Uterine cancer survival statistics

90% of women survive uterine cancer for at least one year, and this is predicted to fall to 79% surviving for five years or more, as shown by age-standardised Open a glossary item  net survival  for patients diagnosed with uterine cancer during 2010-2011 in England and Wales. [1]

Uterine Cancer (C54-C55), Age-Standardised One-, Five- and Ten-Year Net Survival, Women (Aged 15-99), England and Wales, 2010-2011

1-Year Survival (%) 5-Year Survival (%) 10-Year Survival (%)
Women Net Survival 90.3 79.0 77.5
95% LCL 90.3 79.0 77.4
95% UCL 90.3 79.0 77.6

95% LCL and 95% UCL are the 95% lower and upper confidence limits Open a glossary item

Five- and ten-year survival is predicted using an excess hazard statistical model

Uterine cancer survival falls only slightly beyond five years after diagnosis, which means most patients can be considered cured after five years. 78% of women are predicted to survive their disease for ten years or more, as shown by age-standardised net survival for patients diagnosed with uterine cancer during 2010-2011 in England and Wales.[1] Out of 20 common cancers in England and Wales, ten-year survival for uterine cancer ranks 6th highest overall (and 4th highest for females only).

Uterine Cancer (C54-C55), Net Survival up to Ten Years after Diagnosis, Women (Aged 15-99), England and Wales, 2010-2011

Survival for uterine cancer is reported in Scotland and Northern Ireland,[2,3] though it is difficult to make survival comparisons between countries due to different methodologies and criteria for including patients in analyses.

References

  1. Cancer Research UK Cancer Survival Group, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. Personal communication, 2014. 
  2. ISD Scotland. Trends in Cancer Survival 1983-2007
  3. Northern Ireland Cancer Registry. Incidence & Survival 1993-2012.
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Five-year survival for uterine cancer is highest in the youngest women and generally decreases with increasing age. Five-year net survival ranges from 88% in 15-39 year-olds to 56% in 80-99 year-olds for patients diagnosed with uterine cancer in England during 2007-2011.[1]

Uterine Cancer (C54-C55), Five-Year Net Survival by Age, England, 2007-2011

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As with most cancers, survival for uterine cancer is improving. One-year age-standardised net survival has increased from 75% during 1971-1972 to 90% during 2010-2011 in England and Wales – an absolute survival difference Open a glossary item of 15 percentage points.[1]

Uterine Cancer (C54-C55), Age-Standardised One-Year Net Survival, Women (Aged 15-99), England and Wales, 1971-2011

Five- and ten-year survival has increased by an even greater amount than one-year survival since the early 1970s. Five-year age-standardised net survival for uterine cancer has increased from 59% during 1971-1972 to a predicted survival of 79% during 2010-2011 in England and Wales – an absolute survival difference of 20 percentage points.[1]

Uterine Cancer (C54-C55), Age-Standardised Five-Year Net Survival, Women (Aged 15-99), England and Wales, 1971-2011

Five-year survival for 2010-2011 is predicted using an excess hazard statistical model

Ten-year age-standardised net survival for uterine cancer has increased from 55% during 1971-1972 to a predicted survival of 78% during 2010-2011 in England and Wales - an absolute survival difference of 22 percentage points.[1] Overall, more than three-quarters of women diagnosed with uterine cancer today are predicted to survive their disease for at least ten years.

Uterine Cancer (C54-C55), Age-Standardised Ten-Year Net Survival, Women (Aged 15-99), England and Wales, 1971-2011

Ten-year survival for 2005-2006 and 2010-2011 is predicted using an excess hazard statistical model

References

  1. Cancer Research UK Cancer Survival Group, London School of Hygiene and Tropical  Medicine. Personal communication, 2014.
Last reviewed:

Survival for uterine cancer is related to stage of the disease at diagnosis. The majority of patients are diagnosed at Stages I or II. 

One-year relative survival for uterine cancer (cancer of the body of the uterus only [C54]) is highest at Stages I and II, with 98% and 94% of patients, respectively, surviving their disease for at least one year for patients diagnosed during 2006-2010 in the former Anglia Cancer Network.[1] One-year survival is lowest for those diagnosed with Stage IV disease (35%). As very few patients are diagnosed at Stages III or IV, the one-year survival statistics have wide confidence limits and should therefore be interpreted with caution.

Cancer of the Body of the Uterus (C54), One-Year Relative Survival by Stage, Women (Aged 15-99 Years), Former Anglia Cancer Network, 2006-2010

Five-year survival for uterine cancer shows a much more rapid decrease in survival between Stages I and IV. Five-year relative survival ranges from 95% at Stage I to 14% at Stage IV for patients diagnosed during 2002-2006 in the former Anglia Cancer Network.[1]

Cancer of the Body of the Uterus (C54), Five-Year Relative Survival by Stage, Women (Aged 15-99 Years), Former Anglia Cancer Network, 2002-2006

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One-year survival rates for women in England diagnosed with uterine cancer (C54 only) in 1995-99 were significantly below the European average (88%).[1]  Five-year relative survival was also lower (75%) but not significantly lower than the European average. Women in the United States diagnosed with uterine cancer (C54 only) in 1995-2001 had five-year survival of 85%.[2]

In the United States there are significant differences in survival between African American and white women.[2] While this could partly be due to differences in treatment between the two groups, African American women are significantly more likely to get high-grade tumours and to present at a later stage.[3]

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For women diagnosed in 1996-1999 there is a significant gap in five-year survival between the most deprived and least deprived women of 4.5%.[1] Regional differences in survival rates reflect this deprivation gradient. Wales had the lowest relative one and five-year survival rates for women diagnosed in 1986-90, while the South and West regions in England had the highest rates.[2]

References

  1. Coleman MP, Rachet B, Woods LM, et al. Trends in socioeconomic inequalities in cancer survival in England and Wales up to 2001. BJC 2004;90(7):1367-73. 
  2. Coleman MP, Babb P, Damiecki P, et al. Cancer Survival Trends in England and Wales, 1971-1995: Deprivation and NHS Region. Series SMPS No 61. London: ONS; 1999.
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