Cancer news

Latest news, press releases and blog posts from Cancer Research UK.

News Post List

Could Mother Nature’s clinical trial help prevent more cancers?

By studying small differences in our DNA, called SNPs, our scientists are showing how these could be used to help prevent cancer in the future.

Six months of breast cancer treatment ‘could be as effective as 12’ in some women with early stage disease

Six months of treatment could be as effective as 12 months for women with a type of early stage breast cancer, according to unpublished clinical trial results.

Brain tumour funding boost following death of Tessa Jowell

The Government has announced it will double a recent funding boost for brain tumour research following the death of Dame Tessa Jowell.

News digest – HPV vaccine, exercise, alcohol labels and ‘tanning genes’

This week’s top stories: HPV vaccine is safe and effective and London Mayor to ban junk food ads on public transport.

London Mayor plans junk food ad ban on public transport

Mayor of London Sadiq Khan has revealed plans to impose a ban on junk food advertising on public transport, in a bid to tackle childhood obesity.

HPV vaccine is safe and reduces cell changes that can become cancer

A vaccine to prevent cervical cancer is safe and effective in reducing cell changes, a new review has confirmed.

Prostate cancer diagnosis: how scientists are working to get it right

Questions are being asked of the tests used to diagnose prostate cancer, and how they can be improved. We cover the latest research, including specialist MRI.

News digest – breast screening error, gene tests, childhood obesity and mobile phones

This week’s top story: Around 450,000 women in England weren’t invited for their final breast screening appointment due to an error with NHS computers.

Breast screening error: women need reassurance, not misleading statistics

In the immediate aftermath, estimating the numbers affected by a breast screening error might do more harm than good.

Vigorous exercise reduces tiredness in testicular cancer survivors

High intensity interval training reduces tiredness and improves self-esteem for testicular cancer survivors.

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