Cancer mortality by age

Age

Peak rate of cancer deaths, 2012-2014, UK

 

Trend over time by age

Greatest increase in cancer mortality rates since the early 1970s has been in people aged 0 to 24, UK 
 

 

Cancer is primarily a disease of older people, with mortality rates increasing with age for most cancers.[1-3] In the UK in 2012-2014, on average each year more than half (53%) of deaths were in people aged 75 and over.

All Cancers (C00-C97) Average Number of Deaths per Year and Age-Specific Mortality Rates, UK, 2012-2014

References

  1. Data were provided by the Office for National Statistics on request, November 2015. Similar data can be found here: https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/birthsdeathsandmarriages/deaths/bulletins/deathsregistrationsummarytables/previousReleases.
  2. Data were provided by the Information Services Division (ISD) Scotland on request, November 2015. Similar data can be found here: http://www.nrscotland.gov.uk/statistics-and-data/statistics/statistics-by-theme/vital-events/vital-events-reference-tables.
  3. Data were provided by the Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency on request, November 2015.Similar data can be found here: http://www.nisra.gov.uk/demography/default.asp2.htm.
Last reviewed:

Over half (53% in 2012-2014) of all cancer deaths in the UK each year occur in the elderly aged 75+.[1-3] A further 43% occur in adults aged 50-74. Children, and teenagers and young adults (aged 0-24), each account for less than 1% of all cancer deaths in the UK each year.

In children in Great Britain, brain, other central nervous system (CNS) and intracranial tumours are the most common cause of cancer death, accounting for around a third (31% and 33% in boys and girls respectively) of all cancer deaths in 1996-2005).[4]

In teenagers and young adults in the UK, brain, other central nervous system and intracranial tumours are the most common cause of cancer death, accounting for a quarter (25%) of all cancer deaths in males and around a fifth (19%) of all cancer deaths in females in 2012-2014.[1-3]

In males aged 25-49 in the UK, lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer death, accounting for more than a tenth (14%) of all deaths in 2012-2014.[1-3] In females aged 25-49 in the UK, breast cancer is the most common cause of cancer death, accounting for almost a third (31%) of all deaths in 2012-2014.[1-3]

In adults aged 50-74 in the UK, lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer death, accounting for around a quarter (26% and 25% in males and females respectively) of all cancer deaths in 2012-2014.[1-3]

In elderly people aged 75+ in the UK, lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer, death, accounting for around a fifth (21% and 19% in males and females respectively) of all cancer deaths in 2012-2014.[1-3]

References

  1. Data were provided by the Office for National Statistics on request, November 2015. Similar data can be found here: https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/birthsdeathsandmarriages/deaths/bulletins/deathsregistrationsummarytables/previousReleases.
  2. Data were provided by the Information Services Division (ISD) Scotland on request, November 2015. Similar data can be found here: http://www.nrscotland.gov.uk/statistics-and-data/statistics/statistics-by-theme/vital-events/vital-events-reference-tables.
  3. Data were provided by the Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency on request, November 2015.Similar data can be found here: http://www.nisra.gov.uk/demography/default.asp2.htm.
  4. Office for National Statistics. Mortality Statistics: Deaths registered in England and Wales (Series DR).
Last reviewed:

Mortality rates for all cancers combined have decreased for most of the broad age groups in the UK since the early 1970s, but have increased in people aged 75+.[1-3]

The largest decrease has been in people aged 0-24, with European age-standardised (AS) mortality rates decreasing by 62% between 1971-1973 and 2012-2014. The smallest decrease has been in people aged 50-74, with rates decreasing by 31% between 1971-1973 and 2012-2014.

All Cancers (C00-C97), European Age-Standardised Mortality Rates, Persons UK, 1971-2014

All cancers for people aged 0-24 includes all malignant tumours (ICD-10 codes: C00-C97) and all benign/uncertain or unknown behaviour brain, other central nervous system and intracranial tumours (ICD-10 codes: D32-D33, D35.2-D35.4, D42-D43 and D44.3-D44.5). All cancers for all other age groups do not include benign/uncertain or unknown behaviour brain, other central nervous system and intracranial tumours.

References

  1. Data were provided by the Office for National Statistics on request, November 2015. Similar data can be found here: https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/birthsdeathsandmarriages/deaths/bulletins/deathsregistrationsummarytables/previousReleases.
  2. Data were provided by the Information Services Division (ISD) Scotland on request, November 2015. Similar data can be found here: http://www.nrscotland.gov.uk/statistics-and-data/statistics/statistics-by-theme/vital-events/vital-events-reference-tables.
  3. Data were provided by the Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency on request, November 2015.Similar data can be found here: http://www.nisra.gov.uk/demography/default.asp2.htm.
Last reviewed:

Local Cancer Statistics

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Cancer stats explained

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