Gallbladder cancer incidence statistics

Cases

New cases of gallbladder cancer, 2014, UK

 

Proportion of all cases

Percentage gallbladder cancer is of total cancer cases, 2014, UK

 

Age

Peak rate of gallbladder cancer cases, 2012-2014, UK

 

Trend over time

Change in gallbladder cancer incidence rates since the early 1990s, UK

Gallbladder cancer accounts for less than 1% of all new cases in the UK (2014), accounting for less than 1% of all male cases, and less than 1% of all female cases.[1-4]

In 2014, there were 975 new cases of gallbladder cancer in the UK: 251 (26%) in men and 724 (74%) in females, giving a male:female ratio of around 3:10.[1-4] The crude incidence rate Open a glossary item shows that there are less than one new case for every 100,000 males in the UK, and 2 for every 100,000 females.

Gallbladder cancer is one of the few cancers which can occur in both sexes but is more common in women than men. This is at least partly due to sex differences in exposure to risk factors.

The European age-standardised rates Open a glossary item (AS rates) do not differ significantly between the constituent countries of the UK for either sex.

Gallbladder Cancer (C23), Number of New Cases, Crude and European Age-Standardised (AS) Incidence Rates per 100,000 Population, UK, 2014

England Wales Scotland Northern Ireland UK
Male Cases 218 10 18 5 251
Crude Rate 0.8 0.7 0.7 0.6 0.8
AS Rate 1.0 0.7 0.8 0.8 1.0
AS Rate - 95% LCL 0.9 0.3 0.4 0.1 0.8
AS Rate - 95% UCL 1.1 1.1 1.1 1.4 1.1
Female Cases 612 32 58 22 724
Crude Rate 2.2 2.0 2.1 2.3 2.2
AS Rate 2.2 1.9 2.0 2.7 2.2
AS Rate - 95% LCL 2.1 1.2 1.5 1.6 2.1
AS Rate - 95% UCL 2.4 2.5 2.6 3.8 2.4
Persons Cases 830 42 76 27 975
Crude Rate 1.5 1.4 1.4 1.5 1.5
AS Rate 1.7 1.4 1.5 1.8 1.7
AS Rate - 95% LCL 1.6 0.9 1.2 1.1 1.6
AS Rate - 95% UCL 1.8 1.8 1.8 2.5 1.8

95% LCL and 95% UCL are the 95% lower and upper confidence limits Open a glossary item round the AS Rate Open a glossary item

For gallbladder cancer, like most cancer types, differences between countries largely reflect risk factor prevalence in years past.

References

  1. Data were provided by the Office for National Statistics on request, June 2016. Similar data can be found here: http://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/healthandsocialcare/conditionsanddiseases/bulletins/cancerregistrationstatisticsengland/previousReleases.
  2. Data were provided by ISD Scotland on request, May 2016. Similar data can be found here: http://www.isdscotland.org/Health-Topics/Cancer/Publications/.
  3. Data were provided by the Welsh Cancer Intelligence and Surveillance Unit, Health Intelligence Division, Public Health Wales on request, June 2016. Similar data can be found here: http://www.wcisu.wales.nhs.uk.
  4. Data were provided by the Northern Ireland Cancer Registry on request, May 2016. Similar data can be found here: http://www.qub.ac.uk/research-centres/nicr/

About this data

Data is for: UK, 2014, ICD-10 C23

Last reviewed:

Gallbladder cancer incidence is strongly related to age, with the highest incidence rates being in older males and females. In the UK in 2012-2014, on average each year more than half (52%) of cases were diagnosed in people aged 75 and over.[1-4]

Age-specific incidence rates rise sharply from around age 50-54, peak in the 90+ age group for males and the 85-89 age group for females. Incidence rates are higher for females than for males for those aged 50-54 and over and this gap is widest at the ages of 90+, when the female:male ratio of age-specific incidence rates (to account for the different proportions of males to females in each age group) is around 17:10.[1-4]

Gallbladder Cancer (C23), Average Number of New Cases per Year and Age-Specific Incidence Rates, UK, 2012-2014

For gallbladder cancer, like most cancer types, incidence increases with age. This largely reflects cell DNA damage accumulating over time. Damage can result from biological processes or from exposure to risk factors. A drop or plateau in incidence in the oldest age groups often indicates reduced diagnostic activity perhaps due to general ill health.

Reference

  1. Data were provided by the Office for National Statistics on request, June 2016. Similar data can be found here: http://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/healthandsocialcare/conditionsanddiseases/bulletins/cancerregistrationstatisticsengland/previousReleases.
  2. Data were provided by ISD Scotland on request, May 2016. Similar data can be found here: http://www.isdscotland.org/Health-Topics/Cancer/Publications/.
  3. Data were provided by the Welsh Cancer Intelligence and Surveillance Unit, Health Intelligence Division, Public Health Wales on request, June 2016. Similar data can be found here: http://www.wcisu.wales.nhs.uk.
  4. Data were provided by the Northern Ireland Cancer Registry on request, May 2016. Similar data can be found here: http://www.qub.ac.uk/research-centres/nicr/.

About this data

Data is for UK, 2014, ICD-10 C23

Last reviewed:

Gallbladder cancer incidence rates have increased overall in the UK since the early 1990s.[1-3] However, this includes a period of stability followed by an increase and the trend is similar for males and females combined and separately.[1-4] Gallbladder cancer incidence rates decreased by 20% (persons) in Great Britain between 1979-1981 and 1991-1993.[1-3]

For males, European age-standardised (AS) Open a glossary item incidence rates remained stable between 1993-1995 and 2001-2003, and have subsequently increased by 42% (between 2002-2004 and 2012-2014). This change is similar for females, with rates remaining stable between 1993-1995 and 2001-20034, subsequently increasing by 59% (between 2001-2003 and 2012-2014).[1-4]

Over the last decade in the UK (between 2003-2005 and 2012-2014), gallbladder cancer AS incidence rates have increased by 45% for males and females combined, with a similar increase for males (42%) and females (47%) separately.[1-4]

Gallbladder Cancer (C23), European Age-Standardised Incidence Rates, UK, 1993-2014

Gallbladder cancer incidence rates have increased overall for most of the broad age groups in the UK since the early 1990s but have remained stable in people aged between 25-49 and 50-59.[1-3] The largest increase has been in people aged 70-79, with European AS incidence rates rising by 57% between 1993-1995 and 2012-2014.

Gallbladder Cancer (C23), European Age-Standardised Incidence Rates, by Age, Persons, UK, 1993-2014 

For gallbladder cancer, like most cancer types, incidence trends largely reflect changing prevalence of risk factors and improvements in diagnosis and data recording. Recent incidence trends are influenced by risk factor prevalence in years past, and trends by age group reflect risk factor exposure in birth cohorts.

References

  1. Data were provided by the Office for National Statistics on request, June 2016. Similar data can be found here: http://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/healthandsocialcare/conditionsanddiseases/bulletins/cancerregistrationstatisticsengland/previousReleases
  2. Data were provided by ISD Scotland on request, May 2016. Similar data can be found here: http://www.isdscotland.org/Health-Topics/Cancer/Publications/ 
  3. Data were provided by the Welsh Cancer Intelligence and Surveillance Unit, Health Intelligence Division, Public Health Wales on request, June 2016. Similar data can be found here: http://www.wcisu.wales.nhs.uk
  4. Data were provided by the Northern Ireland Cancer Registry on request, May 2016. Similar data can be found here: http://www.qub.ac.uk/research-centres/nicr/

About this data

Data is for UK, 1993-2014, ICD-10 C23

Last reviewed:

The lifetime risk of developing gallbladder cancer is around 1 in 1,310 for men and around 1 in 550 for women, in 2012 in the UK.[1]

The lifetime risk for gallbladder cancer has been calculated on the assumption that the possibility of having more than one diagnosis of gallbladder cancer over the course of a lifetime is very low (‘Current Probability’ method).[2]

References

  1. Lifetime risk estimates calculated by the Statistical Information Team at Cancer Research UK. Based on data provided by the Office of National Statistics, ISD Scotland, the Welsh Cancer Intelligence and Surveillance Unit and the Northern Ireland Cancer Registry, on request, December 2013 to July 2014.
  2. Esteve J, Benhamou E and Raymond L. Descriptive epidemiology. IARC Scientific Publications No.128, Lyon, International Agency for Research on Cancer, pp 67-68 1994.
Last reviewed:

An estimated 3,600 people who had been diagnosed with gallbladder cancer between 1991 and 2010 were alive in the UK at the end of 2010.[1]

References

  1. Macmillan Cancer Support and National Cancer Registration and Analysis Service. Cancer Prevalence UK Data Tables. London: NCRAS; 2015.

About this data

Data is for: Great Britain (1991-2010) and Northern Ireland (1993-2010), ICD-10 C23

Last reviewed:

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