Cancer news

Latest news, press releases and blog posts from Cancer Research UK.

Immunotherapy

Lung cancer discovery points to a better way to personalise immunotherapy

New research by our scientists may have identified a new way to predict which patients might benefit from certain immunotherapies, and those who likely won’t.

8 new challenges between us and beating cancer

We launch phase 2 of our Grand Challenge with 8 of the biggest questions in cancer research.

Discovery could guide immunotherapy for lung cancer

Scientists have discovered a new type of immune cell that could predict which lung cancer patients will benefit most from immunotherapy treatment.

ASCO 2017: 4 ways treatment could change following world’s largest cancer conference

Targeted treatment up front improves survival for advanced prostate cancer, and we predict a change in thinking for precision cancer medicine.

Combining immunotherapies could benefit some aggressive breast cancers

Using two immunotherapy drugs together could help treat some patients with an aggressive form of breast cancer, according to an Australian study.

Testing a new immunotherapy treatment for neuroblastoma

A researcher explains an early stage clinical trial testing the potential of a new type of immunotherapy to treat neuroblastoma.

CRISPR genome editing and immunotherapy – the early adopter

How is CRISPR genome editing helping harness the power of immunotherapy?

Blood tests, microbes, immunotherapy and more: AACR 2017’s hottest topics

At AACR 2017, thousands of doctors and scientists shared progress in cancer research. Read about the hottest topics.

Blocking growth of tumour blood vessels could boost immunotherapy

Immunotherapy treatment could be improved by blocking molecules that help tumour blood vessels grow, according to two new lab-based studies.

Long term benefits of immunotherapy emerging for some patients, though key questions remain

A number of cancer clinical trials involving immunotherapy treatments appear to be showing promise, according to new research.

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