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Low grade dyskaryosis

18 Jul 2016 21:56

Hi.. I have had severe dyskatyosis in the past and had a loop excision done.. That was 1 year ago.. I've just had a follow up smear and it is now saying low grade dyskaryosis.. And also positive for Hpv.. I have to have another colposcopy and I'm worried only last time I got a massive infection and was ill for 1 month.. Bleeding and discharge.. Soon a little scared to have the whole procedure again.. But I will..-also. Is it safe to still have sex with Hpv.. ? Only I haven't been told anything about this.. Can iPass it on to anyone else? Thanks 

 

Re: Low grade dyskaryosis

19 Jul 2016 14:50 in response to ShellBell

Hi ShellBell and thank you for your post.

The quick answer to your question is that it is okay to continue having sex. I am sorry to hear about your previous experience of colposcopy treatment. If low grade dyskaryosis is confirmed at colposcopy it is unlikely that would need treatment this time, you would be followed up with a smear in one year. Even if you needed another treatment it is unlikely that your first experience would happen again.

HPV is a common infection and it is estimated that most people who are sexually active will get HPV at some stage in their lives. Most people will have no symptoms and never know they had it. It is usually cleared by the immune system within a two to three year period. There is no treatment for HPV. Some types of HPV are known to cause abnormal changes that are more likely to persist (not go away), and in some women these changes may go on to cause cervical cancer.

It is not known why some women retain the HPV virus, nor is it known why a small proportion of those who do not clear the virus go on to develop cancer. Not all women with persist abnormal cells go on to develop cancer. There is usually a long transition period (10 years or more) in those women with untreated abnormal cells who go on to develop cancer. We know that women who smoke or who have a defective immune system retain the virus for longer and are at higher risk of developing cancer. Treatment is very effective at preventing cancer. There is more information on HPV and the other risks and causes of cervical cancer on the link here.

Men are less affected by HPV, your partner’s immune system may well have cleared any HPV he was exposed to. There is no reliable screening test for male genital HPV.

I hope that this information is helpful and that all goes well for you.

With kind regards,

Mary

 

Re: Low grade dyskaryosis

12 Jun 2017 10:35 in response to ShellBell

Hi i have just received a letter and i have exactly the same as you.  I am going for the examination in july. I am little worried about it.

 

Re: Low grade dyskaryosis

20 Jun 2017 20:35 in response to Pennyc

Re: low grade dyskaryosis Hi I'm new to the chat but I received a letter today saying that I had the same thing..& that the lab also checked my sample for HPV & that I have an HPV infection. I've never had a colposcopy but the Letter said they will get in touch to arrange an appointment for me. Just to let you ladies know your not alone xx

Re: Low grade dyskaryosis

24 Jun 2017 10:58 in response to veevee
Hi. Same letter today. Feel slightly panicked.

Re: Low grade dyskaryosis

26 Jun 2017 13:18 in response to Bee78
I am so relived there are other women posting about this, I got my Letter on the weekend and have done nothing but panic as I haven't had a period in over 2 months also but have had mild "period-esq" symptoms and now I'm worried it could be the worst as I can't find symptoms for it ANYWHERE only for things that are worse, it doesn't help that I came off the pill at around the same time (100% not pregnant) so my head is everywhere

Re: Low grade dyskaryosis

26 Jun 2017 16:53 in response to ChelseyP

Hi

I can see that there are a few of you who have been sent a letter after your smear test saying you have low grade dyskariosis. This means that you have some abnormal cervical cell changes which can be caused by HPV. This is not cancer. So please do not be panicked.

We have some useful information about abnormal cervical cells which you can read about here. Jo’s Cervical Cancer Trust  also has some useful information on this too. 

I am not sure I can add anything else to what my colleague Mary has said in the earlier post, so all I can suggest is you give us a call and speak to us on the phone, our number is 0808 800 4040. We are here from Monday to Friday, 9am to 5pm.

Best wishes,

Georgina

Re: Low grade dyskaryosis

27 Jun 2017 08:28 in response to CRUK Nurse Georgina
Thank you for the advice. Is it necessary to tell (ex) partner that you have HPV?

Re: Low grade dyskaryosis

29 Jun 2017 09:21 in response to Bee78

Hello Bee78 and thank you for your post.

This is a very reasonable question to ask, but like most questions around cervical screening it is not straight forward to answer. It is not possible to say when someone became infected with HPV, your situation may have had nothing to do with your ex-partner. Men are less affected by HPV. If your ex-partner was exposed to HPV with you, or if he was exposed to it previously it is very likely that he has cleared it. So telling him about your HPV is very unlikely to benefit him, and there is currently no test available for men.

HPV is often describe as endemic in the population, This means that it is very common and most people who are sexually active will be exposed to it at some point in their lives. Most people will never know that they had a HPV infection and will clear the infection within 2-3 years. There is no treatment for HPV.

Women in a stable relationship may choose to discuss HPV with their partners. If couples do discuss HPV it is important that both understand that it does not mean one partner is, or has been unfaithful.

I hope that this information is helpful and that things go well for you.

With kind regards,

Mary

Re: Low grade dyskaryosis

24 Jul 2017 15:10 in response to CRUK Nurse Georgina
i am very confused atm, i recieved a letter stating i have low grade dyskaryosis but hat i do not have an infection. there is no mention of a colposcopy. I am worrierd because my mum had to have a hysterectomy following abnormal cells being detected and that my nan died from cervical cancer.

Re: Low grade dyskaryosis

25 Jul 2017 13:33 in response to nuttybird

Hello nuttybird,

I can appreciate that getting abnormal results of a smear test can be worrying.  But having low grade dyskaryosis does not mean you have cancer.  You have a very mild change to some of the cells that cover your cervix. The infection you mention is the HPV (human papillomavirus) which can cause the cells of the cervix to be abnormal sometimes.  However HPV can be cleared by the body’s immune system.  Mild abnormal changes with no HPV infection are likely to disappear on its own or stay the same that is why you do not need to be seen in the colposcopy clinic.

In the UK the Cervical Screening Program uses up to date guidance on who needs to be followed up for a colposcopy.  The guidance is evidence based and takes into account the latest knowledge of why cells become abnormal and what needs to be done to stop them developing into cancer. In England, Northern Ireland and Wales it is only women with a low grade dyskaryosis who are HPV positive  that need to be seen in the colposcopy clinic.  For women who are HPV negative and a low grade dyskaryosis it is safe to resume regular screening in the Cervical Screening Programme.

You might find reading our information about abnormal cervical test results helpful,  click here to see it.

Also the UK Charity Jo’s Trust have information that you might find helpful to read, click here to see it.

And the NHS have some information here

I hope this has been reassuring to read but please do get back to us if you have any more questions or call us on 0808 800 4040. We are here from Monday to Friday, 9am to 5pm.

Take care

Caroline

Re: Low grade dyskaryosis

31 Aug 2017 08:01 in response to CRUK Nurse Caroline
Hello, What a wonderful thread this is being able to share our worries and concerns. I too received a letter in the post yesterday following a routine smear test explaining that I have low grade dyskaryosis and that I also have HPV infection. I am worried by this as I wonder how I contracted the virus in the first place. I am married, I am faithful and have not had sex with anyone else other than my husband, does this mean that he has been unfaithful to me?

Re: Low grade dyskaryosis

31 Aug 2017 16:04 in response to carabella

Hello Carabella,

Thanks for posting a question.

Doctors and scientists still have more to learn about HPV (the human papillomaviruses). But experts know that usually genital HPV clears up on its own in many women. But in some it does not completely go away. It can exist in very low levels, which may not cause any problems. But the virus can reactivate and cause abnormal cell changes many years down the line. This makes it difficult to know when anyone picked up HPV. You may have picked it up from your husband many years ago.  Also there are no reliable HPV tests for men making these things difficult to study.

So to answer your question, the fact that you have tested positive for high risk HPV certainly does not mean that your husband has definitely been unfaithful. during your marriage. If he had a previous partner he may have picked it up from them.  He would not have necessarily had full sex it. He could have picked it from a former partner by close genital skin to skin contact.

I hope this helps. Do contact us again if you think that it might be useful. If you would like to telephone our freephone number is 0808 8004040.  We are here from Monday to Friday between the hours of 9am to 5pm.

Kind regards,

Jean

 

Re: Low grade dyskaryosis

31 Aug 2017 17:25 in response to CRUK Nurse Jean

Thank you so much for your response Jean, that is really helpful and reassuring

Re: Low grade dyskaryosis

20 Sep 2017 13:45 in response to CRUK Nurse Jean
Hi I received my letter back stating I have low grade dyskaryosis with HPV infection. It does not say what grade HPV I have is there any way of finding out before my appointment? as this is very worrying for me. Like with me having low grade dyskaryosis does this mean that ther is only a slight change in my cells or does it mean that i could have cancer ?

Re: Low grade dyskaryosis

21 Sep 2017 14:00 in response to bex2017

Hello Bex,

You are right, low grade dyskariosis means there is only a slight change in the cells. It doesn’t mean you have cancer.

There are lots of different types of HPV. Some are called low risk and some are called high risk. The NHS screening programme tests for high risks types, but don’t be fazed by this. Let me explain a bit more about HPV. 

HPV is a very common infection which a lot of sexually active people pick up. Some types (low risk) are linked to warts and other types (high risk) HPV are linked to cell changes in the cervix. Most people who pick up high risk HPV come to no harm as their bodies clear the infection within a few months to a few years. When the HPV clears, the cervical cell changes go back to normal. If the HPV persists in the cervix, and abnormal cells develop and persist, then there is the chance they could develop into cancer over time. Usually this takes years and years. 

In the cervical screening programme if a woman has low grade changes like you do and HPV as well, the next step is a colposcopy assessment. I assume that this is what your  appointment is for. A colposcopy is when the cervix is examined under strong magnification and any abnormal areas can be seen and a biopsy can be taken if needed. If the biopsy shows high grade changes in cells they are usually treated (removed or destroyed). Low grade changes in cells can be monitored (repeat smear in 1 year) to see if they go back to normal. Remember cervical screening is all about prevention.

Do read what my colleagues have said on this post as well, but try not to worry.

If you would like a chat give us a call on 0808 800 4040, we are here from 9am to 5pm Monday to Friday.

All the best,

Julia

Re: Low grade dyskaryosis

22 Sep 2017 10:19 in response to CRUK Nurse Julia
Hi Julia thanx so much for your reply this has put my mind to ease a little. yes my appointment is for colposcopy and its on the 9.10.17. which im a little nervous for. is ther any questions i should be asking at my appointment, also will they tell me what they see on the screen? thanks again Bex.

Re: Low grade dyskaryosis

22 Sep 2017 17:17 in response to bex2017

Hello Bex and thank you for getting back to us.

It is understandable to feel a little nervous before any intimate medical examination. For this reason colposcopy clinics usually encourage women to bring someone with them for company and support. It is often hard to remember everything you have been told after an examination, so having someone else there is useful as they are more likely to remember what was said.

Before the colposcopy examination the procedure will be explained to you. The screen shows the cervix and it is usually possible for you to watch it while the colposcopist explains what they are doing. Don’t be afraid to ask questions at any time.

When the examination is finished the colposcopist will go over what they found. If a biopsy was taken they will advise you as to when you can expect the results. I would also ask for the contact details of who to contact if the results do not come in the time expected. Many colposcopy teams have a nurse specialist who give women information and support, and they are the person you will most likely be given the contact details for.

If a biopsy has been taken there is a small risk of bleeding or infection and you will be advised what to look out for and who to contact. This is usually your GP but if you are in any doubt you can contact the nurse specialist who can advise you.

I hope this is helpful and that things go well for you.

With kind regards,

Mary

 

Re: Low grade dyskaryosis

26 Sep 2017 14:03 in response to ShellBell

Hi in elli, I had acc of the tounge and had surgery part of my tounge removed n my lympnodes taken out on April 11 this 8tr and up 2 now I bin clear. I've just got my smear results and it's says low hpv positive and I'm a bit worried x

Re: Low grade dyskaryosis

26 Sep 2017 14:59 in response to Elli

Hi I'm elli i had scc ov the tounge and had surgery part of my tounge removed n my lympnodes taken out on April this year have bin clear I've just had my smear result bk and it *** no hpv positive and low grade dyskaryosis now I'm worried 

Re: Low grade dyskaryosis

26 Sep 2017 21:00 in response to Elli

Hi Elli and welcome to the forum.

I noticed you're a tad worried about the results from your smear so I just wanted to give you our cancer nurses telephone number in case you wanted to discuss the results with someone in more detail. Their freephone number is 0808 800 4040 and they are available Monday - Friday between 9a.m - 5p.m.

I hope this helps and you feel less worried soon.

All the best, 

Steph, Cancer Chat Moderator

Re: Low grade dyskaryosis

27 Sep 2017 10:16 in response to Elli

Hello Elli and thanks for posting,

The screening programme is designed to prevent cervical cancer. It does this by detecting cell changes that could one day develop into cancer (not all cell changes will and if they do it takes a long time). In the NHS, when low grade cell changes (dyskariosis) are seen, they test for HPV and if positive the next step is to take a closer look at the cervix under magnification (colposcopy). Depending on what this shows, (a biopsy may be needed as well), abnormal cells can either be treated to prevent cancer from developing in the future or they can be monitored until they go back to normal. But you have probably read our previous posts on this thread and already got the gist of how screening works.

Most women worry when they have an abnormal smear. I can appreciate that having been treated for mouth cancer, this may well trigger memories of earlier in the year and leave you feeling even more unsettled. Try and hold your nerve. Cervical screening is very successful so as long as you go along for your appointment and follow the advice given everything should be okay.

As Steph mentioned feel free to give us a call for a chat. Our number is 0808 800 4040 and we are here from Monday to Friday, 9am - 5pm.

Take care,

Julia

Re: Low grade dyskaryosis

28 Sep 2017 10:42 in response to CRUK Nurse Julia

Hi all,

I'm new to this forum and find it very informative. I have tried to give a call to the freephone but the line was busy, so I decided to post on this forum. Early this month, I received an abnormal result (low grade dyskaryosis) from my very first smear test screening with HPV positive. Following up from the result letter, I received another referral letter for colposcopy appointment; however the appointment won't be until mid of November 2017. I have called my GP and she said there's nothing to worry about even though the next appointment will be in few months after receiving my smear test result. I have also called the colposcopy department at the referred hospital and they confirmed me there are no earlier dates available than mid November. Yet, I am still feeling anxious whether I should go for the colposcopy earlier than November? Will there be any differences if I have the procedure now than in November? So far I do not have any complaints and feel normal as there are no vaginal discharges, bleedings or any pains. Any advice that can be provided to me to calm down my anxiety? 

Thank you.

 

Re: Low grade dyskaryosis

28 Sep 2017 15:41 in response to giegie

Hello Giegie,

Thank you for posting a question.  I am sorry to learn that you have has an abnormal smear test result.

It is not unusual for women to worry when the have an abnormal cervical screening (smear test) result, but this is not usually anything to be overly worried about. The aim of cervical screening is to pick up abnormal cells which if left untreated for many years (usually over 10) might change and develop into cervical cancer.  Monitoring or treating the abnormal cells can stop cervical cancer from developing.

It is not unusual for women with low grade cell changes to wait before they have a colposcopy appointment. Had the cells been more abnormal (high grade) you would be  seen sooner. Although this waiting is never easy it  is unlikely to cause you any harm.  In fact  in some UK  countries women with low grade cervical cell changes  don’t go to colposcopy right away, they are asked to have another smear in 6 months’ time.  I mention this to try to reassure you that a few months is not likely to be crucial. But of course this is not something that can be left for ever and ignored.

Recently in England there have been some changes and women with low grade cervical cell abnormalities have HPV  testing. This is because when certain types of HPV are present (known as high risk HPV)  the cells are less likely to get better on their own.  They might also become more abnormal. So rather than getting everyone with mildly abnormal cell changes to have a repeat smear, in England those who have HPV are seen at colposcopy and women without it are returned to routine screening.

So although it is easier said than done try not to worry because if you lived in another UK country you might not be going to colposcopy at this stage. 

I hope that this helps. If you have any other questions you are welcome to get back to us. If you would like to telephone do try again. Although from time to time our lines can be busy it is often relatively easy to get through. Sometimes but not always mid afternoon can be a good time to try.

All the best

Jean

 

Re: Low grade dyskaryosis

30 Sep 2017 21:47 in response to CRUK Nurse Jean

Hello Nurse Jean,

Thank you very much for your response. Your explanation indeed has helped me to understand a lot more now. I feel much better to receive a second opinion. 

Many thanks!

Re: Low grade dyskaryosis

15 Oct 2017 20:49 in response to CRUK Nurse Jean

Hi, 

i have recently had the same letter from my smear test, low grade dyskaryosis and positive for HPV. 

I have discussed this this with my partner and we’ve done a little research (this thread has been particularly helpful and relieving to read thank you) 

but we were wondering... as I have it, and my long term partner could already have it, we are aware it can clear up itself, but do we need to start using protection again until it has? We were worried about whether re-infection is possible? 

Also, we were planning on trying for a family in a year or so, does this diagnosis mean we need to wait till I get the all clear? Or can it affect my fertility in the long run? 

Re: Low grade dyskaryosis

19 Oct 2017 14:52 in response to Natatak

Hello Natatak,

Thank you for posting on Cancer Chat.

The current evidence about HPV is that once you have been infected with it many people become immune to that specific type and so reinfection should not occur but this may not happen for everyone.  Protecting yourself during sex might help reduce the risk of reinfection but there is no guarantee that it can.  This is because HPV is spread by skin to skin contact and a condom cannot provide this level of cover.

The best thing to do reduce your risk of developing cervical cancer is not to smoke as this can increase the risk of developing cervical cancer.  Also going for you cervical screening when you are invited is important in greatly reducing your risk of cervical cancer.  The NHS Cervical Screening Programme is designed to identify women who are at risk of developing cervical abnormalities, treating them if needed and then following these women up to ensure that there are no more abnormalities and greatly reducing the risk of cancer happening.

According to the UK charity Jo’s Trust recent evidence shows that having the HPV vaccine, even after you have had an infection with HPV, offers women protection from both infection with other HPV types and reinfection by the same type in the future. However, the vaccine is only available on the NHS for free until the age of 18.

HPV does not cause infertilety itself.  However for the small amount of women who get recurrent abnormal cells and need to have repeated areas of the cervix treated  (removal of cells on the cervix) this may affect the competency of the cervix to support the baby.  But this does not happen to the vast majority of women who have needed to have treatment on their cervix. Having said that if this was a risk there are procedures that can be done to help women have a baby safely.   Do speak with the colposcopy team about this when you go for your appointment to get some reassurance.

I hope this has been helpful.

Caroline

Re: Low grade dyskaryosis

24 Oct 2017 15:31 in response to CRUK Nurse Caroline
Hi Natatak I just wanted to reassure you a bit as you mentioned wanting a family. I had 5 consecutive years of positive smear tests in my 20s where through colonoscopy I had the abnormal cells removed by laser treatment. My cervix as a result lost its elasticity and could not fully dilate so I have had 3 C sections. I did however carry 3 boys without needing additional help. X

Re: Low grade dyskaryosis

16 Dec 2017 10:42 in response to Angela17

Hi All,

 

just to let you know, I am one more, having low grade dyskaryosis & HPV infection Happy Having an appointment mid Jan with NHS. I was planning to see a private doctor by that time, but as the nurses kindly said, there is going to be no harm for a few months time.

I'm sure we'll get through this ladies!

Just a bit worried as my mom and both my grandmothers were diagnosed with breast cancer so I am in the high risk team, I assume!

 

Have a great day!

Re: Low grade dyskaryosis

18 Dec 2017 15:56 in response to demy_z

Hi Demy_z

I saw your supportive post in response to the low grade dyskaryosis thread on our forum and I wanted to mention about your risk.

I see you are worried that your mom and grandmother’s diagnosis of breast cancer may put you in a ‘high risk team’.

I just wanted to say that it is very unlikely that your mom and grandmother’s diagnosis of breast cancer would increase your risk of developing cervical cancer. What we know is that to increase someone’s risk of developing cervical cancer, you would need to have had a mother, sister or daughter who have had cervical cancer. The evidence is not clear if this increased risk  is related to faulty genes or common lifestyle factors, for example smoking. You can read about risks and causes of cervical cancer here.

I think it is also important to know that having low grade dyskaryosis and HPV infection is not cancer. I don’t know how much you have read from the forum threads, but abnormal cervical cell changes occur usually because of a virus called HPV (human papillomavirus). There are more than 100 different strains of HPV. Some are classed as low risk HPV.  Low risk HPV can sometimes cause symptoms for example warts. Then there are the high-risk strains which have no symptoms. These are the ones known to cause cervical cell changes which if left untreated for many years might develop into cervical cancer.  

I assume your appointment in January is a colposcopy appointment. This is where they will have more detailed look at your cervix with a large magnifying glass (colposcope). They often use a solution called ascetic acid. This is a weak vinegar like solution that turns abnormal cells white. As you have tested positive to the HPV, if abnormal cells are found, you might require some form of treatment to remove them. There are several ways in which this can be done but you can read about the different types of treatment here. NHS choices also explains some of the treatment options. 

Although this is not related to your smear, I just wanted to mention that you may be at an increased risk of developing breast cancer due to your family history. You can read more about his here. You could speak with GP about this and they could assess your risk.

Thank you again for being so supportive on the forum.  And I hope this has been helpful and reassuring.

Best wishes

Georgina

Re: Low grade dyskaryosis

24 Jan 2018 09:33 in response to CRUK Nurse Georgina

Hi

I've just had my first ever abnormal smear result (no HPV found) so the letter says my screening tests will carry on as normal. While I was trying to find out more information about low grade dyskaryosis (there wasn't much in the letter) I found that the NHS in Scotland retests after 6 months.... Why is there such a big difference in retest times between Scotland and England? Its not very reassuring

Re: Low grade dyskaryosis

25 Jan 2018 09:57 in response to Blinks

Hello Blinks and thanks for posting,

The English and Scottish screening service have a slightly different ways of doing things. In England HPV is used as an additional test (called HPV triage) for women with low grade dyskariosis. This doesn’t happen in Scotland and explains why there is a difference in the re-test times.

There is more information about this on the website of another charity, Jo’s Trust, at this link.

It can take years and years, but persistent HPV is necessary for abnormal cells to go on and develop into cancer. So being HPV negative for now is very reassuring even with some low grade cells changes.

HPV usually causes no harm because the immune system gets rid of it. But in a few women if it persists, it can cause abnormal cervical cells which over time could have the potential to develop into cancer.  From picking up HPV it usually takes a long time, a decade or even more, for cervical cancer to develop.

I hope this helps.

Best wishes,

Julia 

Re: Low grade dyskaryosis

7 Feb 2018 21:00 in response to CRUK Nurse Julia

I've also had a letter with low grade dyskaryosis and no HPV infection. Letter says that I'll be invited for my usual routine smear in 3 years so I'm guessing nothing to worry about.

I did have my smear test 3 months after having a baby. Could pregnancy and birth have caused abnormal cells?

Re: Low grade dyskaryosis

8 Feb 2018 12:06 in response to Maygirl28

Hello Maygirl and thanks for your post

Pregnancy can make the result of the cervical screening test harder to interpret and could be inaccurate. So it's usually recommended that women wait until 3 months ( 12 weeks) after giving birth before having a smear test.

We get a lot of enquiries from women who have had abnormal smear results. So it seems to be common enough to be worried when this happens, but do bear in mind that the cervical screening programme is designed to prevent cancer. Most smears are normal, but if a smear has picked up abnormal cells it has done its job.

In the NHS, when low grade cell changes (dyskaryosis) are seen, they test for HPV and if negative, it means you’re at very low risk of developing cervical cancer before your next screening test. So you will be invited for your next cervical screening in three years’ time. You can read more about this by clicking here 

Cervical screening is very successful so as long as you go along for your appointment and follow the advice given everything should be okay.

I hope that helps. Remember you can always give us a call if you want to talk anything over. Our number is 0808 800 4040 and we are hear from 9am to 5pm Monday to Friday.

Take care,

Celene

Re: Low grade dyskaryosis

9 Feb 2018 20:04 in response to CRUK Nurse Celene
Hi, I too have a letter stating low grade and no hpv. I haven’t have sex with a man in about 17 years some I’m wondering how this has happened ? I’m very confused

Re: Low grade dyskaryosis

11 Feb 2018 15:23 in response to lorraines

Hi All, I also received a letter that i have low grade dyskaryosis and also HPV Infection, the thing that is bothering me in 2010 i had abnormal cells as well and was cleared in 2014 that my cells was normal and my other smear test will be done in 3 years, i had only had one partner from 2016 ( 2 partners all my life), so its just bothering me why it came back ,although in 2010 i wasn't told that i had HPV, why did my cells become abnormal again,does this mean in the long run there is a chance of me getting cervical cancer, as reading about HPV is said to be a sexually transmitted disease, and i had only 2 partners in my life, so please if someone can explain to me how or why did this happen. I have been given an appointment in a months time to go and do colposcopy, but i cant wait as i'm a bit worried , going to do it privately. Also would i give this infection to anyone ??

I am a smoker but have stopped smoking and started E Cigarettes.

Re: Low grade dyskaryosis

12 Feb 2018 15:05 in response to lorraines

Hello Lorraines,

Thanks for posting a question. I am sorry to learn that you have had an abnormal cervical screening (smear test) result.

Doctors know that infection with high risk strains of the human papillomavirus (HPV) causes high grade dyskaryosis (severely abnormal cells).  While low grade dyskaryosis (mildly abnormal cells) can occur with or without high risk HPV being present. When HPV is present it is usually picked up from skin to skin contact normally during sex. But you don’t have high risk HPV and so how it is picked up is not relevant to your case.  Without  HPV your abnormal cells are likely to go back to normal without any treatment.

I am afraid that I don’t know why your recent test was abnormal. But low grade dyskaryosis can occur for a number of different reasons and there is not always an obvious cause. Sometimes menopausal changes can show up as mildly abnormal cell changes. Smokers are also more likely to have an abnormal test result. Other infections, and using vaginal creams and lubricant can also cause the cells to look abnormal.

I hope that this helps.

All the best

Jean

 

Re: Low grade dyskaryosis

21 Feb 2018 09:55 in response to CRUK Nurse Jean
Good morning, My partner received results from a smear test yesterday advising that she had low grade dyskaryosis and evidence of HPV, so she is now waiting for a colposcopy appointment. I have read through this very helpful thread but I was just hoping to clarify my understanding. Am I correct in saying that cancer is not currently present from the results indicated, rather the worst case (depending on the results of colposcopy) is that there is the potential for cancer to develop in the future if untreated? Is treatment easy and reliable? Thanks in advance

Re: Low grade dyskaryosis

21 Feb 2018 15:15 in response to mwnn

Hello and thanks for your post

Low grade dyskaryosis means there is only a slight change in the cells. It doesn’t mean that your partner has cancer. But when low grade changes are seen, they test for HPV and when positive, the next step is to take a closer look at the cervix under magnification (colposcopy) . Depending on what this shows, (a biopsy may be needed as well). Abnormal cells can either be treated to prevent cancer from developing in the future or they can be monitored until they go back to normal.

Cervical screening is very successful so as long as your partner goes along for her appointments and follows the advice given then everything is likely to be okay.

I hope that helps. Feel free to give us a call if you want to talk anything over. Our number is 0808 800 4040 and we are hear from 9am to 5pm Monday to Friday.

Take care,

Celene

Re: Low grade dyskaryosis

21 Feb 2018 15:48 in response to CRUK Nurse Celene

Hi All, I also received a letter that i have low grade dyskaryosis and also HPV Infection, the thing that is bothering me in 2010 i had abnormal cells as well and was cleared in 2014 that my cells was normal and my other smear test will be done in 3 years, i had only had one partner from 2016 ( 2 partners all my life), so its just bothering me why it came back ,although in 2010 i wasn't told that i had HPV, why did my cells become abnormal again,does this mean in the long run there is a chance of me getting cervical cancer, as reading about HPV is said to be a sexually transmitted disease, and i had only 2 partners in my life, so please if someone can explain to me how or why did this happen. I have been given an appointment in a months time to go and do colposcopy, but i cant wait as i'm a bit worried , going to do it privately. Also would i give this infection to anyone ??

I am a smoker but have stopped smoking and started E Cigarettes.

Re: Low grade dyskaryosis

22 Feb 2018 07:34 in response to CRUK Nurse Celene
Dear Celene, thank you for your response, which has certainly helped to comfort me. Regards

Re: Low grade dyskaryosis

22 Feb 2018 17:06 in response to Fankaloza

Hello Frankaloza and thank you for your post.

You appear to have posted twice, so I am sorry for any delay replying to your post.

It is important to say that you are very unlikely to have cervical cancer, and as long as you attend for cervical screening you are very unlikely to develop cervical cancer.

The NHS Cervical Screening Programme (NHSCSP) is about prevention. The idea is to detect abnormal cells and then further assess them to decide whether to monitor until things go back to normal, or treat to prevent cancer from developing in the future. Not everyone with abnormal cells goes on to develop cancer. The NHSCSP follows internationally recognised guidelines and women are automatically followed up. If you attend a gynaecologist privately for an abnormal smear the examination and test results are not recorded in your NHSCSP record. There is no difference between private and NHS management of abnormal cells, and while you will be advised about follow up this is less likely to be done automatically.

It is only in the past few years that HPV testing has been introduced so it is unlikely that you were tested for HPV in 2010. It may help to explain about HPV.

The majority of high grade abnormal cell changes on the cervix detected by cervical screening are caused by HPV. Low grade changes are not always linked to HPV. It is not possible to tell what the cause of your low grade smear was in 2010.

HPV is a common infection and it is estimated that most people who are sexually active will get HPV at some stage in their lives. Most people will have no symptoms and their immune system will clear it up in a year or two without them ever knowing they had it. It is not possible to tell when a person got HPV or how long they have had it. While condoms offer some protection against HPV they are not a complete protection. Abnormal cell changes caused by HPV can go back to normal if a person’s immune system clears HPV, this is more likely if the changes are low grade.

HPV can persist (not clear) in some women and if this causes high grade abnormal changes these may develop further into cancer (over years and years). Not all women with high grade abnormal cells go on to develop cancer. But as we do not know which women are more at risk, all women with high grade changes are offered treatment. Low grade changes are usually not treated unless they persist (don’t go away) over a period of time. It is not known what causes persistent HPV but it is more common in people who smoke as this may affect their immune system. However, it is not possible to say if this is the situation in your case.

Men are thought to be less affected by HPV, your partner’s immune system may well have cleared any HPV he was exposed to. If you meet a new partner he may also be immune, and if not immune is likely to develop immunity. There is no generally available test for men.

There is more information about HPV on our website on the link here.

Colposcopy examination is done to have a closer look at the cervix and detect the area of abnormality on your cervix causing the abnormal smear. If the colposcopist finds that there is an area that may be abnormal on your cervix a biopsy is taken. This is to have a closer look at the tissue and abnormal cells. The classification system used to describe the level of abnormality is called cervical intraepithelial neoplasia  (CIN). If you have low grade changes (CIN 1) on biopsy you will be advised to have a repeat smear in a year’s time. If you have high grade changes (CIN 2 or CIN 3) you will be advised to have a colposcopy treatment to remove the small area of abnormal cells on the cervix. You can read more about the different types of treatments used here

I am sorry as I can appreciate that this is a lot of information to take in but I hope that it puts your mind at rest. If you are unsure about any of this information or have any more questions you are welcome to get back to us on the forum, or give us a call us on 0808 800 4040. We are here from Monday to Friday, 9am to 5pm.

With kind regards,

Mary