Children's cancer news

Children develop different types of cancers than adults, with around 1,900 children under the age of 14 diagnosed each year. The most common types of childhood cancer are acute leukaemia and cancers of the brain and spinal cord. Thanks to research into new treatments, 8 in 10 children diagnosed with cancer will live for at least five years.

New drug targeting high-risk children’s cancer is ready for trials

A new drug that has passed safety tests in adults is likely to be effective against the aggressive childhood cancer neuroblastoma.

Children and young people with cancer who have relapsed can get rapid access to new treatments, thanks to new Cancer Research UK trial

Children and young people in the UK with cancers that have come back can now access new personalised treatments quicker than ever before.

Targeted drug improves survival for children with non-Hodgkin lymphoma

New clinical trial results show that adding rituximab to standard chemotherapy could improve survival for some children with non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

Young cancer survivor gets unforgettable festive treat as he meets the Snowman

Six-year-old Karos Rasoul from London gets a Christmas treat meeting the cast of Birmingham Repertory Theatre’s The Snowman at The Peacock, London.

Different challenges, same determination: how we’re tackling children’s and young people’s cancers

Through our new research strategy, we're determined to improve survival and reduce long-term side effects for children and young people with cancer.

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