Cancer news

Latest news, press releases and blog posts from Cancer Research UK.

Preventing Cancer

Government’s updated childhood obesity plan has bold ambitions. Now it needs urgent implementation

The Government has launched its ambition to halve childhood obesity by 2030. To reach this, junk food marketing restrictions must be introduced without delay.

Combining heartburn drugs and aspirin could help prevent oesophageal cancer in people at high risk

Two over-the-counter, widely available drugs could help cut cases of oesophageal cancer in people at higher risk of the disease.

Taking aspirin and anti-acid reflux medication prevents oesophageal cancer in high risk patients

Taking an anti-acid reflux medication together with a low dose of aspirin can prevent oesophageal cancer in people with a high risk of the disease.

Could Mother Nature’s clinical trial help prevent more cancers?

By studying small differences in our DNA, called SNPs, our scientists are showing how these could be used to help prevent cancer in the future.

Six in seven women at high risk of breast cancer shun tamoxifen as a preventative measure

Six in seven women with a family history of breast cancer opt out of taking tamoxifen as a preventative measure, according to a study.

5 ways research can help prevent cancer

Following our research on how lifestyle affects cancer risk, we look at how research into vaccines, screening and drugs could also help prevent cancers.

Soft drinks sugar tax to tackle obesity ‘has already had an effect’

A ‘sugar tax’ on drinks has come into force today. Campaigners hope it will reduce obesity levels and improve health.

New calculations confirm lifestyle changes could prevent 4 in 10 cancer cases

Our new research shows that more than 135,000 cases of cancer could be prevented in the UK each year largely through lifestyle changes.

Obesity risk doubles for teens bombarded with junk food adverts

Teenagers are more than twice as likely to be obese if they remember seeing a junk food advert every day compared to those who couldn’t recall any in a month.

Binge watching TV could increase bowel cancer risk in men

Sitting down to watch more than four hours of TV over a day could increase the risk of bowel cancer in men compared to those watching less than just an hour.

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