A trial of low intensity stem cell transplant after chemotherapy for acute myeloid leukaemia and high risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MUNICH)

Cancer type:

Acute leukaemia
Acute myeloid leukaemia (AML)
Blood cancers
Leukaemia
Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS)

Status:

Results

Phase:

Phase 2

This trial looked at having a reduced intensity stem cell transplant straight after chemotherapy for acute myeloid leukaemia and myelodysplastic syndrome. 

This trial was for people with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) or high risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) that hadn’t responded to treatment or came back after treatment.

More about this trial

Chemotherapy and a stem cell transplant are the usual treatments for AML and high risk MDS. 

You have chemotherapy first to try and get rid of all the cancerous or abnormal cells. After you recover from chemotherapy you have a test to see how well it worked. 

You might have a stem cell transplant if your test shows no sign (or nearly no sign) of cancer or abnormal cells. The transplant can be several weeks after chemotherapy. This means you are in hospital for chemotherapy and then again for the transplant.

Researchers have looked at giving the transplant 3 days after chemotherapy. They use lower doses of treatment than people usually have before a stem cell transplant. This is called a reduced intensity transplant. This would mean being in hospital only once. 

The aims of this trial were to find:

  • how well having a stem cell transplant straight after chemotherapy worked for people with AML and high risk MDS that hadn’t responded to treatment or came back after treatment 
  • how long they needed to stay in hospital 
  • what the side effects were

Summary of results

The team found that a reduced intensity stem cell transplant straight after chemotherapy could help people with AML and high risk MDS that hadn’t responded to treatment or came back afterwards. 

54 people took part in this phase 2 trial

The average number of days they stayed in hospital was 36. 

The team looked at the total number of people who were still alive at 1 year and 2 years after treatment. This is called overall survival. 

They found this was:

  • 23 people at year 1
  • 16 people at year 2

The team also looked at the number of people whose disease hadn’t come back or who hadn’t died. This is event free survival. 

They found this was:

  • 20 people at year 1
  • 12 people at year 2

The worst side effects were graft versus host disease (GVHD) and infection.

The trial team concluded a reduced intensity transplant could help people with AML or high risk MDS that didn’t respond to treatment or came back afterwards. 

We have based this summary on information from the research team.  As far as we are aware, the information they sent us has not been reviewed independently (peer reviewed Open a glossary item) or published in a medical journal yet. The figures we quote above were provided by the research team. We have not analysed the data ourselves.

Recruitment start:

Recruitment end:

How to join a clinical trial

Please note: In order to join a trial you will need to discuss it with your doctor, unless otherwise specified.

Please note - unless we state otherwise in the summary, you need to talk to your doctor about joining a trial.

Chief Investigator

Dr James Cavenagh

Supported by

Barts Health NHS Trust
Experimental Cancer Medicine Centre (ECMC)
Queen Mary University of London

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Last review date

CRUK internal database number:

2591

Please note - unless we state otherwise in the summary, you need to talk to your doctor about joining a trial.

Wendy took part in a new trial studying the possible side effect of hearing loss

A picture of Wendy

"I was delighted to take part in a clinical trial as it has the potential to really help others in the future.”

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