Cancer news

Latest news, press releases and blog posts from Cancer Research UK.

Drug Resistance

Cancer cells hijack healthy cells to regrow after treatment

Chemotherapy can cause some of the healthy cells surrounding a tumour to make proteins that encourage hardy tumour cells to start growing again

Blood test could predict best treatment for lung cancer

A blood test could predict how well small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) patients will respond to treatment, according to new research published in Nature Medicine.

Genetic chaos in tumours could help predict chemo response

Cancer Research UK scientists have shown how the level of genetic chaos in tumours could help predict patients’ response to chemotherapy.

Calming down immune cells could hold key to melanoma treatment

Immune cells may be responsible for drug resistance in melanoma patients, according to research published in Cancer Discovery.

Tumour DNA in blood could help monitor prostate cancer development

Analysing DNA from regular blood samples could show when a man’s prostate cancer is becoming resistant to treatment.

Queen’s University Belfast researchers’ breakthrough leads to new clinical trial in bowel cancer

Scientists have discovered how two genes cause bowel cancer cells to become resistant to treatments used against the disease.

'Liquid' lung cancer biopsies will speed up drug resistance research

Analysing cancer cells from a lung cancer patient’s blood sample could help monitor and predict their response to treatment.

Scientists find new way to combat drug resistance in skin cancer

Rapid resistance to vemurafenib - a treatment for a type of skin cancer - could be prevented by blocking a druggable family of proteins

Newcastle scientist tells Minister of new cancer hope

Understanding how prostate cancers become resistant to treatment should bring about a new breed of potent anti-cancer drugs, a leading Cancer Research UK scientist will...

Tamoxifen resistance may be reversible

Resistance to breast cancer drug tamoxifen could be reversed by adding a simple chemical to the drug, say researchers.

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