Tissue typing blood tests

You have tissue typing tests if your doctor thinks that a donor bone marrow transplant might be a possible treatment for you. Tissue typing is a set of blood tests that show how closely a possible bone marrow donor’s tissue matches your own.

Your white blood cells have proteins called HLA markers on their surface. HLA stands for human leucocyte antigen. If the bone marrow donor's HLA markers are very similar to yours, there is less chance that your immune system will reject their blood cells.

You might have your tissue typing blood tests at the same time as other blood tests.

Your medical team will talk to you about the possibility of testing members of your family. This is to see if they are the same tissue type as you.

Preparing for your tissue typing test

You can eat and drink normally before your tissue typing test. Take your medicines as normal.

What happens?

You sit or lie down to have the test.

A doctor, nurse or phlebotomist (person specialised in taking blood) chooses the best vein to use. This is usually from your arm or hand. Let them know if you are afraid of needles, get unwell with the sight of blood or are allergic to plasters or latex. 

They put a tight band (tourniquet) around your arm above the area where they take the sample. You may need to clench your fist to make it easier to find a vein.

They clean your skin and then put a small needle into your vein. Next, they attach a small bottle or syringe to the needle to draw out some blood. They might fill several small bottles.

Once they have all the samples, they release the band around your arm. They then take the needle out and put pressure on the area with a cotton wool ball or small piece of gauze for a few minutes. This helps to stop bleeding and bruising.

Look away when they’re taking the blood if you prefer. Tell your doctor, nurse or phlebotomist if you feel unwell.

Getting your results

Your scan will be looked at by a specialist doctor and you should get your results within 1 or 2 weeks. You won't get any results at the time of the scan. 

Waiting for test results can make you anxious. Ask your doctor or nurse how long it will take to get them. Contact them if you haven’t heard anything after a couple of weeks.

You might have the contact details for a specialist nurse. You can contact them for information and support if you need to. It may help to talk to a close friend or relative about how you feel. 

For support and information, you can call the Cancer Research UK nurses on freephone 0808 800 4040. The lines are open from 9am to 5pm, Monday to Friday.

Contact the doctor that arranged the test if you haven't heard anything after a couple of weeks.

Possible risks

Blood sampling (phlebotomy) is a safe test. There is a possibility of:

  • bleeding and bruising - pressing hard when the needle is removed can help to stop it
  • pain - this is normally mild and can last for a few minutes
  • swelling (oedema) - ask your nurse, doctor or phlebotomist to avoid an arm that is swollen or has a risk of swelling
  • feeling faint or fainting - tell the person doing your blood test if you're feeling lightheaded or dizzy at any time
  • infection - this is very rare

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