Cancer Research UK on Google+ Cancer Research UK on Facebook Cancer Research UK on Twitter
 

Teenage and young adult cancer Key Stats

TYA-stats-doughnutKey messages on incidence, survival, mortality, risk factors (causes) and a summary table of the statistics for teenage and young adult cancer are given here.

More comprehensive information and statistics for teenage and young adult cancer is here: incidence, mortality, survival, risk factors and diagnosis and treatment.

The latest statistics available for teenage and young adult cancer are; incidence 2009-2011, mortality 2009-2011, and survival 2001-2005. Source years are specified in the statistics table. Find out why these are the latest statistics available.

 

About teenage and young adult cancer

  • 'Teenage and young adult' (TYA) refers to 15-24 year-olds, inclusively.
  • TYA cancer includes all malignant tumours (excluding non-melanoma skin cancer), and all benign, uncertain and unknown behaviour brain, other central nervous system [CNS] and intracranial tumours. 
  • TYA cancer bridges the gap between paediatric and adult oncology, with a wide spectrum of cancers being diagnosed in this age group.
  • TYA cancers can be grouped into ten types:

section reviewed 01/05/13
section updated 01/05/13

 

How common is teenage and young adult cancer?

Read more in-depth teenage and young adult cancer incidence statistics.

section reviewed 21/05/14
section updated 01/05/13

 

How many teenagers and young adults die from cancer?

Read more in-depth teenage and young adult cancer mortality statistics.

section reviewed 02/01/14
section updated 02/01/14

 

How many teenagers and young adults survive cancer?

Read more in-depth teenage and young adult cancer survival statistics.

section reviewed 01/05/13
section updated 01/05/13

 

What causes cancer in teenagers and young adults?

  • A teenager or young adult’s risk of developing cancer depends on factors including age, genetics and other risk factors (including some potentially avoidable lifestyle factors).
  • Lifestyle risk factors probably have less impact on teenage and young adult cancer risk than adult cancer risk, because this age group has had less time exposed to these factors. Overall, evidence on teenage and young adult cancer risk factors is limited, mainly because of the relative rarity and diversity of this group of cancers.
  • Teenage and young adult lymphoma risk may relate to certain infections, but evidence is unclear.
  • Teenage and young adult carcinoma risk may relate to certain infections (e.g. cervix carcinoma) and genetic conditions (e.g. bowel and thyroid carcinoma), but evidence is unclear.
  • Teenage and young adult germ cell tumour risk may relate to certain congenital disorders (e.g. testicular germ cell tumours), but evidence is unclear.

Read more in-depth teenage and young adult cancer risk factors.

section reviewed 27/01/15
section updated 27/01/15

 

Teenage and young adult cancer statistics table

TEENAGE AND YOUNG ADULT CANCER STATISTICS Males
15-24
Females
15-24
Persons
15-24
Country Year3
Number of new cases per year1 1,153 1,081 2,234 UK 2009-2011
Incidence rate per million population2 276.0 264.1 270.2
Number of deaths per year1 181 130 311 UK 2009-2011
Mortality rate per million population2 43.5 31.8 37.8
Five-year survival rate 81.4% 84.4% - UK 2001-2005

1. Average of the last three years, including benign, uncertain or unknown behaviour brain, CNS and intracranial tumours    2. European age-standardised    3. Latest statistics available

More detailed teenage and young adult cancer statistics can be found using these links: incidence, survival, mortality and risk factors.

section reviewed 21/05/14
section updated 21/05/14

No Error

Rate this page:
Submit rating
Rate this page
Rate this page for no comments box
Please enter feedback to continue submitting
Send feedback
Question about cancer? Contact our information nurse team
Updated: 27 January 2015