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Re: Low grade dyskaryosis

24 Jan 2018 09:33 in response to CRUK Nurse Georgina

Hi

I've just had my first ever abnormal smear result (no HPV found) so the letter says my screening tests will carry on as normal. While I was trying to find out more information about low grade dyskaryosis (there wasn't much in the letter) I found that the NHS in Scotland retests after 6 months.... Why is there such a big difference in retest times between Scotland and England? Its not very reassuring

Re: Low grade dyskaryosis

25 Jan 2018 09:57 in response to Blinks

Hello Blinks and thanks for posting,

The English and Scottish screening service have a slightly different ways of doing things. In England HPV is used as an additional test (called HPV triage) for women with low grade dyskariosis. This doesn’t happen in Scotland and explains why there is a difference in the re-test times.

There is more information about this on the website of another charity, Jo’s Trust, at this link.

It can take years and years, but persistent HPV is necessary for abnormal cells to go on and develop into cancer. So being HPV negative for now is very reassuring even with some low grade cells changes.

HPV usually causes no harm because the immune system gets rid of it. But in a few women if it persists, it can cause abnormal cervical cells which over time could have the potential to develop into cancer.  From picking up HPV it usually takes a long time, a decade or even more, for cervical cancer to develop.

I hope this helps.

Best wishes,

Julia 

Re: Low grade dyskaryosis

7 Feb 2018 21:00 in response to CRUK Nurse Julia

I've also had a letter with low grade dyskaryosis and no HPV infection. Letter says that I'll be invited for my usual routine smear in 3 years so I'm guessing nothing to worry about.

I did have my smear test 3 months after having a baby. Could pregnancy and birth have caused abnormal cells?

Re: Low grade dyskaryosis

8 Feb 2018 12:06 in response to Maygirl28

Hello Maygirl and thanks for your post

Pregnancy can make the result of the cervical screening test harder to interpret and could be inaccurate. So it's usually recommended that women wait until 3 months ( 12 weeks) after giving birth before having a smear test.

We get a lot of enquiries from women who have had abnormal smear results. So it seems to be common enough to be worried when this happens, but do bear in mind that the cervical screening programme is designed to prevent cancer. Most smears are normal, but if a smear has picked up abnormal cells it has done its job.

In the NHS, when low grade cell changes (dyskaryosis) are seen, they test for HPV and if negative, it means you’re at very low risk of developing cervical cancer before your next screening test. So you will be invited for your next cervical screening in three years’ time. You can read more about this by clicking here 

Cervical screening is very successful so as long as you go along for your appointment and follow the advice given everything should be okay.

I hope that helps. Remember you can always give us a call if you want to talk anything over. Our number is 0808 800 4040 and we are hear from 9am to 5pm Monday to Friday.

Take care,

Celene

Re: Low grade dyskaryosis

9 Feb 2018 20:04 in response to CRUK Nurse Celene
Hi, I too have a letter stating low grade and no hpv. I haven’t have sex with a man in about 17 years some I’m wondering how this has happened ? I’m very confused

Re: Low grade dyskaryosis

11 Feb 2018 15:23 in response to lorraines

Hi All, I also received a letter that i have low grade dyskaryosis and also HPV Infection, the thing that is bothering me in 2010 i had abnormal cells as well and was cleared in 2014 that my cells was normal and my other smear test will be done in 3 years, i had only had one partner from 2016 ( 2 partners all my life), so its just bothering me why it came back ,although in 2010 i wasn't told that i had HPV, why did my cells become abnormal again,does this mean in the long run there is a chance of me getting cervical cancer, as reading about HPV is said to be a sexually transmitted disease, and i had only 2 partners in my life, so please if someone can explain to me how or why did this happen. I have been given an appointment in a months time to go and do colposcopy, but i cant wait as i'm a bit worried , going to do it privately. Also would i give this infection to anyone ??

I am a smoker but have stopped smoking and started E Cigarettes.

Re: Low grade dyskaryosis

12 Feb 2018 15:05 in response to lorraines

Hello Lorraines,

Thanks for posting a question. I am sorry to learn that you have had an abnormal cervical screening (smear test) result.

Doctors know that infection with high risk strains of the human papillomavirus (HPV) causes high grade dyskaryosis (severely abnormal cells).  While low grade dyskaryosis (mildly abnormal cells) can occur with or without high risk HPV being present. When HPV is present it is usually picked up from skin to skin contact normally during sex. But you don’t have high risk HPV and so how it is picked up is not relevant to your case.  Without  HPV your abnormal cells are likely to go back to normal without any treatment.

I am afraid that I don’t know why your recent test was abnormal. But low grade dyskaryosis can occur for a number of different reasons and there is not always an obvious cause. Sometimes menopausal changes can show up as mildly abnormal cell changes. Smokers are also more likely to have an abnormal test result. Other infections, and using vaginal creams and lubricant can also cause the cells to look abnormal.

I hope that this helps.

All the best

Jean

 

Re: Low grade dyskaryosis

21 Feb 2018 09:55 in response to CRUK Nurse Jean
Good morning, My partner received results from a smear test yesterday advising that she had low grade dyskaryosis and evidence of HPV, so she is now waiting for a colposcopy appointment. I have read through this very helpful thread but I was just hoping to clarify my understanding. Am I correct in saying that cancer is not currently present from the results indicated, rather the worst case (depending on the results of colposcopy) is that there is the potential for cancer to develop in the future if untreated? Is treatment easy and reliable? Thanks in advance

Re: Low grade dyskaryosis

21 Feb 2018 15:15 in response to mwnn

Hello and thanks for your post

Low grade dyskaryosis means there is only a slight change in the cells. It doesn’t mean that your partner has cancer. But when low grade changes are seen, they test for HPV and when positive, the next step is to take a closer look at the cervix under magnification (colposcopy) . Depending on what this shows, (a biopsy may be needed as well). Abnormal cells can either be treated to prevent cancer from developing in the future or they can be monitored until they go back to normal.

Cervical screening is very successful so as long as your partner goes along for her appointments and follows the advice given then everything is likely to be okay.

I hope that helps. Feel free to give us a call if you want to talk anything over. Our number is 0808 800 4040 and we are hear from 9am to 5pm Monday to Friday.

Take care,

Celene

Re: Low grade dyskaryosis

21 Feb 2018 15:48 in response to CRUK Nurse Celene

Hi All, I also received a letter that i have low grade dyskaryosis and also HPV Infection, the thing that is bothering me in 2010 i had abnormal cells as well and was cleared in 2014 that my cells was normal and my other smear test will be done in 3 years, i had only had one partner from 2016 ( 2 partners all my life), so its just bothering me why it came back ,although in 2010 i wasn't told that i had HPV, why did my cells become abnormal again,does this mean in the long run there is a chance of me getting cervical cancer, as reading about HPV is said to be a sexually transmitted disease, and i had only 2 partners in my life, so please if someone can explain to me how or why did this happen. I have been given an appointment in a months time to go and do colposcopy, but i cant wait as i'm a bit worried , going to do it privately. Also would i give this infection to anyone ??

I am a smoker but have stopped smoking and started E Cigarettes.

Re: Low grade dyskaryosis

22 Feb 2018 07:34 in response to CRUK Nurse Celene
Dear Celene, thank you for your response, which has certainly helped to comfort me. Regards

Re: Low grade dyskaryosis

22 Feb 2018 17:06 in response to Fankaloza

Hello Frankaloza and thank you for your post.

You appear to have posted twice, so I am sorry for any delay replying to your post.

It is important to say that you are very unlikely to have cervical cancer, and as long as you attend for cervical screening you are very unlikely to develop cervical cancer.

The NHS Cervical Screening Programme (NHSCSP) is about prevention. The idea is to detect abnormal cells and then further assess them to decide whether to monitor until things go back to normal, or treat to prevent cancer from developing in the future. Not everyone with abnormal cells goes on to develop cancer. The NHSCSP follows internationally recognised guidelines and women are automatically followed up. If you attend a gynaecologist privately for an abnormal smear the examination and test results are not recorded in your NHSCSP record. There is no difference between private and NHS management of abnormal cells, and while you will be advised about follow up this is less likely to be done automatically.

It is only in the past few years that HPV testing has been introduced so it is unlikely that you were tested for HPV in 2010. It may help to explain about HPV.

The majority of high grade abnormal cell changes on the cervix detected by cervical screening are caused by HPV. Low grade changes are not always linked to HPV. It is not possible to tell what the cause of your low grade smear was in 2010.

HPV is a common infection and it is estimated that most people who are sexually active will get HPV at some stage in their lives. Most people will have no symptoms and their immune system will clear it up in a year or two without them ever knowing they had it. It is not possible to tell when a person got HPV or how long they have had it. While condoms offer some protection against HPV they are not a complete protection. Abnormal cell changes caused by HPV can go back to normal if a person’s immune system clears HPV, this is more likely if the changes are low grade.

HPV can persist (not clear) in some women and if this causes high grade abnormal changes these may develop further into cancer (over years and years). Not all women with high grade abnormal cells go on to develop cancer. But as we do not know which women are more at risk, all women with high grade changes are offered treatment. Low grade changes are usually not treated unless they persist (don’t go away) over a period of time. It is not known what causes persistent HPV but it is more common in people who smoke as this may affect their immune system. However, it is not possible to say if this is the situation in your case.

Men are thought to be less affected by HPV, your partner’s immune system may well have cleared any HPV he was exposed to. If you meet a new partner he may also be immune, and if not immune is likely to develop immunity. There is no generally available test for men.

There is more information about HPV on our website on the link here.

Colposcopy examination is done to have a closer look at the cervix and detect the area of abnormality on your cervix causing the abnormal smear. If the colposcopist finds that there is an area that may be abnormal on your cervix a biopsy is taken. This is to have a closer look at the tissue and abnormal cells. The classification system used to describe the level of abnormality is called cervical intraepithelial neoplasia  (CIN). If you have low grade changes (CIN 1) on biopsy you will be advised to have a repeat smear in a year’s time. If you have high grade changes (CIN 2 or CIN 3) you will be advised to have a colposcopy treatment to remove the small area of abnormal cells on the cervix. You can read more about the different types of treatments used here

I am sorry as I can appreciate that this is a lot of information to take in but I hope that it puts your mind at rest. If you are unsure about any of this information or have any more questions you are welcome to get back to us on the forum, or give us a call us on 0808 800 4040. We are here from Monday to Friday, 9am to 5pm.

With kind regards,

Mary

 

Re: Low grade dyskaryosis

24 Feb 2018 05:39 in response to CRUK Nurse Mary
Hello I've just had an abnormal smear result showing low grade dyskaryosis and a positive hpv result. I had an abnormal result 25+ years ago and had the area lasered. My results have been fine ever since but I'm now a little concerned about why this one would be abnormal. Could the first abnormal result be due to hpv and now it's active again? If so, am I more likely to develop cancer as I've possibly had hpv for a long time? I'm married and have been for 25 years (no other partner in that time) . I was only 20 (and thought I was immortal!) when I had the first abnormal result and it really didn't worry me, but at 45 it seems a bit more scary! Thank you