Cancer news

Latest news, press releases and blog posts from Cancer Research UK.

Diagnosing Cancer

Computer simulation suggests risk-based breast screening could have benefits

New computer simulation study suggests only screening women deemed at a ‘high risk’ of breast cancer could help to reduce unnecessary diagnoses.

‘Our NHS is there for us, now it’s time to stand with them’

We've launched a campaign for more NHS staff to diagnose and treat cancer. Cancer survivor Elizabeth Bailey explains how you can get involved.

Prostate cancer diagnosis: how scientists are working to get it right

Questions are being asked of the tests used to diagnose prostate cancer, and how they can be improved. We cover the latest research, including specialist MRI.

Breast screening error: women need reassurance, not misleading statistics

In the immediate aftermath, estimating the numbers affected by a breast screening error might do more harm than good.

Unclear if cancer test funding is being used as intended

NHS funding designed to improve cancer early diagnosis might not be reaching the right services, according to a new report.

Prostate MRI scans could help some men avoid invasive biopsy

More than a quarter of men with suspected prostate cancer could avoid invasive biopsies if they’re offered an MRI scan first, a new study suggests.

Overdiagnosis: when finding cancer can do more harm than good

With new cancer detection technology on the horizon, ranging from blood tests to wristbands, understanding overdiagnosis is a huge challenge.

A routine blood test for cancer would be fantastic. Today’s news isn’t it

A cancer blood test is in the news today, but it's too early to say if it will work. We take a look at what questions still need to be answered.

Proportion of cancers diagnosed in A&E falling

The way in which cancers are diagnosed in England is improving, according to new figures.

Genetic link between breast condition and invasive breast cancer uncovered

The genetics behind how a breast condition becomes invasive breast cancer may be explained by a new study.

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