Vaginal cancer statistics

Cases

New cases of vaginal cancer, 2011, UK

Deaths

Deaths from vaginal cancer, 2012, UK

Prevention

Preventable cases of vaginal cancer, UK

  • In 2011, around 260 women were diagnosed with vaginal cancer. That is around 5 every week.
  • Vaginal cancer is a rare cancer in the UK, accounting for around 1% of all gynaecological cancers.
  • Incidence of vaginal cancer increases with age, with the highest rates in women aged 85 years and over.

Read more in-depth vaginal cancer incidence statistics

  • 63% of vaginal cancer cases each year in the UK are linked to major lifestyle and other risk factors.
  • A woman’s risk of developing vaginal cancer depends on many factors, including age, genetics, and exposure to risk factors (including some potentially avoidable lifestyle factors).
  • Evidence on vaginal cancer risk factors is limited, mainly because this cancer is relatively rare.
  • Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the main potentially avoidable risk factor for vaginal cancer, linked to an estimated 63% of vaginal cancer cases in the UK. Some other factors may relate to vaginal cancer risk partly because they are related to HPV.
  • Exposure to diethylstilbestrol in utero causes vaginal cancer.
  • Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and problems with the immune system may relate to higher vaginal cancer risk, but evidence is unclear.

Read more in-depth vaginal cancer risk factors

The latest statistics available for vaginal cancer in the UK are; incidence 2011, mortality 2012. Reliable survival data for the UK is currently not available. 

The ICD code Open a glossary item for vaginal cancer is ICD-10 C52.

Overall, the evidence on vaginal cancer risk factors is limited, mainly because of this cancer’s relative rarity. Many studies combine vaginal and vulval cancer in order to obtain a larger number of cases for analysis.

Meta-analyses Open a glossary item and systematic reviews Open a glossary item are cited where available, as they provide the best overview of all available research and most take study quality into account. Individual case-control and cohort studies Open a glossary item are reported where such aggregated data are lacking.

See information and explanations on terminology used for statistics and reporting of cancer, and the methods used to calculate some of the statistics are also available.

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