Children's cancers mortality statistics

Deaths

Deaths from children's cancer, 2012-2014, UK

 

Proportion of all deaths

Percentage children's cancer is of total cancer deaths, 2012-2014, UK

 

Trend over time

Children's cancers mortality rates have decreased by 66% since the early 1970s, UK

 

Proportion of UK deaths

Cancer causes around a fifth of all deaths in children, 2010-2012, UK

In 2012-2014, there was an average of 257 cancer deaths in children per year in the UK: 139 (54%) in boys and 118 (46%) in girls, giving a male:female ratio of around 12:10.[1-3] The crude mortality rate Open a glossary item shows that there are 24 cancer deaths for every million boys aged 0-14 in the UK, and 21 for every million girls aged 0-14.[1-3]

The World age standardised (AS) Open a glossary item mortality rates do not differ significantly between the constituent countries of the UK for either sex.[1-3]

All Childhood Cancers, Average Number of Deaths per Year, Crude and World Age-Standardised (AS) Mortality Rates per Million Population, Ages 0-14, UK, 2012-2014

England Wales Scotland Northern Ireland UK
Boys Deaths 117 4 11 6 139
Crude Rate 23.9 15.0 26.0 34.5 24.0
AS Rate 24.0 14.6 26.9 34.1 24.1
AS Rate - 95% LCL* 21.5 6.3 17.9 18.8 21.8
AS Rate - 95% UCL* 26.5 22.9 35.9 49.4 26.4
Girls Deaths 104 4 7 3 118
Crude Rate 22.2 14.5 17.6 17.2 21.3
AS Rate 22.2 14.3 18.0 17.7 21.4
AS Rate - 95% LCL* 19.7 5.9 10.4 6.1 19.1
AS Rate - 95% UCL* 24.7 22.8 25.5 29.2 23.6
Children Deaths 221 8 19 9 257
Crude Rate 23.1 14.8 21.9 26.0 22.7
AS Rate 23.1 14.5 22.5 26.1 22.8
AS Rate - 95% LCL* 21.3 8.6 16.6 16.4 21.1
AS Rate - 95% UCL* 24.9 20.4 28.4 35.8 24.4

95% LCL and 95% UCL are the 95% lower and upper confidence limits Open a glossary item around the age-standardised rate Open a glossary item

References

  1. Data were provided by the Office for National Statistics on request, November 2015. Similar data can be found here: https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/birthsdeathsandmarriages/deaths/bulletins/deathsregistrationsummarytables/previousReleases.
  2. Data were provided by the Information Services Division (ISD) Scotland on request, November 2015. Similar data can be found here: http://www.nrscotland.gov.uk/statistics-and-data/statistics/statistics-by-theme/vital-events/vital-events-reference-tables.
  3. Data were provided by the Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency on request, November 2015. Similar data can be found here: http://www.nisra.gov.uk/demography/default.asp2.htm.
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The three most common causes of cancer deaths in children are brain, other central nervous system (CNS) and intracranial tumours, leukaemia, and sympathetic nervous system tumours.[1] Although brain, other CNS and intracranial tumours rank second in incidence, they are the most common cause of deaths from cancer in childhood, accounting for around a third of all cancer deaths in boys and girls.

Childhood Cancers by Cancer Type, Average Number of Deaths per Year, Ages 0-14, Great Britain, 1996-2005

References

  1. Data were provided by the Childhood Cancer Research Group on request, March 2013. Similar data can be found here: http://www.ccrg.ox.ac.uk/.
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Mortality rates for cancer in children have decreased by 66% in the UK since the early 1970s.[1-3] This includes a similar decrease for boys and girls.

For boys aged 0-14, European age-standardised Open a glossary item (AS) mortality rates decreased by 68% between 1971-1973 and 2012-2014. For girls aged 0-14, rates decreased by 63% in this period.

Over the last decade in the UK (between 2003-2005 and 2012-2014), AS mortality rates for cancer in children have decreased by 18% for boys and girls combined, however this includes a decrease in boys (20%) and stable rates in girls.[1-3]

All Childhood Cancers, World Age-Standardised Mortality Rates per Million Population, Ages 0-14, UK, 1971-2014

For most cancer types, mortality trends largely reflect incidence and survival trends, e.g. increased incidence without sufficient survival improvement results in increased mortality.

References

  1. Data were provided by the Office for National Statistics on request, November 2015. Similar data can be found here: https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/birthsdeathsandmarriages/deaths/bulletins/deathsregistrationsummarytables/previousReleases.
  2. Data were provided by the Information Services Division (ISD) Scotland on request, November 2015. Similar data can be found here: http://www.nrscotland.gov.uk/statistics-and-data/statistics/statistics-by-theme/vital-events/vital-events-reference-tables.
  3. Data were provided by the Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency on request, November 2015. Similar data can be found here: http://www.nisra.gov.uk/demography/default.asp2.htm.
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Around 3,317 deaths occurred from cancer (excluding benign, uncertain and unknown behaviour brain, other CNS and intracranial tumours) in children in Europe in 2012.[1]

Around 79,953 deaths occurred from cancer (excluding benign, uncertain and unknown behaviour brain, other CNS and intracranial tumours) in children worldwide in 2012.[1]

Last reviewed:

Cancer (excluding benign, uncertain and unknown behaviour brain, other CNS and intracranial tumours) is the most common cause of death in children and accounts for around a fifth of all deaths in boys and girls aged 1-14 (19% and 20%, respectively).[1-3] Despite this, deaths from cancer are still relatively rare in children aged 0-14 years, with less than one per cent of the total cancer deaths occurring in this age group.[4-6]

References

  1. Office for National Statistics. Mortality Statistics: Deaths registered in England and Wales (Series DR).
  2. General Register Office for Scotland. Vital Events Reference Tables.
  3. Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency. Registrar General Annual Reports.
  4. Data were provided by the Office for National Statistics on request, March 2013. Similar data can be found here: http://www.ons.gov.uk/ons/publications/all-releases.html?definition=tcm%3A77-27475.
  5. Data were provided by ISD Scotland on request, November 2012. Similar data can be found here: http://gro-scotland.gov.uk/statistics/theme/vital-events/general/ref-tables/index.html.
  6. Data were provided by the Northern Ireland Cancer Registry on request, May 2013. Similar data can be found here:http://www.nisra.gov.uk/demography/default.asp22.htm.
Last reviewed:

Cancer Statistics Explained

See information and explanations on terminology used for statistics and reporting of cancer, and the methods used to calculate some of our statistics.

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