Thyroid cancer survival statistics

Survival

Survive thyroid cancer for 10 or more years, 2009-2013, England

 

90% of men survive thyroid cancer for at least one year, and this is predicted to fall to 82% surviving for five years or more, as shown by age-standardised Open a glossary item net survival for patients diagnosed with thyroid cancer during 2009-2013 in England.[1] Survival for women is higher, with 94% surviving for one year or more, and 91% predicted to survive for at least five years.

Thyroid Cancer (C73), Age-Standardised One-, Five- and Ten-Year Net Survival, Adults (Aged 15-90), England, 2009-2013

1-Year Survival (%) 5-Year Survival (%) 10-Year Survival (%)
Men Net Survival 90.0 82.3 75.3
95% LCL 88.8 80.4 66.8
95% UCL 91.0 84.1 82.0
Women Net Survival 93.9 91.3 88.5
95% LCL 93.3 90.4 86.8
95% UCL 94.4 92.1 89.9
Adults Net Survival 92.8 88.9 85.0
95% LCL 92.3 88.1 82.4
95% UCL 93.3 89.6 87.2

95% LCL and 95% UCL are the 95% lower and upper confidence limits Open a glossary item
 
Five- and ten-year survival is predicted using an excess hazard statistical model
 

In men, thyroid cancer survival is similar at five and ten years after diagnosis. In women, thyroid cancer continues to fall beyond five years. 75% of men and 89% of women are predicted to survive their disease for ten years or more, as shown by age-standardised net survival for patients diagnosed with thyroid cancer during 2009-2013 in England.[1]

Survival for thyroid cancer is reported in Scotland and Wales,[2,3] though it is difficult to make survival comparisons between countries due to different methodologies and criteria for including patients in analyses.

References

  1. Muller P, Belot A, Morris M, Rachet B, Cancer Research UK Cancer Survival Group, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. Net survival and the probability of cancer death from rare cancers. Available from http://csg.lshtm.ac.uk/rare-cancers/. Accessed July 2016.
  2. ISD Scotland. Trends in Cancer Survival 1983-2007.
  3. Welsh Cancer Intelligence and Surveillance Unit. Cancer in Wales: 2001-2004.
Last reviewed:

Five-year survival for thyroid cancer is highest in the youngest men and women and decreases with increasing age. Five-year net survival in men ranges from 96% in 15-49 year olds to 40% in 80-99 year-olds for patients diagnosed with thyroid cancer in England during 2009-2013.[1] In women, five-year survival ranges from 99% to 51% in the same age groups.

Thyroid Cancer (C73), Five-Year Net Survival by Age, England, 2009-2013

References

  1. Muller P, Belot A, Morris M, Rachet B, Cancer Research UK Cancer Survival Group, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. Net survival and the probability of cancer death from rare cancers. Available from http://csg.lshtm.ac.uk/rare-cancers/. Accessed July 2016.
Last reviewed:

Cancer Statistics Explained

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