In situ breast carcinoma incidence statistics

In 2012, there were 6,399 new cases of in situ breast carcinoma in the UK: 6,381 (99.7%) in women and 18 (0.43%) in men, giving a female:male ratio of around 355:1.[1-4] The crude incidence rate shows that there are 20 new in situ breast carcinoma cancer cases for every 100,000 females in the UK, and 0.1 for every 100,000 males.

The European age-standardised incidence rate (AS rate) Open a glossary item of in situ breast carcinoma in females is significantly higher in England than in Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland.[1-4] There are no other significant differences between the constituent countries of the UK.

In Situ Breast Carcinoma (D05), Number of New Cases, Crude and European Age-Standardised (AS) Incidence Rates per 100,000 Population, UK, 2012

    England Scotland Wales Northern Ireland UK
Male Cases 17 1     18
Crude Rate 0.1 0.0     0.1
AS Rate 0.1 0.1     0.1
AS Rate - 95% LCL 0.0 0.0     0.0
AS Rate - 95% UCL 0.1 0.2     0.1
Female Cases 5,500 286 468 127 6381
Crude Rate 20.3 18.3 17.1 13.7 19.7
AS Rate 21.6 18.3 17.1 15.5 20.8
AS Rate - 95% LCL 21.0 16.2 15.6 12.8 20.3
AS Rate - 95% UCL 22.1 20.5 18.7 18.2 21.4

95% LCL and 95% UCL are the 95% lower and upper confidence limits around the AS Rate Open a glossary item

ASR calculated with ESP2013. Not comparable with ASRs calculated with ESP1976.

References

  1. Data were provided by the Office for National Statistics on request, July 2014. Similar data can be found here: http://www.ons.gov.uk/ons/rel/vsob1/cancer-statistics-registrations--england--series-mb1-/index.html.
  2. Data were provided by ISD Scotland on request, April 2014. Similar data can be found here: http://www.isdscotland.org/Health-Topics/Cancer/Publications/index.asp.  
  3. Data were provided by the Welsh Cancer Intelligence and Surveillance Unit on request, April 2014. Similar data can be found here: http://www.wales.nhs.uk/sites3/page.cfm?orgid=242&pid=59080.
  4. Data were provided by the Northern Ireland Cancer Registry on request, June 2014. Similar data can be found here: http://www.qub.ac.uk/research-centres/nicr/.
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In situ breast carcinoma incidence is related to age, with the highest incidence rates being in women in their 50s and 60s. In the UK between 2010 and 2012, an average of 67% of cases were diagnosed in women aged between 50-54 and 65-69.[1-4] Screening is a major driver behind the pattern of in situ breast carcinoma diagnoses.[5,6] In the UK women aged 50-70 are invited for screening every three years, and women aged over 70 can request an appointment. In England, this age range is currently being extended to include women aged 47-49 and 71-73 and full roll-out is expected to be completed after 2016.[8

The remainder of cases are split almost evenly between women either side of the screening age group, with 17% of cases diagnosed in women aged 49 and younger, and 16% in women aged 70 and older. Age-specific incidence rates rise steeply from around age 30-34, peak at age 50-54, drop slightly at age 55-59 before a second peak at 65-69, then decrease steeply until 75-79 and more steadily thereafter.[1-4]

A study of in situ breast carcinoma in England during 2006-2007 showed that more than 60% of cases are screen-detected; the remainder of cases are diagnosed outside of the screening programme (possibly as a result of routine diagnostic radiology for other medical purposes).[6]

In Situ Breast Carcinoma (D05), Average Number of New Cases per Year and Age-Specific Incidence Rates, Females, UK, 2010-2012

ASR calculated with ESP2013. Not comparable with ASRs calculated with ESP1976.

References

  1. Data were provided by the Office for National Statistics on request, July 2014. Similar data can be found here: http://www.ons.gov.uk/ons/rel/vsob1/cancer-statistics-registrations--england--series-mb1-/index.html.  
  2. Data were provided by ISD Scotland on request, April 2014. Similar data can be found here: http://www.isdscotland.org/Health-Topics/Cancer/Publications/index.asp.  
  3. Data were provided by the Welsh Cancer Intelligence and Surveillance Unit on request, April 2014. Similar data can be found here: http://www.wales.nhs.uk/sites3/page.cfm?orgid=242&pid=59080.  
  4. Data were provided by the Northern Ireland Cancer Registry on request, June 2014. Similar data can be found here: http://www.qub.ac.uk/research-centres/nicr/
  5. Glover JA, Bannon FJ, Hughes CM, et al. Increased diagnosis and detection rates of carcinoma in situ of the breast. Breast Cancer Res Treat. 2012;133(2):779-84.
  6. West Midlands Cancer Intelligence Unit. The Non-Invasive Breast Cancer report: An analysis of non-invasive breast cancers diagnosed in England from 1 January 2006 to 31 December 2007. National Cancer Intelligence Unit, 2011. 
  7. UK National Screening Committee. UK Screening Portal: Breast screening across the UK. Accessed October 2012.
  8. NHS Breast Cancer Screening Programme. Age Extension Full Randomised Control Trial. Acessed December 2013
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In situ breast carcinoma incidence rates have overall increased almost six-fold (490% increase) in Great Britain since the late 1970s.[1-3] The largest increases have been observed since the national screening programmes were introduced in the UK in the late 1980s. In the first decade of screening, European age standardised Open a glossary item (AS) incidence rates increased by almost two-and-a-half times (142% increase between 1988-1990 and 1997-1999) as a prevalent pool of undiagnosed carcinomas were detected in the population. Since then, rates have increased by around three quarters (74% increase between 1997-1999 and 2010-2012).[1-3]

In Situ Breast Carcinoma (D05), European Age-Standardised Incidence Rates, Females, Great Britain, 1979 -2012

ASR calculated with ESP2013. Not comparable with ASRs calculated with ESP1976.

Over the last decade (between 2001-2003 and 2010-2012), the European age standardised (AS) incidence rate has increased by 39%.[1-4]

In Situ Breast Carcinoma (D05), European Age-Standardised Incidence Rates, Females, UK, 1993-2012

ASR calculated with ESP2013. Not comparable with ASRs calculated with ESP1976.

In situ breast carcinoma incidence rates have overall increased for all broad age groups in Great Britain since the late 1970s.[1-3] The largest increases have been in women of screening age, with European AS incidence rates increasing more than nine-fold in women aged 50-64 (841% increase), and more than 11-fold in those aged 65-69 (1007% increase), between 1979-1981 and 2010-2012. These increases were steepest in the late 1980s and early 1990s for women aged 50-64, and in the early 2000s for women aged 65-69; this corresponds with the start of the screening programmes for 50-64 year olds in the late 1980s, and then the extension to include women aged 65-69 from 2001 onwards.[1-3] Improvements in screening methods (such as the introduction of two-view mammography), better population coverage and improved screening uptake rates will also have contributed to increases in incidence rates for these age groups.[5] The option for women aged over 70 to request screening appointments will partly explain the increasing incidence rates in this age group.[5]

In Situ Breast Carcinoma (D05), European Age-Standardised Incidence Rates, Females, by Age, Great Britain, 1979-2012

ASR calculated with ESP2013. Not comparable with ASRs calculated with ESP1976.

References

  1. Data were provided by the Office for National Statistics on request, July 2014. Similar data can be found here: http://www.ons.gov.uk/ons/rel/vsob1/cancer-statistics-registrations--england--series-mb1-/index.html.  
  2. Data were provided by ISD Scotland on request, April 2014. Similar data can be found here: http://www.isdscotland.org/Health-Topics/Cancer/Publications/index.asp.  
  3. Data were provided by the Welsh Cancer Intelligence and Surveillance Unit on request, April 2014. Similar data can be found here: http://www.wales.nhs.uk/sites3/page.cfm?orgid=242&pid=59080.  
  4. 4.    Data were provided by the Northern Ireland Cancer Registry on request, June 2014. Similar data can be found here: http://www.qub.ac.uk/research-centres/nicr/.
  5. Glover JA, Bannon FJ, Hughes CM, et al. Increased diagnosis and detection rates of carcinoma in situ of the breast. Breast Cancer Res Treat. 2012;133(2):779-84. 
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Most in situ breast carcinoma cases are intraductal, and there is a much smaller proportion of lobular in situ breast carcinomas (2010-2012).[1-4]

A small proportion of cases did not have the specific part of the breast recorded in cancer registry data.[1-4]

In Situ Breast Carcinoma (D05), Percentage Distribution of Cases Diagnosed By Anatomical Site, Females, UK, 2010-2012

Cancer site (ICD-10 code) Average Cases %
Lobular (D05.0) 558 9.3%
Intraductal (D05.1) 5,077 84.5%
Breast, Other and Unspecified (D05.7-D05.9) 373 6.2%
Total 6,008 100.0%

Cases and percentages may not sum due to rounding

References

  1. Data were provided by the Office for National Statistics on request, July 2014. Similar data can be found here: http://www.ons.gov.uk/ons/rel/vsob1/cancer-statistics-registrations--england--series-mb1-/index.html.
  2. Data were provided by ISD Scotland on request, April 2014. Similar data can be found here: http://www.isdscotland.org/Health-Topics/Cancer/Publications/index.asp.
  3. Data were provided by the Welsh Cancer Intelligence and Surveillance Unit on request, April 2014. Similar data can be found here: http://www.wales.nhs.uk/sites3/page.cfm?orgid=242&pid=59080.
  4. Data were provided by the Northern Ireland Cancer Registry on request, June 2014. Similar data can be found here: http://www.qub.ac.uk/research-centres/nicr/CancerInformation/.
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A quarter of women diagnosed with in situ breast carcinoma in England during 2006-2007 live in the least deprived areas of England, while only 13% live in the most deprived areas.[1] A similar distribution of cases by deprivation is also reported for invasive breast cancer.[1]

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The proportion of incidence cases in White females with in situ breast carcinoma is significantly higher than for Asian or Black females.[1]

A similar ethnic profile is also reported for invasive breast cancer.[2]

Analysis included unknown data. For in situ breast carcinoma, 5,460 cases were identified; 28% had no known ethnicity.

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