A study looking at whether dogs can help diagnose prostate, bladder or kidney cancer

Cancer type:

Bladder cancer
Kidney cancer
Prostate cancer

Status:

Open

Phase:

Other

This study is looking at whether dogs can help diagnose urological cancers by being able to smell them in a urine sample. Urological cancers include prostate, bladder and kidney cancer. 

More about this trial

Dogs have a very good sense of smell. Cancer cells release substances (volatiles) that have a distinctive smell.  Previous research has shown that dogs might be able to find bladder cancer in urine samples. 

In this study researchers want to see if dogs can be trained to smell prostate, bladder or kidney cancer. They will use urine samples from 2 groups of people

  • healthy volunteers 
  • people who have or might have a urological cancer

You will not have any direct benefit from taking part in this study. But researchers hope their research will lead to urological cancers being diagnosed earlier. This might lead to more successful treatment.

Who can enter

The following bullet points list the entry conditions for this study. Talk to your doctor or the study team if you are unsure about any of these. They will be able to advise you. 

You may be able to join this study if you are attending a urology clinic at Milton Keynes University Hospital. And you are aged 18 or older.

You will not be able to take part if 

  • you are currently having treatment for any type of cancer
  • you are having dialysis
  • you have HIV or hepatitis 

Healthy volunteers
You will be able to take part if you are aged between 18 and 40. 

You will not be able to take part if 

  • you have been a patient at a urology clinic in the last year
  • you have or have had any type of cancer
  • you are having dialysis
  • you have HIV or hepatitis

Trial design

The researchers would like urine samples from 3000 people.

Healthy volunteers
You might hear about this study 

  • from a public event
  • because you are a member of staff or a visitor to Milton Keynes University Hospital

If you want to take part you are put in touch with a research nurse. 

You are asked to complete a short health questionnaire and provide a urine sample.

Your questionnaire and sample are labelled in a way that means that you are anonymous. 

Your urine sample is used to help train a team of sniffer dogs. They are trained to tell the difference between the smell of a sample of urine from someone with a urological cancer and a sample from someone with no cancer. 

The samples are also sent to a laboratory at the University of Bedford. This is so they can find out what substances (volatiles) the dogs are able to smell. 

Urology clinic volunteers
Your doctor or nurse will tell you about this study if you are attending a urology clinic at Milton Keynes University Hospital

You are asked to complete a short health questionnaire and provide a urine sample.

Your questionnaire and sample are labelled in a way that means that you are anonymous. 

Your urine sample is used to help train a team of sniffer dogs. They are trained to tell the difference between the smell of a sample of urine from someone with a urological cancer and a sample from someone with no cancer. 

The samples are also sent to a laboratory at the University of Bedford. This is so they can find out what substances (volatiles) the dogs are able to smell. 

Results from your clinical tests, including any diagnosis are sent to the researchers. About every 6 months the study team will review your medical notes. They will send any relevant information about your health and condition to the researchers. 

If you have to go back to the urology clinic for any follow up appointments you are asked to complete another questionnaire. And provide another urine sample.

Hospital visits

Healthy volunteers
You can complete your questionnaire and provide your urine sample at

  • Milton Keynes University Hospital
  • the Medical Detection Dogs Centre in Great Horwood (near Milton Keynes)
  • certain public events (these may be held at the hospital or other places such as the University of Buckingham)

Alternatively, the study team can post you the questionnaire and a member of the team can collect the paperwork and the urine sample. You need to freeze the urine sample as soon as you have done it and it needs to remain frozen until it is collected.

Urology clinic volunteers
There are no extra visits if you take part in this study. The questionnaire and urine sample are completed during a routine visit. 

Side effects

There are no side effects associated with this study. 

Location

Milton Keynes

Recruitment start:

Recruitment end:

How to join a clinical trial

Please note: In order to join a trial you will need to discuss it with your doctor, unless otherwise specified.

Please note - unless we state otherwise in the summary, you need to talk to your doctor about joining a trial.

Chief Investigator

Mr Iqbal Anjum

Supported by

Medical Detection Dogs
Milton Keynes University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

 

Questions about cancer? Contact our information nurses

Freephone 0808 800 4040

Last review date

CRUK internal database number:

13714

Please note - unless we state otherwise in the summary, you need to talk to your doctor about joining a trial.

Charlie took part in a trial to try new treatments

A picture of Charlie

“I think it’s really important that people keep signing up to these type of trials to push research forward.”

Last reviewed:

Rate this page:

No votes yet
Thank you!
We've recently made some changes to the site, tell us what you think