Teenagers’ and young adults’ cancers mortality statistics

Deaths

Deaths from teenagers' and young adults' cancer, 2012-2014, UK

 

Proportion of all deaths

Percentage teenagers' and young adults' cancer is of total cancer deaths, 2012-2014, UK

 

Trend over time

Teenagers' and young adults' cancers mortality rates have decreased by 58% since the early 1970s, UK

 

Proportion of UK deaths

Cancer causes only 1 in 100 of all deaths in teenagers and young adults

In 2012-2014, there was an average of 280 cancer deaths in teenagers and young adults per year in the UK: 156 (56%) in males and 124 (44%) in females, giving a male:female ratio of around 13:10.[1-3] 166 (57%) in males and 127 (43%) in females, giving a male:female ratio of 13:10. The crude mortality rate Open a glossary item shows that there are 37 cancer deaths for every million males aged 15-24 in the UK, and 31 for every million females aged 15-24.[1-3]

The European age-standardised Open a glossary item (AS) mortality rates do not differ significantly between the constituent countries of the UK for either sex.[1-3]

All Teenage and Young Adult Cancers, Average Number of Deaths per Year, Crude and European Age-Standardised (AS) Mortality Rates per Million Population, Ages 15-24, UK, 2012-2014

England Wales Scotland Northern Ireland UK
Male Deaths 130 10 10 5 156
Crude Rate 37.2 49.1 29.0 39.9 37.2
AS Rate 37.2 48.9 29.2 40.1 37.2
AS Rate - 95% LCL 33.5 31.7 18.8 19.8 33.8
AS Rate - 95% UCL 40.9 66.1 39.7 60.3 40.5
Female Deaths 101 7 11 5 124
Crude Rate 30.1 35.2 31.4 44.3 30.9
AS Rate 30.1 35.0 31.7 45.0 30.8
AS Rate - 95% LCL 26.7 20.0 20.7 22.9 27.7
AS Rate - 95% UCL 33.4 49.9 42.6 67.0 34.0
Persons Deaths 232 17 21 10 280
Crude Rate 33.7 42.3 30.2 42.1 34.1
AS Rate 33.7 42.1 30.5 42.5 34.1
AS Rate - 95% LCL 31.2 30.7 22.9 27.5 31.8
AS Rate - 95% UCL 36.2 53.6 38.1 57.5 36.4

95% LCL and 95% UCL are the 95% lower and upper confidence limits Open a glossary item around the AS Rate Open a glossary item

All teenage and young adult cancers for England, Wales and Scotland includes all malignant tumours excluding nonmelanoma
skin cancers (ICD-10 codes: C00-C97 excluding C44), and all benign/uncertain or unknown behaviour brain,
other central nervous system and intracranial tumours (ICD-10 codes: D32-D33, D35.2-D35.4, D42-D43 and D44.3-
D44.5, Northern Ireland data includes all the above codes except D33.7, D33.9, D43.7 and D43.9.

References

  1. Data are provided annually by the Office for National Statistics on request, November 2015. Similar data can be found here: https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/birthsdeathsandmarriages/deaths/bulletins/deathsregistrationsummarytables/previousReleases.
  2. Data are provided annually by Information Services Division (ISD) Scotland on request, November 2015. Similar data can be found here: http://www.nrscotland.gov.uk/statistics-and-data/statistics/statistics-by-theme/vital-events/vital-events-reference-tables.
  3. Data are provided annually by the Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency on request, November 2015. Similar data can be found here: http://www.nisra.gov.uk/demography/default.asp2.htm.
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Mortality statistics by diagnostic group according to the teenage and young adult classification scheme (see Teenage and young adult cancer incidence statistics) cannot be calculated because death registrations in the UK are generally reported in ICD-10 Open a glossary item. The data can be grouped into cancer sites using ICD-10, however, with may of the groupings being broadly the same as the diagnostic groups of the same name.

The most common causes of cancer deaths in young men are leukaemia (accounting for 20% of all male cancer deaths in this age group) and brain, other CNS and intracranial tumours (also accounting for 20% of all male cancer deaths). In young women, brain, other CNS and intracranial tumours are the most common cause of cancer deaths (accounting for 21% of all female cancer deaths in this age group) and leukaemia is the second most common cause (accounting for 17% of all female cancer deaths).[1-3] Other common causes of cancer deaths in young men and women include bone sarcoma (17% and 12%, respectively) and soft tissue sarcoma (data not shown). Although testicular cancer accounts for more than a quarter of the total cancers diagnosed in males aged 15-24 years (26% in the UK in 2008-2010),[4-7] the majority of men with this disease are cured, even if diagnosed at a late stage.[8-10] Hence, testicular cancer only accounts for 4% of all cancer deaths in males in this age group.[1-3]

Teenage and Young Adult Cancers by Cancer Type, Average Number of Deaths per Year, Ages 15-24, UK, 2009-201

All teenage and young adult cancers includes all malignant tumours (ICD-10 codes: C00-C97), and all benign, uncertain and unknown behaviour brain, other CNS and intracranial tumours (ICD-10 codes: D32-D33, D35.2-D35.4, D42-D43 and D44.3-D44.5, except for Northern Ireland for which ICD-10 codes: D32, D33.0-D33.4, D35.2-D35.4, D42, D43.0-D43.4 and D44.3-D44.5 are included).

References

  1. Data are provided annually by the Office for National Statistics on request, March 2013. Similar data can be found here: http://www.ons.gov.uk/ons/publications/all-releases.html?definition=tcm%3A77-27475.
  2. Data are provided annually by ISD Scotland on request, November 2012. Similar data can be found here: http://gro-scotland.gov.uk/statistics/theme/vital-events/general/ref-tables/index.html.
  3. Data are provided annually by the Northern Ireland Cancer Registry on request, May 2013. Similar data can be found here:http://www.nisra.gov.uk/demography/default.asp22.htm.
  4. Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency. Registrar General Annual Reports.
  5. Data were provided by the Office for National Statistics on request, June 2012. Similar data can be found here: http://www.ons.gov.uk/ons/rel/vsob1/cancer-statistics-registrations--england--series-mb1-/index.html (Accessed January 2013).
  6. Data were provided by ISD Scotland on request, April 2012. Similar data can be found here: http://www.isdscotland.org/Health-Topics/Cancer/Publications/index.asp(Accessed January 2013).
  7. Data were provided by the Welsh Cancer Intelligence and Surveillance Unit on request, April 2012. Similar data can be found here:http://www.wales.nhs.uk/sites3/page.cfm?orgid=242&pid=59080 (Accessed January 2013).
  8. Data were provided by the Northern Ireland Cancer Registry on request, October 2012. Similar data can be found here: http://www.qub.ac.uk/research-centres/nicr/CancerData/OnlineStatistics/ (Accessed January 2013).
  9. Nur U, Rachet B, Mitry E, et al. Survival from testicular cancer in England and Wales up to 2001. Br J Cancer 2008;99 Suppl 1:S80-2.
  10. Masters JR, Koberle B. Curing metastatic cancer: lessons from testicular germ-cell tumours. Nat Rev Cancer 2003;3:517-25.
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Mortality rates for cancer in teenagers and young adults have decreased by 58% in the UK since the early 1970s.[1-3] This includes a larger overall decrease for males than females.

For males aged 15-24, European age standardised (AS) mortality rates Open a glossary item decreased by 61% between 1971-1973 and 2012-2014. For females aged 15-24, rates decreased by 53% in this period.

Over the last decade in the UK (between 2003-2005 and 2012-2014), AS mortality rates for cancer in teenagers and young adults have decreased by 26% for males and females combined, with a similar decrease in males (27%) and females (25%).[1-3]

All Teenage and Young Adult Cancers, European Age-Standardised Mortality Rates per Million Population, Ages 15-24, UK, 1975-2014

For most cancer types, mortality trends largely reflect incidence and survival trends, e.g. increased incidence without sufficient survival improvement results in increased mortality.

References

  1. Data were provided by the Office for National Statistics on request, November 2015. Similar data can be found here: https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/birthsdeathsandmarriages/deaths/bulletins/deathsregistrationsummarytables/previousReleases.
  2. Data were provided by the Information Services Division (ISD) Scotland on request, November 2015. Similar data can be found here: http://www.nrscotland.gov.uk/statistics-and-data/statistics/statistics-by-theme/vital-events/vital-events-reference-tables.
  3. Data were provided by the Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency on request, November 2015. Similar data can be found here: http://www.nisra.gov.uk/demography/default.asp2.htm
Last reviewed:

Teenage and young adult males is the only age group in which cancer is not the most common cause of death overall.[1-3] Transport accidents account for the highest proportion of deaths in males (accounting for 21% of all male deaths) and the second highest in females (13%) (UK, 2009-2011).[4-6] While cancer is the fourth most common cause of death in young men aged 15-24, accounting for 9% of all male deaths, it is the most common cause of death from disease. In young women aged 15-24, cancer is the most common cause of death overall, accounting for 15% of all female deaths, and the most common cause of death from disease.

Deaths from cancer are still relatively rare in teenagers and young adults, however, with less than one per cent of the total cancer deaths occurring in this age group.

References

  1. Office for National Statistics. Mortality Statistics: Deaths registered in England and Wales (Series DR).
  2. General Register Office for Scotland. Vital Events Reference Tables.
  3. Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency. Registrar General Annual Reports.
  4. Data are provided annually by the Office for National Statistics on request, March 2013. Similar data can be found here: http://www.ons.gov.uk/ons/publications/all-releases.html?definition=tcm%3A77-27475.
  5. Data are provided annually by ISD Scotland on request, November 2012. Similar data can be found here: http://gro-scotland.gov.uk/statistics/theme/vital-events/general/ref-tables/index.html.
  6. Data are provided annually by the Northern Ireland Cancer Registry on request, May 2013. Similar data can be found here:http://www.nisra.gov.uk/demography/default.asp22.htm.
Last reviewed:

Around 27,100 deaths occurred from cancer (excluding benign, uncertain and unknown behaviour brain, other CNS and intracranial tumours) in teenagers and young adults (aged 15-39) in Europe in 2012.[1]

Around 390,000 deaths occurred from cancer (excluding benign, uncertain and unknown behaviour brain, other CNS and intracranial tumours) in teenagers and young adults (aged 15-39) worldwide in 2012.[1]

Last reviewed:

Cancer Statistics Explained

See information and explanations on terminology used for statistics and reporting of cancer, and the methods used to calculate some of our statistics.

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