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A trial looking at the role of diet, complementary treatment and lifestyle factors in breast cancer survival (DietCompLyf)

This trial was set up to see if diet, complementary therapies and lifestyle factors have an effect on breast cancer survival.

Some researchers believe that a group of chemicals found in plants, called phytoestrogens may affect breast cancer. Phytoestrogens are similar in structure to a hormone called oestrogen. The evidence about the affect of phytoestrogens on breast cancer varies. The research team hoped to find out more about whether phytoestrogens really affect whether breast cancer comes back (recurrence) or survival.

Some researchers also think that having a healthy lifestyle and using complementary therapies may help improve survival in people with breast cancer. But when this trial started there was little scientific evidence to support this.

This trial looked at the diet and lifestyle of over 3,000 women with breast cancer. The aims of the trial were to find out if phytoestrogens, lifestyle factors and using supplements affect whether breast cancer comes back after treatment and how long people live for.

Recruitment

Start 01/01/2001
End 31/05/2010

Phase

Other

Summary of results

The researchers found that women often changed their diet after being diagnosed with breast cancer. They also found that the level of phytoestrogens in the diet did not affect factors associated with how well you are likely to do after treatment for breast cancer (your prognosis).

The trial recruited over 3,000 women who had been diagnosed with breast cancer. They filled out questionnaires which asked them about their diet and lifestyle before and after they were diagnosed with cancer. This included questions about portion sizes, cooking habits, which foods they ate most often and any supplements they took.

In 2011, the research team looked at the information for 1,560 women. These women filled in another questionnaire about a year after they were diagnosed. The research team compared this to what the women ate before they were diagnosed and found they ate

  • 173 fewer calories each day
  • More whole grains, fruit, vegetables and lean protein
  • Less sugar, fat, red meat and refined grains

The trial team continue to follow up the people taking part in this trial. But their initial conclusions were that women with breast cancer significantly changed their dietary habits after their diagnosis.

In 2013, the research team looked at phytoestrogen intake in 1,797 women to see whether this affected the factors associated with how well the women were likely to do after treatment (their prognosis). The trial team found no evidence that the level of phytoestrogens affected prognosis. However there were some links between phytoestrogens eaten before diagnosis and certain risk factors for breast cancer, such as body weight and having children.

The research team continue to look at if and when cancer comes back in the women in this trial. They are looking at whether diet, and phytoestrogens in particular, affect how long women with breast cancer live for. We will update this page when this information is available.

We have based this summary on information from the team who ran the trial. The information they sent us has been reviewed by independent specialists (peer reviewed) and published in a medical journal. The figures we quote above were provided by the trial team. We have not analysed the data ourselves.

Chief Investigator

Miriam Dwek

Supported by

Against Breast Cancer
Experimental Cancer Medicine Centre (ECMC)
National Institute for Health Research Cancer Research Network (NCRN)
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Updated: 19 November 2013