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Types of stomach cancer

Men and woman discussing stomach cancer

This page tells you about the different types of stomach cancer. There is information on

 

A quick guide to what's on this page

Types of stomach cancer

More than 95 out of every 100 stomach cancers diagnosed (95%) are adenocarcinomas. This means the cancer starts in gland cells in the stomach lining. Gland cells normally produce mucus and stomach juices.

Squamous cell carcinoma starts in the skin like cells that are mixed with gland cells to make the stomach lining. These cancers are treated in the same way as adenocarcinomas.

Rare cancers found in the stomach include lymphoma, gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GIST) and neuroendocrine tumours (NET). These are all treated differently. GISTs and NETs can be cancerous or non cancerous (benign). For lymphomas, look at our section on non Hodgkin's lymphoma. For GIST, you need the soft tissue sarcoma section. For neuroendocrine tumours, look at the carcinoid section.

 

CR PDF Icon You can view and print the quick guides for all the pages in the about stomach cancer section.

 

 

Adenocarcinoma of the stomach

Adenocarcinoma is the most common type of stomach cancer. More than 95 out of every 100 stomach cancers (95%) diagnosed are adenocarcinomas. The cancer starts in the gland cells in the stomach lining. The gland cells produce mucus and stomach juices.

 

Squamous cell cancers

Squamous cells are the skin like cells that lie between gland cells to make the stomach lining. These cancers are treated in the same way as adenocarcinomas.

 

Lymphoma of the stomach

Lymphoma is another type of cancer altogether. It is very rare. There is a whole section on non Hodgkin lymphoma, which will be more relevant to you if you have been diagnosed with lymphoma of the stomach.

 

Gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST)

GISTs can be cancerous or non cancerous (benign). These rare tumours develop from the cells of the connective tissue that support the organs of the digestive (gastrointestinal) tract. Most are found in the stomach. We have information about GIST and its treatment in our question and answer section.

 

Neuroendocrine tumours

Neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) can be cancerous or non cancerous. They grow in hormone producing tissues, usually in the digestive system. They are rare, but the most common is carcinoid tumour. We have detailed information about carcinoid tumours on this website.

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Updated: 11 February 2014