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Further tests for pancreatic cancer

Men and women discussing pancreatic cancer

This page is about further tests for pancreatic cancer. You can find the following information

 

A quick guide to what's on this page

Further tests for pancreatic cancer

If tests show you have pancreatic cancer, you may have further tests to see if the cancer has spread. These may include a liver ultrasound, abdominal CT scan, MRI scan, chest X-ray, endoluminal ultrasound (EUS), laparoscopy and laparoscopic ultrasound. The tests can show whether it is possible to completely remove your cancer or not.

You may have had some or all of these tests already when your doctor was diagnosing your cancer. You may be in hospital while you are having all your tests and your doctor may give you the diagnosis at the same time. Or you may have your tests as an outpatient and be asked to return to the hospital when your test results have come through.

You are likely to feel very anxious while you are waiting for results. It may help to talk to a close friend or relative about how you are feeling. Or you may want to contact a cancer support group to talk to someone who has been through a similar experience.

 

CR PDF Icon You can view and print the quick guides for all the pages in the diagnosing pancreatic cancer section.

 

Why you might need more tests

If your tests show you have pancreatic cancer, you may have further tests to see if the cancer has spread. This helps your doctor to decide on the best treatment. The tests can show whether it is possible to completely remove your cancer or not.

 

Tests you may have

There are a number of tests you may have. The links below will take you to other pages of the website which describe these tests

You may have had some or all of these tests already when your doctor was diagnosing your cancer. The CT, ultrasound and MRI scans can show whether the cancer has spread to the liver. The chest X-ray can show if there is spread to the lungs.

 

After the tests

You may be in hospital while you are having all your tests and be given the diagnosis at the same time. Or you may have your tests as an outpatient and be asked to go back to the hospital when your test results have come through. 

You are likely to feel very anxious while you are waiting for results. It may help to talk to a close friend or relative about how you are feeling. Or you may want to contact a cancer support group to talk to someone who has been through a similar experience.

Look at our useful organisations page for an organisation that can give you information about support groups. Or about counselling services near you.

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Updated: 10 December 2012