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Seeing your GP

Find out what happens when you see your GP and how to get the most out of your appointment.

When to see your GP

You should see your doctor if you notice a change that isn't normal for you or if you have any of the possible signs and symptoms of cancer.

Even if you're worrying about what the symptom might be, don't delay seeing them. Your worry is unlikely to go away if you don't make an appointment. The symptom might not be due to cancer. But if it is, the earlier it's picked up the higher the chance of successful treatment. You won't be wasting your doctor's time.

Try not to be embarrassed. What you tell your GP is confidential. Doctors are used to discussing intimate problems and will try to put you at ease.

Tell your GP if you are concerned about prostate cancer because friends or family members have the condition. They can talk to you about the pros and cons of having a PSA blood test.

Getting the most out of your GP appointment

When you see the doctor it can be difficult to remember everything you want to say. These tips will help you get the most out of your appointment.

Tips

  • Write down your symptoms including when they started, when they happen and how often you have them.
  • Write down if anything makes them worse or better.
  • Tell your GP if you are worried about cancer in particular.
  • Tell them if you have any family history of cancer.
  • Take a friend or relative along for support - they could also ask questions and help you remember what the GP says.
  • Ask the GP to explain anything you don’t understand.
  • Ask the GP to write things down for you if you think it might help.
  • Find out before your appointment if family members have had prostate or breast cancer.

What happens during your GP appointment

Your doctor needs to build up a picture of what's going on. So they will ask you some questions. These include:

  • what symptoms you have
  • when you get them
  • whether anything makes them better or worse

They will ask you about your general health and any other medical conditions you have. During the appointment your doctor may want to examine you. 

Depending on your symptoms and test results your doctor might:

  • be able to reassure you
  • refer you to the hospital to see a specialist

Ask your GP to explain if they don't think you need a referral. They might ask you to come back in a week or two if your symptoms continue. Go back if they change or get worse.

Tests your GP might do

PSA blood test

PSA is a protein produced by both normal and cancerous prostate cells. It is normal for all men to have some PSA in their blood. A high level of PSA can be a sign of cancer. But your PSA level can also be raised in prostate conditions that are not cancer (are benign) or infection.

A PSA test on its own doesn't normally diagnose prostate cancer. Men over 50 can ask their doctor for a prostate specific antigen (PSA) blood test. There is evidence from the research that doing a PSA test doesn't saves lives. Your GP will discuss the test with you.

Physical examination

When your doctor examines you it might include feeling your prostate gland. Your doctor puts a gloved finger into your back passage (rectum) to check for abnormal signs, such as a lumpy, hard prostate. Doctors call this test a digital rectal examination (DRE).

It is normal to feel a bit anxious about this test and it might be uncomfortable But it usually only takes a few minutes.

Your doctor might also check your blood pressure, heart rate and temperature.

Questions you might want to ask your GP

  • Do I need to see a specialist? Is it urgent?
  • When will I see them?
  • Will I find out about my appointments by post or telephone?
  • Do I need tests? What will they involve?
  • How long should I expect to wait?
  • Where can I find out more about tests?
  • Do I have to do anything in preparation for this test?
  • When will I get the results and who will tell me?

Your GP might not be able to answer all of your questions. They will tell you what they can at this point. Not knowing is difficult to cope with and can make you anxious.

If they don't think you need any tests or a referral

  • Can you explain to me why I don’t need to have tests or see a specialist?
  • Is there anything I can do to help myself?
  • Do I need to see you again?
  • Who do I contact if my symptoms continue or get worse, especially during the night or at weekends?
  • I've been reading about prostate cancer and wish to have a PSA test – can you explain why I don’t need one?

What happens next

Make sure you know what happens next. Make another appointment if your symptoms don’t clear up, or if they change or get worse.

How to find a GP

If you don’t have a GP, you can find a doctor’s surgery in your local area by going to:

Making a GP appointment

You can book an appointment online at most GP surgeries. Or you can telephone them or go in person. You don’t have to tell the receptionist what you want to see the doctor for. Tell them if you would prefer to see a male or female doctor. 

Try different times of the day if it's difficult to get through by phone. Your surgery might have a clinic you can turn up to and wait to see a doctor. You might have to wait a long time but you’ll see a doctor that day.

If it’s difficult to get to the surgery, check whether your practice has telephone appointments with a doctor or nurse practitioner. They’ll tell you if you need to go in to see them at the surgery.

Accept a booked appointment, even if you think it’s a long time to wait. You could ask about cancellations if you are able to get to the practice at short notice.

During the appointment your doctor may want to examine you. If you would rather see a male or a female doctor it is worth asking when you book the appointment.

Information and help

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About Cancer generously supported by Dangoor Education since 2010.