Cancer news

The latest news in cancer research, health and policy by Cancer Research UK.

We cover developments in cancer treatments, research into cancer risk and diagnosis as well as the latest cancer science stories. You'll also find analysis and comment on health and cancer policy. 

Cancer Biology

Blood test could predict best treatment for lung cancer

A blood test could predict how well small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) patients will respond to treatment, according to new research published in Nature Medicine.

Scientists discover cells that may fuel brain tumour growth

A US study has found a group of cells that fuel the growth of a particular type of brain tumour.

‘Surprising’ imbalance in cell growth could help oesophageal cancers form

Oesophageal cancers could stem from more than just cells growing out of control.

Acute myeloid leukaemia is 11 different diseases

Researchers studying the genetic make-up of an aggressive blood cancer, AML, have discovered that it exists in at least 11 different forms.

DNA analysis brings scientists step closer to ‘complete picture’ of breast cancer

An analysis of the complete genetic code of hundreds of breast tumours could lead to more personalised care for patients.

Immunotherapy and chemo combination shows early promise for pancreatic cancer

An experimental drug that stimulates the immune system, used in combination with chemotherapy, shrank tumours in patients with pancreatic cancer.

Scientists discover new way to tackle challenging children’s brain tumours

Scientists have discovered why a curable type of children’s brain tumour is so responsive to chemotherapy.

Researchers uncover weakness in leukaemia cells

UK scientists have found that a pair of genes inside cells could play a major role in how a serious form of leukaemia develops.

Prostate cancer is five different diseases

Scientists have for the first time identified that there are five distinct types of prostate cancer and found a way to distinguish between them.

Common hormone could help treat breast cancer

Around half of all breast cancer patients could one day benefit from having the cheap and widely-available female hormone progesterone added to their treatment.

Pages