were in people aged 75 and over.[1-3] This largely reflects higher incidence and lower survival for anal cancer in older people.

Age-specific mortality rates rise steadily from around age 40-44 and more steeply from around age 70-74. The highest rates are in the 90+ age group for females and males. Mortality rates are similar between females and males in all age groups. 

Anal Cancer (C21), Average Number of Deaths per Year and Age-Specific Mortality Rates per 100,000 Population, UK, 2015-2017

95% LCL and 95% UCL are the 95% lower and upper confidence limits Open a glossary item around the AS Rate Open a glossary item.

References

  1. Data were provided by the Office for National Statistics on request, November 2018. Similar data can be found here: http://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/birthsdeathsandmarriages/deaths.
  2. Data were provided by ISD Scotland on request, October 2018. Similar data can be found here: http://www.isdscotland.org/Health-Topics/Cancer/Publications/index.asp.
  3. Data were provided by the Northern Ireland Cancer Registry on request, March 2019. Similar data can be found here: http://www.qub.ac.uk/research-centres/nicr/.

About this data

Data is for UK, 2015-2017, ICD-10 C21.

Last reviewed:

Anal cancer European age-standardised (AS) mortality rates Open a glossary item for females and males combined increased by 65% in the UK between 1979-1981 and 2015-2017.[1-3] The increase was larger in females than in males.

For females, anal cancer AS mortality rates in the UK increased by 97% between 1979-1981 and 2015-2017. For males, anal cancer AS mortality rates in the UK increased by 32% between 1979-1981 and 2015-2017.

Over the last decade in the UK (between 2005-2007 and 2015-2017), anal cancer AS mortality rates Open a glossary item for females and males combined increased by 33%.[1-3] In females AS mortality rates increased by 36%, and in males rates increased by 29%.

Anal Cancer (C21), European Age-Standardised Mortality Rates per 100,000 Population, UK, 1979-2017

For most cancer types, mortality trends largely reflect incidence and survival trends. For example, rising mortality may reflect rising incidence and stable survival, while falling mortality may reflect rising incidence and rising survival.

Anal cancer mortality rates have increased overall in all broad adult age groups in females in the UK since the late 1970s.[1-3] Rates in 25-49s have increased by 505%, in 50-59s have increased by 158%, in 60-69s have increased by 160%, in 70-79s have increased by 53%, and in 80+s have increased by 52%.

Anal Cancer (C21), European Age-Standardised Mortality Rates per 100,000 Population, By Age, Females, UK, 1979-2017

Anal cancer mortality rates have remained stable overall in most broad adult age groups in males in the UK since the late 1970s, but have increased in some.[1-3] Rates in 25-49s have remained stable, in 50-59s have increased by 97%, in 60-69s have remained stable, in 70-79s have remained stable, and in 80+s have remained stable.

Anal Cancer (C21), European Age-Standardised Mortality Rates per 100,000 Population, By Age, Males, UK, 1979-2017

References

  1. Data were provided by the Office for National Statistics on request, November 2018. Similar data can be found here: http://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/birthsdeathsandmarriages/deaths.
  2. Data were provided by ISD Scotland on request, October 2018. Similar data can be found here: http://www.isdscotland.org/Health-Topics/Cancer/Publications/index.asp.
  3. Data were provided by the Northern Ireland Cancer Registry on request, March 2019. Similar data can be found here: http://www.qub.ac.uk/research-centres/nicr/.

About this data

Data is for UK, 1979-2017, C21.

ICD-10 coding for anal cancer changed in 1979 so data from before this point are not comparable with data from after this point. Anal cancer mortality trends over time are calculated only from 1979 onwards.

Last reviewed:

Projections which reflect past trends in cancer mortality suggest that anal cancer mortality will rise in future decades.[1] These projections do not model the possible impact of HPV vaccination on anal cancer incidence rates, and the subsequent impact on mortality rates. If anal cancer incidence rates fall markedly in future decades as projected, [2] anal cancer mortality rates may also fall more markedly than projections based on past trends would suggest.

References

  1. Smittenaar CR, Petersen KA, Stewart K, Moitt N. Cancer Incidence and Mortality Projections in the UK Until 2035. Brit J Cancer 2016.
  2. Johnson HC, Lafferty EI, Eggo RM, Louie K, Soldan K, Waller J, Edmunds WJ. Effect of HPV vaccination and cervical cancer screening in England by ethnicity: a modelling study. Lancet Public Health 2018;3(1):e44-e51.

About this data

Data is for: UK, 1979-2014 (observed), 2015-2035 (projected), ICD-10 C21

Projections are based on observed incidence and mortality rates and therefore implicitly include changes in cancer risk factors, diagnosis and treatment. It is not possible to assess the statistical significance of changes between 2014 (observed) and 2035 (projected) figures. Confidence intervals are not calculated for the projected figures. Projections are by their nature uncertain because unexpected events in future could change the trend. It is not sensible to calculate a boundary of uncertainty around these already uncertain point estimates. Changes are described as "increase" or "decrease" if there is any difference between the point estimates.

More on projections methodology

Last reviewed:

There is evidence for an association between anal cancer mortality and deprivation for both males and females in England (though the association is stronger for males).[1] England-wide data for 2007-2011 show European age-standardised Open a glossary item mortality rates are 134% higher for males living in the most deprived areas compared with the least deprived, and 85% higher for females.[1]

Anal Cancer (C21), European Age-Standardised Mortality Rates by Deprivation Quintile, England, 2007-2011

The estimated deprivation gradient in anal cancer mortality between people living in the most and least deprived areas in England has not changed in the period 2002-2011.[1] It has been estimated that there would have been around 70 fewer cancer deaths each year in England during 2007-2011 if all people experienced the same mortality rates as the least deprived.[1]

References

  1. Cancer Research UK and National Cancer Intelligence Network. Cancer by deprivation in England: Incidence, 1996-2010, Mortality, 1997-2011. London: NCIN; 2014.

About this data

Data is for: UK, 2007-2011, ICD-10 C21

Deprivation gradient statistics were calculated using mortality data for 2007-2011. The deprivation quintiles were calculated using the Income domain scores from the Index of Multiple Deprivation (IMD) from the following years: 2004, 2007 and 2010. Full details on the data and methodology can be found in the Cancer by Deprivation in England NCIN report.

Last reviewed:

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