Cancer Research UK on Google+ Cancer Research UK on Facebook Cancer Research UK on Twitter

Breast cancer follow up

Men and women discussing breast cancer

This page tells you about outpatient appointments after treatment for breast cancer.

 

A quick guide to what's on this page

Breast cancer follow up

After treatment for breast cancer you will have regular check ups and mammograms. These may continue for several years. At the appointments your doctor or breast care nurse will ask how you are getting over your treatment. They will also check your other breast, ask you how you are feeling, and check out any new symptoms, if you have them.

You can contact a breast care nurse between appointments if you need to. Your breast care nurse is a source of support and advice and can arrange extra appointments at the breast clinic if you are worried about anything. Let your doctor or breast care nurse know as soon as possible if you have any problems. Tell them if you notice any new symptoms between check ups.

What happens during check ups?

Your doctor will examine you and ask how you are feeling. This is your chance to ask about anything that has been worrying you. You may have blood tests from time to time. You may have occasional X-rays. But mostly, your doctor will not order any tests unless you have a symptom, or something in particular is bothering you.

If you have had early breast cancer or DCIS, you have routine mammograms once a year for 5 years. If your cancer was discovered through the NHS breast screening programme you will have yearly mammograms and then go back to the screening programme.

 

CR PDF Icon You can view and print the quick guides for all the pages in the Treating breast cancer section.

 

 

Why you need check ups

After your treatment you have regular check ups for at least 5 years. You have yearly mammograms for at least 5 years. How long you need regular appointments will vary depending on your hospital or clinic. The appointments may continue for up to 10 years, particularly if you have taken part in a clinical trial.

Your doctor or breast cancer nurse will use the check ups to

  • See how you are getting over your treatment
  • Discuss further treatment
  • Discuss any side effects you may have
  • Ask you if you are worried about anything
  • Check your other breast
  • Check out any new symptoms, if you have any

The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) guidelines say that everyone who has had treatment for early breast cancer should have a copy of a written care plan. 

The care plan has information about tests, signs and symptoms to look out for, and contact details for specialist staff, such as your breast care nurse. The breast care nurse is a source of support and advice and you can contact them between appointments if you are worried about anything. They can arrange extra appointments at the breast clinic for you. The care plan should also include contact details for support services who can help with problems such as lymphoedema.

 

What happens at check up appointments

Your doctor or breast care nurse will examine you and ask how you have been feeling. You can ask them about anything that has been worrying you. You may have blood tests from time to time. You may have occasional X-rays. But mostly, your doctor will not order any tests apart from yearly mammograms unless any of the following occur.

  • You have a symptom
  • Something in particular is bothering you
  • Any of your tests are abnormal

Research has shown that having regular physical check ups and mammograms works as well as more intense follow up, such as scans, X-rays and blood tests. Let your doctor or breast care nurse know as soon as possible if you have any problems. Tell them if you notice any new symptoms between check ups.

 

Mammograms

If you have had early breast cancer or DCIS, you should have routine mammograms to the treated breast (if you have not had a mastectomy) and to your other breast. 

The 2009 NICE guidelines recommend that you should have a mammogram once a year for 5 years, or until you start to have mammograms as part of the breast screening programme, whichever is longer. You would usually join the screening programme after you reach your 47th birthday. On the screening programme, women have a mammogram every 3 years.

If your cancer was found by the screening programme you have yearly mammograms for 5 years and then go back to the screening programme.

 

More information about breast cancer

You can keep in touch about treatments and other aspects of breast cancer. Look at the breast cancer reading list and other sections, including

You can contact the Cancer Research UK information nurses for information about follow up. Some breast cancer organisations give information about treatment and follow up checks. They can also put you in touch with cancer support groups where you can talk to people who have been through similar experiences to your own. Many people find counselling very helpful after cancer treatment. To find out more about counselling, look at the counselling section.

 

Keeping in touch

Once your treatment has finished it can be a scary and isolating time. You may still want support from other people. You may also have practical ideas and experiences of your own that you'd like to share with other women. 

You can use our tips and stories section to share your experience of treatments, follow up, check ups, and other topics about breast cancer. You can read about other people's experiences in your stories too.

Rate this page:
Submit rating

 

Rated 4 out of 5 based on 10 votes
Rate this page
Rate this page for no comments box
Please enter feedback to continue submitting
Send feedback
Question about cancer? Contact our information nurse team

No Error

Updated: 24 October 2012