Small intestine cancer incidence statistics

Cases

New cases of small intestine cancer, 2014, UK

 

Proportion of all cases

Percentage small intestine cancer is of total cancer cases, 2014, UK

 

Age

Peak rate of small intestine cases, 2012-2014, UK

 

In 2014 there were 1,484 new cases of small intestine cancer in the UK: 831 (56%) in males and 653 (44%) in females giving a male: female ratio of around 13.10.[1-4] The crude incidence rate Open a glossary item shows that there are 3 new small intestine cancer cases for every 100,000 males in the UK, and 2 for every 100,000 females.

The European age-standardised rates (AS rates Open a glossary item) do not differ significantly between the countries of the UK for either sex.

Small Intestine Cancer (C17), Number of New Cases, Crude and European Age-Standardised (AS) Incidence Rates per 100,000 Population, UK, 2014

England Wales Scotland Northern Ireland UK
Male Cases 683 40 81 27 831
Crude Rate 2.6 2.6 3.1 3.0 2.6
AS Rate 3.0 2.8 3.5 3.9 3.1
AS Rate - 95% LCL 2.8 1.9 2.7 2.4 2.9
AS Rate - 95% UCL 3.2 3.6 4.3 5.4 3.3
Female Cases 555 30 56 12 653
Crude Rate 2.0 1.9 2.0 1.3 2.0
AS Rate 2.1 1.7 2.0 1.4 2.1
AS Rate - 95% LCL 1.9 1.1 1.5 0.6 1.9
AS Rate - 95% UCL 2.3 2.4 2.5 2.3 2.2
Persons Cases 1,238 70 137 39 1,484
Crude Rate 2.3 2.3 2.6 2.1 2.3
AS Rate 2.5 2.2 2.7 2.5 2.5
AS Rate - 95% LCL 2.4 1.7 2.2 1.7 2.4
AS Rate - 95% UCL 2.7 2.7 3.1 3.3 2.6

95% LCL and 95% UCL are the 95% lower and upper confidence limits Open a glossary item around the AS rate
 

For small intestine cancer, like most cancer types, minor variation between countries largely reflect risk factor prevalence in years past.

References

  1. Data were provided by the Office for National Statistics on request, June 2016. Similar data can be found here: http://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/healthandsocialcare/conditionsanddiseases/bulletins/cancerregistrationstatisticsengland/previousReleases.
  2. Data were provided by ISD Scotland on request, May 2016. Similar data can be found here: http://www.isdscotland.org/Health-Topics/Cancer/Publications/.
  3. Data were provided by the Welsh Cancer Intelligence and Surveillance Unit, Health Intelligence Division, Public Health Wales on request, June 2016. Similar data can be found here: http://www.wcisu.wales.nhs.uk.
  4. Data were provided by the Northern Ireland Cancer Registry on request, May 2016. Similar data can be found here: http://www.qub.ac.uk/research-centres/nicr/.

About this data

Data is for: UK, 2014, ICD10 C17

Last reviewed:

Small intestine cancer incidence is strongly related to age, with the highest incidence rates being in older males and females. In the UK in 2012-2014, on average each year half (50%) of cases were diagnosed in people aged 70 and over.[1-4]

For males, age-specific incidence rates rise sharply from around age 45-49, peak at age 85-89, and then drop in those aged 90+. For females, age-specific incidence rates rise gradually from around age 45-49, plateau in the 80-84 and 85-89 age groups and then drop. Incidence rates are higher for males than for females in those aged between 55-59 an 75-79 and for those aged 85-89 (in the younger age groups the sex difference is not significant) and this gap is widest at the ages of 65 to 69, when the male: female incidence ratio of age-specific rates (to account for the different proportions of males to females in each age group) is around 17:10.[1-4]

Small Intestine Cancer (C17), Average Number of New Cases per Year and Age-Specific Incidence Rates, UK, 2012-2014

For small intestine cancer, like most cancer types, incidence increases with age. This largely reflects cell DNA damage accumulating over time. Damage can result from biological processes or from exposure to risk factors. A drop or plateau in incidence in the oldest age groups often indicates reduced diagnostic activity perhaps due to general ill health.

References

  1. Data were provided by the Office for National Statistics on request, June 2016. Similar data can be found here: http://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/healthandsocialcare/conditionsanddiseases/bulletins/cancerregistrationstatisticsengland/previousReleases
  2. Data were provided by ISD Scotland on request, May 2016. Similar data can be found here: http://www.isdscotland.org/Health-Topics/Cancer/Publications/
  3. Data were provided by the Welsh Cancer Intelligence and Surveillance Unit, Health Intelligence Division, Public Health Wales on request, June 2016. Similar data can be found here: http://www.wcisu.wales.nhs.uk
  4. Data were provided by the Northern Ireland Cancer Registry on request, May 2016. Similar data can be found here: http://www.qub.ac.uk/research-centres/nicr/

About this data

Data is for UK, 2012-2014, ICD-10 C17

Last reviewed:

Cancer Statistics Explained

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