Cancer news

Latest news, press releases and blog posts from Cancer Research UK.

Oesophageal Cancer

The biggest cancer science stories of 2015

We've enlisted the help of one of our researchers to pick out the biggest cancer research stories of 2015.

World’s largest clinical trial on aspirin to stop cancer returning launches today

The world’s largest ever clinical trial looking at whether taking aspirin stops some of the most common cancers coming back, launches across the UK today.

How we’re building a community to beat oesophageal cancer

“I am the face behind your pipettes.”

These were the words that filled a room of world-leading scientists as Jackie Beaumont, an oesophageal cancer survivor, opened...

5 hot research topics our scientists are homing in on

From the mechanics behind fast-moving melanoma cells to cancer’s very own (and very complex) family tree, we’ve picked a handful of important research discoveries to share...

Genetic chaos in tumours could help predict chemo response

Cancer Research UK scientists have shown how the level of genetic chaos in tumours could help predict patients’ response to chemotherapy.

Cataloguing the genetic chaos in oesophageal cancer

On the 27th of September 2013 Tracy Collinson’s world turned upside down. Seemingly out of nowhere, her husband Nigel – father to their two young boys – was diagnosed with...

Can ‘jumping genes’ cause cancer chaos?

Statistically speaking, your genome is mostly junk.

Less than two per cent of it is made up of actual genes – stretches of DNA carrying instructions that tell cells...

‘Jumping genes’ may drive oesophageal cancer

Scientists have found that ‘jumping genes’ may add to the genetic chaos behind more than three-quarters of oesophageal cancer cases.

Men are 50 per cent more likely to get oesophageal cancer than 30 years ago

Oesophageal cancer rates in men have increased by 50 per cent since the early 1980s, with new cases reaching almost 6,000.

Overweight children may be at higher risk of oesophageal cancer as adults

Overweight children may be at higher risk of oesophageal (gullet) cancer when they grow up than their slimmer friends.

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