A trial of exercise as treatment for men with prostate cancer (PANTERA)

Cancer type:

Prostate cancer

Status:

Open

Phase:

Other

This trial is looking at exercise as a treatment for men with prostate cancer. The trial is for men with prostate cancer that is completely contained in the prostate gland (localised prostate cancer). This trial is supported by Cancer Research UK.

We know from research that exercise can improve your fitness, strength, overall health and quality of life. It may also slow down the growth of cancer.

More about this trial

This is a feasibility study. The researchers want to find out if it is possible to do a trial comparing men who have prostate cancer and follow an exercise programme with men who don’t. They want to find out

  • How willing men are to take part in a trial looking at exercise
  • If the men will attend all the necessary exercise sessions and assessments
  • If there may be any undesirable effects of the exercise programme

Who can enter

You may be able to join this trial if all of the following apply. You

  • Have prostate cancer and you have had a PSA blood test and a scan Open a glossary item or sample of tissue taken (biopsy Open a glossary item) to assess your cancer in the past year
  • Have a Gleason score Open a glossary item of 7 or less (the trial team will advise you about this)
  • Have cancer that is completely contained within the prostate gland
  • Have a PSA blood test result of 20 ng/ml or less
  • Are willing to have your cancer closely monitored (active surveillance)

You cannot join this trial if any of these apply. You

  • Have already had surgery, radiotherapy or hormone treatment for your prostate cancer
  • Have prostate cancer that is in more than one half of the prostate gland (your doctor can tell you this)
  • Have certain heart problems (the trial team can advise you about this)
  • Have a pacemaker
  • Already do a certain amount of regular exercise (the trial team can advise you about this)
  • Are taking part in another clinical trial that may affect the results of this study
  • Have another medical or mental health problem that could affect you taking part in this trial

Trial design

This is a feasibility study. The researchers need 50 men to join.

It is a randomised trial. The people taking part are put into treatment groups by a computer. Neither you nor your doctor will be able to decide which group you are in.

  • Men in one group have an individual exercise plan created for them
  • Men in the other group will be given a physical activity pack

All the men taking part will have their cancer closely monitored (active surveillance) by their doctor.

Men who have an exercise plan created for them will go to a training session twice a week for a year. This can be during a week day or evening. You will also need to follow an exercise plan at home in your own time. Every 2 months they will also give you advice and support about how to change your behaviour. This may be done at your exercise sessions or over the phone.

The physical activity pack given to the other men will tell them generally about exercise for people living with and beyond cancer.

The researchers will collect a sample of your spit (saliva), by asking you to spit into a small test tube. They will use this to look at the DNA Open a glossary item.

The trial team will ask you to fill out a questionnaire before you start treatment, at 3 months, 6 months and at the end of the study. The questionnaire will ask about your exercise and diet habits as well as how you are generally.

At the end of the trial, the researchers want to interview about 10 to 15 men. They want to find out why they took part and their overall experience of taking part in the trial. You don’t have to agree to this if you don’t want to. You can still take part in the main trial.

Hospital visits

You see the doctor to have some tests before taking part. These tests include

  • A physical examination
  • Blood tests
  • Test of your fitness using a treadmill or exercise bike

You see the doctor again at 3 months, 6 months and a year for the same tests.

If you are going to the interview at the end of the trial, it will take place at Sheffield Hallam University.

Side effects

The trial team don’t expect there to be any side effects from taking part.

Location

Sheffield

Recruitment start:

Recruitment end:

How to join a clinical trial

Please note: In order to join a trial you will need to discuss it with your doctor, unless otherwise specified.

Please note - unless we state otherwise in the summary, you need to talk to your doctor about joining a trial.

Chief Investigator

Dr Liam Bourke

Supported by

Cancer Research UK
Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

Other information

This is Cancer Research UK trial number CRUK/13/071.

Contact our cancer information nurses for other questions about cancer by:

Phone - 0808 800 4040

Last review date

CRUK internal database number:

11739

Please note - unless we state otherwise in the summary, you need to talk to your doctor about joining a trial.

Keith took part in a trial looking into hormone therapy

A picture of Keith

"Health wise I am feeling great. I am a big supporter of trials - it allows new treatments and drugs to be brought in.”

Last reviewed:

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