Kidney cancer survival statistics

Survival

Survive kidney cancer for 10 or more years, 2010-11, England and Wales

Age

Age that kidney cancer survival is highest, 2009-2013, England

 

Improvement

Kidney cancer survival in the UK has increased in the last 40 years

 

73% of men survive kidney cancer for at least one year, and this is predicted to fall to 57% surviving for five years or more, as shown by age-standardised Open a glossary item net survival for patients diagnosed with kidney cancer during 2010-2011 in England and Wales.[1] Survival for women is slightly lower, with 71% surviving for one year or more, and 56% predicted to survive for at least five years.

Kidney Cancer (C64-C66 and C68), Age-Standardised One-, Five- and Ten-Year Net Survival, Adults (Aged 15-99), England and Wales, 2010-2011

1-Year Survival (%) 5-Year Survival (%) 10-Year Survival (%)
Men Net Survival 73.1 56.5 49.8
95% LCL 73.1 56.3 49.3
95% UCL 73.2 56.8 50.4
Women Net Survival 71.1 55.7 49.0
95% LCL 71.1 55.4 48.3
95% UCL 71.2 56.0 49.7
Adults Net Survival 72.4 56.2 49.5
95% LCL 72.3 56.0 49.1
95% UCL 72.4 56.4 50.0

95% LCL and 95% UCL are the 95% lower and upper confidence limits Open a glossary item

Five- and ten-year survival is predicted using an excess hazard statistical model

Kidney cancer survival continues to fall beyond five years after diagnosis. 50% of men and 49% of women are predicted to survive their disease for ten years or more, as shown by age-standardised net survival for patients diagnosed with kidney cancer during 2010-2011 in England and Wales.[1] Out of 20 common cancers in England and Wales, ten-year survival for kidney cancer ranks 12th highest overall.

Kidney Cancer (C64-C66 and C68), Net Survival up to Ten Years after Diagnosis, Adults (Aged 15-99), England and Wales, 2010-2011

Survival for kidney cancer is reported in Scotland and Northern Ireland,[2,3] though it is difficult to make survival comparisons between countries due to different methodologies and criteria for including patients in analyses.

References

  1. Data were provided by London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine on request, 2014.
  2. ISD Scotland. Trends in Cancer Survival 1983-2007.
  3. Northern Ireland Cancer Registry. Incidence & Survival 1993-2012.

About this data

Data is for: England and Wales, 2010-2011, ICD-10 C64-C66 and C68

Last reviewed:

Five-year survival for kidney cancer is highest in the youngest men and women and decreases with increasing age. Five-year net survival in men ranges from 74% in 15-49 year-olds to 38% in 80-99 year-olds for patients diagnosed with kidney cancer in England during 2009-2013.[1] In women, five-year survival ranges from 81% to 33% in the same age groups.

Kidney Cancer (C64-C66 and C68), Five-Year Net Survival by Age, England, 2009-2013

References

  1. Office for National Statistics. Cancer survival in England: adults diagnosed in 2009 to 2013,followed up to 2014. Newport: ONS; 2015.

About this data

Data is for: England, 2009-2013, ICD-10 C64-C66 and C68

Last reviewed:

As with most cancers, survival for kidney cancer is improving. One-year age-standardised net survival for kidney cancer in men has increased from 45% during 1971-1972 to 73% during 2010-2011 in England and Wales – an absolute survival difference Open a glossary item of 28 percentage points.[1] In women, one-year survival has increased from 44% to 71% over the same time period (a difference of 27 percentage points).

Kidney Cancer (C64-C66 and C68), Age-Standardised One-Year Net Survival, Adults (Aged 15-99), England and Wales, 1971-2011

Five-year age-standardised net survival for kidney cancer in men has increased from 29% during 1971-1972 to a predicted survival of 57% during 2010-2011 in England and Wales – an absolute survival difference of 28 percentage points.[1] In women, five-year survival has increased from 28% to 56% over the same time period (a difference of 28 percentage points).

Kidney Cancer (C64-C66 and C68), Age-Standardised Five-Year Net Survival, Adults (Aged 15-99), England and Wales, 1971-2011

Five-year survival for 2010-2011 is predicted using an excess hazard statistical model

Ten-year survival has followed the same trend as one- and five-year survival since the early 1970s. Ten-year age-standardised net survival for kidney cancer in men has increased from 23% during 1971-1972 to a predicted survival of 50% during 2010-2011 in England and Wales - an absolute survival difference of 27 percentage points.[1] In women, ten-year survival has increased from 23% to 49% over the same time period (a difference of 26 percentage points). Overall, half of people diagnosed with kidney cancer today are predicted to survive their disease for at least ten years.

Kidney Cancer (C64-C66 and C68), Age-Standardised Ten-Year Net Survival, Adults (Aged 15-99), England and Wales, 1971-2011

Ten-year survival for 2005-2006 and 2010-2011 is predicted using an excess hazard statistical model

References

  1. Data were provided by London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine on request, 2014.

About this data

Data is for: England and Wale, 1971-2011, ICD-10 C64-C66 and C68

Last reviewed:

Survival for kidney cancer is related to stage of the disease at diagnosis.

One-year net survival for kidney cancer is highest for patients diagnosed at stage I, and lowest for those diagnosed at stage IV, 2014 data for England show.[1] 95% of patients diagnosed at stage I survived their disease for at least one year, versus 37% patients diagnosed at stage IV.

One-year net survival for unknown stage kidney cancer is 71%. Lack of staging information may in some cases reflect advanced stage at diagnosis: for example very unwell patients may not undergo staging tests if the invasiveness of the testing outweighs the potential benefit of obtaining stage information.[1]

Kidney Cancer (C64), One-Year Age Standardised Net Survival by Stage, Adults (Ages 15-99 Years), England 2014

One-year net survival is similar between males and females at all stages.

Five-year survival for kidney cancer shows a much more rapid decrease in survival between Stages I and IV. In men, five-year relative survival ranges from 84% at Stage I to 5% at Stage IV for patients diagnosed during 2002-2006 in the former Anglia Cancer Network.[2] In women, five-year survival ranges from 82% at Stage I to 7% at Stage IV. There are no significant differences in five-year survival between men and women at any of the stages.

Kidney Cancer excluding Renal Pelvis (C64), Five-Year Relative Survival by Stage, Adults (Aged 15-99 Years), Former Anglia Cancer Network, 2002-2006

References

  1. Office for National Statistics, Cancer survival by stage at diagnosis for England, 2016
  2. Data provided by The National Cancer Registration Service, Eastern Office on request. Similar data can be found here: http://www.ncras.nhs.uk/ncrs-east/

About this data

Data is for: England, 2014 (one-year), Former Anglia Cancer Network, 2002-2006 (five-year), ICD-10 C64

Survival statistics give an overall picture of survival and the survival time experienced by an individual patient may be much higher or lower, depending on specific patient and tumour characteristics.

Last reviewed:

Five-year relative survival for kidney cancer in men in England (47%) is below the average for Europe (60%). Wales (49%), Scotland (46%) and Northern Ireland (48%) are also below the European average.[1] Across the European countries for which data is available, five-year relative survival in men ranges from 39% (Bulgaria) to 72% (Austria).[1

Five-year relative survival for kidney cancer in women in England (48%) is below the average for Europe (62%). Wales (52%), Scotland (46%) and Northern Ireland (50%) are also below the European average.[1] Across the European countries for which data is available, five-year relative survival in women ranges from 44% (Denmark) to 72% (Austria).[1

Kidney Cancer (C64-C66, C68), Age-Standardised Five-Year Relative Survival, Adults (Aged 15+), European Countries, 2000-2007

Data consists of both observed and predicted 5-year relative survival. Where sufficient follow-up was not available for recently diagnosed patients the period approach was used to predict 5-year cohort survival.

Possible explanations for persistent international differences in survival include differences in cancer biology, use of diagnostic tests and screening, stage at diagnosis, access to high-quality care, and data collection practices.[1]

References

  1. De Angelis R, Sant M, Coleman MP, et al. Cancer survival in Europe 1999-2007 by country and age: results of EUROCARE-5 - a population-based study. Lancet Oncol 2014;15:23-34

About this data

Data is for: 29 European countries, patients diagnosed in 2000-2007 and followed up to 2008, kidney cancer (International Classification of Diseases for Oncology [ICD-O-3] C64-C66, C68).

Last reviewed:

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