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Survival

Survival depends on many different factors. It depends on your individual condition, type of neuroendocrine tumour (NET), treatment and level of fitness. So no one can tell you exactly how long you will live. 

These are general statistics based on large groups of people. Remember, they can’t tell you what will happen in your individual case.

Your doctor can give you more information about your own outlook (prognosis).

You can also talk about this with the Cancer Research UK nurses on freephone 0808 800 4040, from 9am to 5pm, Monday to Friday.

Number stages

The stage of a cancer tells you how big it is and whether it has spread. There are 4 stages of small bowel neuroendocrine tumours:

  • stage 1
  • stage 2
  • stage 3
  • stage 4

The grade of the tumour tells you how abnormal the cells look under the microscope.

Doctors talk about survival by stage and grade of small bowel NET. 

Where this information comes from

Because small bowel neuroendocrine tumours are rare, there is less data available than for more common cancers.

The data presented here is for the 1 year survival of people with small bowel neuroendocrine tumours in England. Because this is from England only, it might not be the same for the whole of the UK.

We also have some information about the overall 5 year survival for people with small bowel neuroendocrine tumours. This is from a much smaller study. It is European data, so it might not be the same as the 5 year survival in the UK.

About these statistics

The terms 1 year survival and 5 year survival don't mean that you will only live for 1 or 5 years. Some people live much longer than 5 years.

Survival for all stages of small bowel NET

Around 90 out of 100 people (around 90%) survive for 1 year or more.

Around 89 out of every 100 people (around 89%) people survive for 5 years or more.

Survival for stage 1

Around 98 out of 100 people (around 98%) survive for 1 year or more.

Survival for stage 2

Around 96 out of 100 people (around 96%) survive for 1 year or more.

Survival for stage 3

Around 96 out of 100 people (around 96%) who have a stage 3 tumour, which is grade 1 or grade 2, survive for 1 year or more. 

Around 80 out of 100 people (around 80%) who have a stage 3 tumour, which is grade 3, survive for 1 year or more.

Survival for stage 4

Around 88 out of 100 people (around 88%) who have a stage 4 tumour, which is grade 1 or grade 2, survive for 1 year or more.

Around 71 out of every 100 people (around 71%) who have a stage 4 tumour, which is grade 3, survive for 1 year or more.

Last reviewed: 
02 Oct 2018
  • 1-year survival rates for neuroendocrine tumour patients in England
    T Genus and others
    Public Health England, 2017

  • Neuroendocrine tumours of midgut and hindgut origin: tumour-node-metastasis classification determines clinical outcome
    H Jann and others
    Cancer, 2011
    Volume 117