Acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) mortality statistics

Deaths

Deaths from acute myeloid leukaemia, 2014, UK

 

Proportion of all deaths

Percentage acute myeloid leukaemia is of total cancer deaths, 2014, UK

 

Age

Peak rate of acute myeloid leukaemia deaths, 2012-2014, UK

 

Trend over time

Acute myeloid leukaemia mortality rates have increased by 84% since the early 1970s, UK

 

Acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) accounts for 2% of all cancer deaths in the UK (2014) accounting for 2% of all male cancer deaths, and 1% of all female cancer deaths.[1-3]

In 2014, there were 2,516 AML deaths in the UK: 1,453 (58%) in males and 1,063 (42%) in females, giving a male:female ratio of around 14:10.[1-3] The crude mortality rate shows that there are 5 AML deaths for every 100,000 males in the UK, and 3 for every 100,000 females.

The European age-standardised mortality rates (AS rates) do not differ significantly between the constituent countries of the UK for either sex.[1-3]

Acute Myeloid Leukaemia (C920, C924, C925, C926, C928, C930, C940, C942), Number of Deaths, Crude and European Age-Standardised (AS) Mortality Rates per 100,000 Population, UK, 2014

England Wales Scotland Northern Ireland UK
Male Deaths 1,225 79 109 40 1,453
Crude Rate 4.6 5.2 4.2 4.4 4.6
AS Rate 5.6 5.9 5.0 6.3 5.6
AS Rate - 95% LCL 5.3 4.6 4.0 4.4 5.3
AS Rate - 95% UCL 6.0 7.3 5.9 8.3 5.9
Female Deaths 902 51 85 25 1,063
Crude Rate 3.3 3.2 3.1 2.7 3.2
AS Rate 3.3 3.1 3.0 3.0 3.3
AS Rate - 95% LCL 3.1 2.2 2.4 1.8 3.1
AS Rate - 95% UCL 3.5 3.9 3.7 4.1 3.5
Persons Deaths 2,127 130 194 65 2,516
Crude Rate 3.9 4.2 3.6 3.5 3.9
AS Rate 4.3 4.2 3.9 4.4 4.3
AS Rate - 95% LCL 4.1 3.5 3.4 3.3 4.1
AS Rate - 95% UCL 4.5 5.0 4.5 5.4 4.4

95% LCL and 95% UCL are the 95% lower and upper confidence limits Open a glossary item around the AS rate

References

  1. Data were provided by the Office for National Statistics on request, November 2015. Similar data can be found here: https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/birthsdeathsandmarriages/deaths/bulletins/deathsregistrationsummarytables/previousReleases.
  2. Data were provided by Information Services Division (ISD) Scotland on request, November 2015. Similar data can be found here: http://www.nrscotland.gov.uk/statistics-and-data/statistics/statistics-by-theme/vital-events/vital-events-reference-tables.
  3. Data were provided by the Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency on request, November 2015. Similar data can be found here: http://www.nisra.gov.uk/demography/default.asp2.htm.
Last reviewed:

Acute myeloid leukaemia mortality (AML) is strongly related to age, with the highest mortality rates being in older males and females. In the UK in 2012-2014, on average each year around half (51%) of deaths were in people aged 75 and over.[1-3]

Age-specific mortality rates rise gradually from around age 50-54 and more steeply from around age 60-64, with the highest rates in the 85-89 age group. Mortality rates are significantly higher for males than for females at ages 50-54 and 60-64 and over and this gap is widest at the ages of 80-84, when the male:female ratio of age-specific rates (to account for the different proportions of males to females in each age group) is around 20:10.[1-3]

Acute Myeloid Leukaemia (C92.0, C92.4, C92.5, C92.6, C92.8, C93.0, C94.0, C94.2), Average Number of Deaths per Year and Age-Specific Mortality Rates, UK, 2012-2014

For most cancer types, mortality by age largely reflects incidence and survival by age, e.g. typically, higher incidence and lower survival in older people results in higher mortality in older people.

References

  1. Data were provided by the Office for National Statistics on request, November 2015. Similar data can be found here: https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/birthsdeathsandmarriages/deaths/bulletins/deathsregistrationsummarytables/previousReleases.
  2. Data were provided by the Information Services Division (ISD) Scotland on request, November 2015. Similar data can be found here: http://www.nrscotland.gov.uk/statistics-and-data/statistics/statistics-by-theme/vital-events/vital-events-reference-tables.
  3. Data were provided by the Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency on request, November 2015.Similar data can be found here: http://www.nisra.gov.uk/demography/default.asp2.htm.
Last reviewed:

Acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) mortality rates have increased by 84% in the UK since the early 1970s.[1-3] This includes a larger overall increase for males than females.

For males, European age-standardised Open a glossary item (AS) mortality rates increased by 99% between 1971-1973 and 2012-2014. For females, rates increased by 60% in this period.

Over the last decade in the UK (between 2003-2005 and 2012-2014), AML AS mortality rates have increased by 8% for males and females combined, though this includes an increase in males (11%) and stable rates in females.[1-3]

Acute Myeloid Leukaemia (C92.0, C92.4, C92.5, C92.6, C92.8, C93.0, C94.0, C94.2), European Age-Standardised Mortality Rates, UK, 1971-2014

For most cancer types, mortality trends largely reflect incidence and survival trends, e.g. increased incidence without sufficient survival improvement results in increased mortality.

AML mortality rates have increased in people aged 60-69 and over in the UK since the early 1970s, but have decreased in people aged 25-49 and under and have remained stable in people aged 50-59.[1-3] The largest increase has been in people aged 80+, with rates increasing by 230% between 1971-1973 and 2012-2014. The largest decrease has been in people aged 0-24, with rates decreasing by 63% between 1971-1973 and 2012-2014.

Acute Myeloid Leukaemia (C92.0, C92.4, C92.5, C92.6, C92.8, C93.0, C94.0, C94.2), European Age-Standardised Mortality Rates, by Age, Persons, UK, 1971-2014

References

  1. Data were provided by the Office for National Statistics on request, November 2015. Similar data can be found here: https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/birthsdeathsandmarriages/deaths/bulletins/deathsregistrationsummarytables/previousReleases.
  2. Data were provided by the Information Services Division (ISD) Scotland on request, November 2015. Similar data can be found here: http://www.nrscotland.gov.uk/statistics-and-data/statistics/statistics-by-theme/vital-events/vital-events-reference-tables.
  3. Data were provided by the Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency on request, November 2015. Similar data can be found here: http://www.nisra.gov.uk/demography/default.asp2.htm.
Last reviewed:

There is no evidence for an association between acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) mortality and deprivation for either males or females in England.[1] England-wide data for 2007-2011 show European age-standardised Open a glossary item mortality rates are similar for both males and females living in the most deprived areas compared with the least deprived.[1]

Acute Myeloid Leukaemia (C92.0,C92.4,C92.5,C93.0,C94.0,C94.2), European Age-Standardised Mortality Rates by Deprivation Quintile, England, 2007-2011

The estimated deprivation gradient in AML mortality between people living in the most and least deprived areas in England has not changed in the period 2002-2011.[1]

Last reviewed:

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